Saving and sharing your photos, after they’re scanned

Unclutterer reader Mary wrote to us about her challenges regarding scanning and saving her family photos. Last week, I wrote about deciding which photos to scan and choosing a photo scanner or a scanning service.

Once the scanning has been done, there are a few more decisions to make.

Decide how to privately store the scanned photos

You’re not going to want to store those photos in a single place, because they are too valuable for that. So, if you use a scanning service and the photos are returned on a DVD, don’t keep them only on that DVD.

If you have a limited number of photos, and you have a good computer backup strategy in place, you may want to simply load the scanned photos onto your computer and rely on those backups.

But if you have a large photo collection, you may want to look at cloud storage options. Some new options are Yahoo’s Flickr 4.0 and Google Photos, both of which were announced in May. On The Verge, Casey Newton wrote a summary of photo storage options in April, along with updates for Flickr 4.0 and Google Photos. Both of these services provide tools to automatically upload photos and a huge amount of storage space. They also have tools to automatically detect what’s in the photos and then organize the photos for you.

Decide how to share the photos

Both Flickr and Google Photos have photo-sharing options, so you can easily take photos from your private storage and share them with others in a variety of ways, including exporting them to social networks such as Facebook or sharing via emailed links. Of course, you can share photos using social networks and email without using either of those tools, too.

You may also decide you want to print out some of the best photos to a photo book, as Dave suggested. You could also put selected photos on a digital photo frame.

Decide what to with the originals

Archivists will tell you to always save the originals, whether that means negatives, prints, or slides. The National Archives website states: “Do not throw away your original film and prints after you digitize them. Digitized images are not considered a replacement for originals. Data (i.e. your images) can be lost when the storage media deteriorates; and software and hardware technology become rapidly obsolete, in some cases making retrieval of the images difficult if not impossible.” Unclutterer reader Michael made a similar point in the comments to last week’s post.

However, this is a personal risk management decision, and you may decide to ignore that professional advice. Remember that photos need to be stored properly if they are going to be preserved — you can’t just throw them in the attic. If you do decide to keep them, you’ll want to use storage materials that pass the Photographic Activity Test (PAT). There are boxes designed specifically for negatives, as well as boxes for prints.

In the past, Erin has suggested offering the originals to friends and relatives as a way to get them out of your home without destroying them.

Unitasker Wednesday: The Celery Snack Attack

All Unitasker Wednesday posts are jokes — we don’t want you to buy these items, we want you to laugh at their ridiculousness. Enjoy!

I have a unitasker crush on this week’s selection. First, it’s adorable, in all its fake, molded plastic, celery design. Second, it seems to do the job it was designed to do (which is saying a LOT in comparison to most of the unitaskers we feature). And third, it has the best name ever: The Celery Snack Attack.

THE SNACK ATTACK! Love it. Watch out for the attacking, violent, little strips of celery!

This delightful unitasker obviously does the same thing as a million other all-purpose, reusable, food containers do. And, in theory, you could likely use it for carrots … though you would obviously want to use the carrot version. (Yes, that’s right, there is a precious carrot-shaped one of these things. And an apple! And a grape!)

They’re all so cute! And all so wholly unnecessary!

I appreciate that these little guys exist, even though no one has a need to own them in all their sweet unitasker glory.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2014

2013

2011

  • Unitasker Wednesday: Coffee Grinder Brush
    Sadly, this specialized brush can’t do the job of getting particulates out of your grinder any better than a pastry brush (which you probably already own if you’re grinding your own coffee and spices).
  • Searching for inspiration for a multipurpose guest room
    I’m looking for ways to make our guest room into a fabulous guest room and a practical hobby room in one. The solution will have to include storage for the hobby supplies that can be completely closed up when guests are present and using it for their retreat. And, I want it to be extremely practical as a hobby room when guests aren’t visiting.

2010

  • Musings on children’s birthday parties
    As a parent, you want the world for your kid. You want your child to be liked by his classmates, you want your child to be happy, and you want to celebrate his life. A basic swimming party with hamburgers can easily cost a hundred dollars — spending 10 times more once a year on a birthday party wouldn’t seem like such a big deal, especially if you’ve got the disposable income to do it. Research even shows that experiences make you happier than physical possessions.

What to do with an unused piano

An Unclutterer reader wrote to us asking a surprisingly common question:

I’m currently getting ready to move out of state. I’m retired, and am downsizing everything in my life. I have a piano that my father gave me when I was in high school. He passed away over 20 years ago. I’m moving to a small beach cottage on the Oregon coast. I am struggling with the decision of not taking the piano. I don’t really play it anymore, and feel that it isn’t going to fit in our small home. Somehow, I’m not sure if this is the right decision. What are your thoughts?

