Where’s Wallet can help you keep track of your wallet

I’ve been part of the Unclutterer writing team for a few years now. In that time, I’ve come to realize that with every post in some ways I’m “preaching to the choir.” That is to say, my posts are read in part by people who already have adopted a clutter-free mindset. That’s awesome for those people, and I’m so happy they come to the site to learn even more ways to live simply. However, I realize there are also members of the readership who are still working on uncluttering and simplifying. Which, admittedly, part of me is, too. For the collection of us who haven’t yet achieved full “uncluttered enlightenment,” this post is for you.

Last week I pointed out a Kickstarter campaign that caught my attention. Today, I’m back at it. This time I want you to check out Where’s Wallet, a clever wallet/companion app from Daniel Eckler. It’s not a digital wallet or a place to electronically store your credit card information, banking details, and so on. Instead, Where’s Wallet is a way to keep track of your wallet’s physical location and be prompted if you leave home (or a restaurant or anywhere) without it. Here’s how it works:

As you can see in the video above, each Where’s Wallet (they produce three models) contains a sensor that connects to an iPhone app. All you need to do is download the app and let it “discover” the wallet. Next, you tell the app to send you a message if you stray farther than you prefer from your wallet. (You set the distance.) There’s an option that lets you set how far away you’re allowed to get before the alarm goes off. I love it.

I also assume if you have misplaced your wallet in your home, you could reset the length of the tether to a small distance and then walk around until the app stops beeping. At that point you would know you were within close proximity to the wallet’s location, although there would still be a little searching. This wouldn’t be as convenient as a Tile Tag for this specific purpose, but it would certainly get the job done as long as you were in the same house as your wallet.

Years ago, my wife would tell people, “Dave’s hobbies include board games, music, and losing his wallet.” I was very good at it. A product like this would have saved me some frustration and prevented my wife from making this humbling –- but entirely accurate –- joke at my expense.

As of this writing, Where’s Wallet is has about $10,000 to go in its campaign with 33 days left. If this is something that you (or your spouse) can use, consider becoming a backer.

What personal collectors can learn from museums

Having a collection can add joy to your life, but a collection can also get out of hand and take over your home and your bank account. Museums have Collections Management Policies (PDF), and some of the topics discussed in these policies could also apply to anyone building and maintaining a collection. You may not need a written policy, but considering the following items may be useful:

Defining the scope of the collection

Have you thought about exactly what kind of thing you’re collecting? For example, a stamp collector might want to focus on first day covers or, alternatively, may have no interest in those covers. You may start out with a wide scope and decide to narrow it over time.

Adding to the collection

What are your priorities for adding to your collection? Do you have some holes in your collection that you want to fill? What’s your budget?

Museums have policies for “unsolicited donations,” and you may want a policy about gifts from well-meaning friends who notice your collection. Do you want to discourage them from buying you gifts to add to that collection, or are you happy to receive such gifts?

Removing items from the collection

When do items get removed from your collection? Museums sometimes remove items if they are redundant with others in the collection or if they are “of lesser quality than other objects of the same type in the collection.” They may also remove items that are “unduly difficult or impossible to care for or store properly.” Items may also get damaged to a degree where they no longer fit within the scope of the collection, and those items would be removed.

These same types of considerations could easily apply to your personal collection. And if the scope of your collection has changed over the years, you may find items that no longer seem to fit.

Taking care of the collection

Museums only display part of their collection at any time, rotating the items on display. Therefore, a museum’s policies will need to deal with caring for items currently on display and those in storage for future display. You may need to consider both situations, too.

Just as a museum would, you will want to consider whether items in your collection need to be kept at any specific range of temperatures and humidity. Depending on what items you collect, you may need to plan for pest control. You’ll also want to think about how to keep fragile items from being broken when on display and when being stored.

Making loans

Would you ever consider loaning out items in your collection? If so, think about whom you might make a loan to and how you’d want to handle any such transactions.

Maintaining an inventory and documentation

If you have a large collection, not all on display, having an inventory will help you remember what’s being kept where. An inventory will also keep you from buying duplicate items by mistake.

At some point, your collection will move on to others. You may choose to sell some items or give them to friends and family members, or others may inherit them from you. If you’re selling an item, the buyer may want evidence of authenticity, so you’d want to have a plan for storing any documents you have that address this. If items are being inherited, the recipients will often enjoy knowing the stories behind the items — when and where you got them, and why are they meaningful to you.

Getting insurance and appraisals

If your collection includes items of significant value, you may need specific insurance to cover the collection, which might involve getting appraisals done. That proof of authenticity mentioned previously may also affect the appraisal. In case of a loss (due to theft, fire, flood, etc.), the inventory list previously mentioned would be extremely helpful when making a claim to your insurance company.

Unitasker Wednesday: Pocket Card Tip Table

All Unitasker Wednesday posts are for entertainment — we don’t want you to buy these items, we want you to laugh at their ridiculousness. Enjoy!

This week’s unitasker selection is much like a retirement party. It’s an opportunity to express our gratitude for the many years of service given by the Pocket Card Tip Table:

In the time before cell phones, people carried this quaint little card around with them in their wallets. It helped to quickly determine the amount to tip someone for their services. It only served one purpose, even then, but it had utility and was convenient.

But then came the prevalent flip-style cell phone in the 1990s with its