This is a question I can relate to, as I’ve been on both the giving and the receiving end of a piano. In addition to being a large instrument, pianos can also hold great sentimental value for their owners. Therefore, what to do with a piano can be a difficult decision.

The piano

First and foremost, pianos are big. Even a small upright piano can be as large as a couch. Inviting one into your home is a commitment, as they’re big, heavy, and difficult to move. Typically, once a piano has been placed in its spot, that’s where it’s going to stay until you move.

Don’t get me wrong, a piano is not a burden. It’s a lovely instrument. And, like many other objects, a piano can harbor tremendous sentimental value. When I was in high school and a dedicated music student, my parents acquired a piano from family friends who wanted to offload it. For the price of moving it across town, the piano was ours. I adored it and spent countless hours on the bench, playing away.

When I moved out to attend college, my parents were left with a massive piece of unused furniture. I was the only one in the family who played, and while I studied far away in Boston, the old piano back in Pennsylvania was being used to display family photos. After much deliberation, they decided the piano had to go.

The sentiment

The weight of emotion can be even stronger than trying to budge a piano that exceeds 400 pounds. In 2010, the BBC published an article, “What is nostalgia good for?”, which acknowledged the appeal of keeping sentimental items:

Nostalgia is a way for us to tap into the past experiences that we have that are quite meaningful — to remind us that our lives are worthwhile, that we are people of value, that we have good relationships, that we are happy and that life has some sense of purpose or meaning.

The article also noted the potential risks of keeping everything from the past:

While highlighting the benefits of nostalgia, a 2006 report in Psychology Today magazine has warned that ‘overdoing reminiscence’ risks an absence of joy derived from the present, and a reliance on past memories to provide happiness.

If you have no need for the piano, but it holds a great deal of sentimental value for you, perhaps there’s a book of sheet music in the piano’s bench you can display in a quality frame. Maybe the rack that holds up the music can be removed and repurposed elsewhere in the house. For your specific situation, I’d suggest finding a way to display some part of that experience in a meaningful way that will let you say goodbye to the piano itself.

As far as getting rid of the actual piano, start by asking friends if they might be interested in having it. Talk with music teachers — at schools, music stores, and those who give private lessons — to see if there might be students who are looking to acquire an instrument. List it on Craigslist or your local Freecycle if you can’t find the piano’s next owner in one of the previously mentioned ways. And, finally, see if the next resident of your home might be interested in having it. It’s very difficult to sell pianos, so prepare to think of it as a donation instead of something with monetary value.

Good luck and congratulations on your new home.

Organize your kids for camp

It’s difficult to believe, but summer begins next week for those of us in the northern hemisphere. My to-do list is long and one of the items on that list is to help get my kids organized for camp. Like countless kids across the country, they’ll join their friends — and make new ones — at camp.

You can help make the experience even more pleasant for them with strategic planning before Jr. walks out the door.

All types of camps

You son or daughter will likely receive a list of requirements and suggestions from the camp itself. Start shopping for these items at least a week in advance, if not longer. This will avoid the last-second rush and allow you to label everything properly. Speaking of labels…

Get some labels for the kids’ clothing and other personal items. There are many of these available: Name Bubbles makes some cute ones, including a whole line meant to “…last all summer long.” Be sure to label items that she or he might take off, like hats, flip-flops, and t-shirts, as well as accessories like sunscreen and lunch boxes. If you don’t want to purchase labels, a permanent marker will do a good job, as well as a laundry marker.

Sleep away camp

It’s a good idea to provide your little camper with a Re-Pack list that he or she can check when preparing to come home. Stick it in your child’s bag and laminate it, if you can.

Also, only pack clothes and other items that can get lost without causing a big deal. That beloved, irreplaceable shirt that Jr. simply adores might not be the best choice for camp, no matter how cool it is.

Pack liquids and anything that might be attractive to pests in zip-top bags. Write on the bags the contents with permanent markers so items have a greater chance of returning to the bags.

Day camp

A lesson my family learned the hard way: don’t send your child’s nice school backpack to camp. It will get used, abused, and stuffed with sand, dirt, and who knows what else. Go out (again, well ahead of time) and buy an inexpensive bag that can get beat up because it will.

Similar to the Re-Pack list recommended for sleep-away camp, make a daily checklist for your child’s backpack/bag. Again, laminate the list so that you can write special daily items on it as reminders (like a plain white t-shirt for tie-dyeing one day) in addition to the regular things.

If swimming is a regular part of the camp, pack a large zip-top bag. Get the biggest one you can find so wet swimsuits and towels can be stored away from other items in the bag.

If you or your children regularly attended or attend summer camp, what additional tips would you share to keep kids organized? Feel welcome to leave them in the comments.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2011

  • Organizing advice from classical Greeks
    More than 2,000 years ago, famous Greek philosopher Socrates and a man named Isomachus were having a discussion about how Isomachus wished his wife would run their home (the conversation is recorded by Xenophon in chapter eight of his writing Oeconomicus). Isomachus told Socrates he had asked his wife to keep house by finding a place for everything and having everything in its place.

2010

  • You are not your stuff
    I was recently captivated by the article “The mess he made: A life-long slob decides it’s time to get organized” by Michael Rosenwald in the June 7 issue of The Washington Post. As the title of the article references, the piece is a first-person narrative of a diagnosed hoarder who went to see Randy Frost for help to change his ways. During Rosenwald’s visits with Frost, he came to the following inspiring conclusion:
  • Organizing your home and family with notebooks
    Notebooks are great because they keep all of your important papers in one place and they are easily portable. In our home, we have a recipe notebook, appliance notebook (instruction manuals, purchase receipts, maintenance and repair receipts, and warranty information), and important information notebooks for all four of us (our cat even has one).

2009

  • Outfitting a minimalist kitchen
    A list of the 10 things I can’t live without in my kitchen.
  • The Uniform Project
    We’ve recently stumbled upon The Uniform Project and are amazed at the variety Sheena Matheiken is getting from a single dress and a lot of accessories.

Scanning the family photo collection

Unclutterer reader Mary recently wrote to us describing her biggest organizing challenge:

I have boxes and boxes of family photos (some from the 1920s) I’d like to scan in and put on CDs (is that a good way to save them?) and also put on a website where family members can access them and print out what they’d like to keep. How do I even get started? How do I organize the project? I’m overwhelmed just thinking about it. Do I need a special scanner? What’s the fastest and best quality scanner? Can I save the photos on the cloud? Is there a way to record information I have about the photo with the scan? A lot was written on the back of photos — can both sides be scanned at once? Should I get rid of duplicates or bad photos to start off? It’s hard to throw away photos. Any suggestions, including new tech solutions, would be appreciated.

Mary, dealing with photos can be overwhelming. But it’s a very rewarding project, and you can break it down into smaller pieces so it’s not so intimidating. The following are some ideas about how to approach this project, looking at each decision you’ll need to make.

Decide which photos to keep

You won’t want to spend time or money scanning photos you don’t even think are worth keeping, so unclutter first. Photos to consider tossing are:

  • Duplicates. If you have family or friends who would like the duplicate prints, you can certainly pass them along. But why keep duplicates yourself?
  • Bad photos. This would include photos that are out of focus, photos that cut off someone’s head, and photos that are unflattering. You may want to keep some of these if there’s something else especially notable about the photo, but in most cases these are good riddance.
  • Photos of scenery. This is a personal choice, but many times the photos people take of the places they visit just aren’t that remarkable. My parents went to Hawaii years ago and took many photos, but I can find much better photos of those places online. The photos I cherish are the ones of my parents in Hawaii, not the ones of Hawaii itself.

You might think of this as going on a treasure hunt, finding the real gems among the many photos. If you can’t bring yourself to throw away any photos right now, you might simply create two categories of photos: the best ones (which you’ll scan) and all the rest.

Decide whether to scan them yourself or use a scanning service

Many people have happily used scanning services. Erin used ScanMyPhotos, as did a recent commenter, L. Charles. The company takes your prints, negatives and/or slides, does the scanning, and ships you back a DVD with those scans (along with your originals). If mailing off your photos makes you nervous, you may be able to find a company that does the work locally. Using a scanning service will save you a lot of time. I doubt the service will scan the backs of the photos, though.

If you prefer to scan your photos yourself, you’re going to be best off with a scanner that doesn’t require you to put the photos through a paper feed. That’s because every once in a while a photo might get damaged going through that feed. However, if you already have something like a ScanSnap iX500 you may be willing to take that risk. I know people who have used similar scanners with no problems.

If you already have a flatbed scanner as part of an all-in-one printer, that might be all you need. But what if you don’t have an appropriate scanner and want to buy one? I’m not an expert regarding scanners so I can’t tell you which scanner is best, but I can point you to some alternatives.

There are some scanning devices designed specifically for photos, which can sound appealing. But Consumer Reports wasn’t thrilled with the pass-through photo scanners it tested, even though it acknowledged that they have some distinct advantages.

Another option is a flatbed scanner, especially one that’s designed to handle photos, negatives, and slides. I know someone who’s happy with the Canon CanoScan 9000F MKII Color Image Scanner, but there are many other scanners to consider. If any readers have experience with specific photo scanners, I hope they’ll add their comments.

If you’re scanning photos yourself, you can scan the backs of the photos to capture the writing. (If you have a duplex scanner, you can probably scan both at once.) You could even use a scanning service for the photos, and then go through and scan the backs of the photos yourself once the prints are returned to you.

Next week, I’ll address the issue of storing the photos once you have them scanned.

Unitasker Wednesday: Toasted Taco Fiesta

All Unitasker Wednesday posts are jokes — we don’t want you to buy these items, we want you to laugh at their ridiculousness. Enjoy!

After seeing The Lego Movie, my five-year-old son became obsessed with eating tacos. To keep with the theme of the movie, we decided to establish Tuesday as taco night and have been putting this exact same dinner on the meal plan for the past year. (I’m all for variety, but it’s also nice to have a set meal once a week that I don’t have to exhaust mental energy on planning or making.) Some weeks we use store-bought tortillas and taco shells and other weeks I make them at home. And after a year of weekly tacos, I can assure you there is no point during the taco-making process where you need the Toasted Taco Fiesta:

The reason this small appliance doesn’t work is because it’s a regular toaster, not an oven or even a toaster oven. And, as you know, standard toasters heat things with their elements, which are only on the sides of whatever you’re toasting. They’re not on the bottom and they have no way to heat the interior of the shell. Ovens and toaster ovens fill completely with hot air and heat all parts of the tortilla evenly. All this taco shell toaster is good for is heating up the outside of store-bought taco shells because the device would never be able to cook the inside of a tortilla to make a good taco shell.

And, I think we can all agree, a taco shell with a doughy interior is quite inferior to one with a crispy interior.

If you’ve never made taco shells at home, the following videos can show you how truly easy it is to do with tools you probably already own (like a bowl, your hands, a pan, and an oven). In the second video, the guy cooks the taco shells in a toaster oven exactly how I make shells in my regular oven–5 minutes at 400ºF over two of the oven rack’s spindles. It’s so crazy simple and they taste so much better than store-bought shells. (For what it’s worth, though, you can heat store bought taco shells in your oven or toaster oven the exact same way, just shorten the time to a minute or two instead of the full five.)

(Also: You don’t really need the tortilla press in the first video, as you can use a rolling pin or even a cookbook. The tortilla press just speeds up the process if you do this regularly. I have one and I use it when making ravioli and dumpling wrappers, too.)

I sincerely am starting to wonder what people have against using appliances they already own, especially when what they already own does a more effective job.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2013

2011

2010

2009

Tech to organize each room of the house

As an unclutterer who loves technology, I’m always looking for ways to marry the two. I had this in mind as my wife and I did some light spring cleaning this weekend. Nothing too major, we just made some preparations for the school year’s end like bringing out the beach towels, organizing the shed a bit, and making sure the yard equipment is in good order.

As I moved from room to room, I asked myself, “If I could share one bit of tech from this room with the Unclutterer readers, what would it be?” Behold the answer: one example of useful tech for each room in the house.

Kitchen

There are so many options here I struggled to pick just one, but I landed on the Belkin refrigerator mount for iPad. This device is so easy to install and extremely effective: ours has been in place for years. When affixed at eye level, you get a companion that can help with recipes, run a timer, provide music, stream TV shows, and display a calendar — all without taking up a lick of counter space.

If you have a tablet that isn’t a supported iPad model, consider the Aduro U-Grip Adjustable Universal Fridge/Wall Mount, as it accommodates a variety of tablet makes and models.

Bedroom

You could make an argument that the bedroom should be a sanctuary from the devices that demand our attention all day, like smartphones and laptop computers. I can’t argue with that, because for the most part, I agree.

However, I’ve used my iPhone as an alarm clock for years, and this retro radio-style dock from Areaware has held it beautifully on my nightstand for a long time. It’s more form than function, sure, but it keeps the phone at a readable angle so I needn’t lift up my phone to read the time in the morning. The device also channels my phone’s charging cable toward the wall so I don’t have to see the cable dangling off the edge of my night stand.

Bathroom

The Withings Smart Body Analyzer (SBA) is a very cool tool indeed. When I was a kid, stepping on a scale meant standing stock still as the numbers beneath the needle settled into place. Today, the SBA can track your history and display it via beautiful apps for iOS and Andriod. It also takes your pulse and designs fitness goals for you, based on the data it records.

If that’s not enough, it can store data for multiple users and even share weather information before you leave the house. In short, it replaces a lot of other tools that would otherwise take up room.

Living Room

I feel like “living room” is an outdated concept, but when I was young the term referred to a house’s central gathering place. The room used for socializing and leisure. Since this room is often a house’s entrainment hub there are many uncluttered tech options to consider. My current favorite, though, are media streaming devices.

There are so many to choose from, including the Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Google Chromecast, Roku and more. Each has similarities and differences, but I’m mentioning it here for one reason: they can replace many of the DVDs and VHS tapes you might have hanging around.

Also, since they depend on your home’s WiFi network instead of IR for communication, like your TV’s remote does, you can place them completely out of sight. They’re useful, fun, and huge clutter reducers.

Closet

Not technically a room in the house, the closet still deserves attention, as they love to accumulate clutter. For those looking to add a bit of tech to a closet, I suggest an app called Closet+. It’s a database of all your clothes that keeps a record of what you have, but also lets you preview outfits with just a few swipes.

You can enter an item’s cost, the number of times you’ve worn it (which breaks down the “cost per wear” statistic. Love it.), date last worn, and more. You can even create packing lists for when you’re going away on vacation.

Storage

Finally, if you’ve got a basement, shed, or other storage area, I’ve previous shared a few ideas for those zones, too.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2013

  • How do you deal with refrigerator door clutter?
    Dave uses his refrigerator door as his family’s central information station … with horrible results. He wants to know all the tips and tricks the Unclutterer community implores to solve this common problem.

2012

  • Are you ready for an uncluttered career?
    Cluttered jobs lend themselves to creating frustration, unproductive stress, and disappointment. Like all other forms of clutter, is now the right time for you to clear the clutter and get on the path to a happier work life? Chris Guillebeau’s new book The $100 Startup might be the book to help you get started on your new uncluttered career.

2011

2010

2009

Organizing in a small apartment that lacks storage space

Unclutterer reader Tami recently wrote to us describing her biggest organizing challenge:

I just moved from a 2-bedroom, 1200-square-foot apartment into a 1-bedroom, 784-square-foot apartment. I LOVE my new place but to say “lack of storage” is an UNDERSTATEMENT. I have adequate space in the kitchen but I literally have NO linen closet, nowhere medicine cabinet, place for sheets, towels, just STUFF. I have a hall closet (which is where I have put my broom, mop, etc.) and placed a basket up top for sheets to try and organize, and a closet for the washer and dryer (yet another basket system for cleaning supplies, meds, and odds and ends) but I KNOW there has to be a better way!!!

Tami, this is a problem you share with many others. On Unclutterer, we’ve written before about strategies that often work in small spaces, but the following are some more suggestions that may work for you.

Re-evaluate what you own

When you’re in a small space, everything you own really has to earn a place in your home due to how functional it is or how much you care for it, aesthetically or sentimentally. There may be no room for anything that’s just “okay” or “perfectly good” if it isn’t something you need or love.

For example, how many bed linens do you really need? Many people get by with two sets: one on the bed and one spare. (And the same principle might apply to other linens, such as towels.) If you have a number of specialized cleaning products, could you move toward multipurpose cleaners?

Look beyond the (non-existent) closet shelves

You’ll want to be sure you’re storing things safely, where small children and pets can’t get to them (if that’s a concern in your living situation). And remember that medications are often best stored away from the humidity of a bathroom. The following are some alternatives to consider:

Use the backs of doors

Shoe pockets hung over a door can be used to store all sorts of things. Parent Hacks has a great list of ways this versatile product can be used. Elfa also has some door racks that might be worth a look.

You can use the backs of cabinet doors, too, adding baskets or trays.

Use the walls

Your lease may limit your options here, since it may preclude you from adding anything that would put a hole in the wall.

But even then, you have some options. For example, Perch attaches to many walls with damage-free Command Strips. If your lease doesn’t limit you, you can look into shelves and pegboards.

Consider different ways to store linens and towels

I’m assuming that you don’t have space to add a storage piece such as a cabinet, trunk, cart, or shelving unit. If you do have space, that’s one alternative, but certainly not the only one.

Some people store an extra set of linens between the mattress and the box springs. Some linens, such as tablecloths, can be stored on hangers. Placemats can be hung from hangers with clips.

Towels are a different challenge. Perhaps you could store them in an empty suitcase. (An under-the-bed storage box could work, too.) You could also add a towel rack that mounts in the door hinges to store extra towels.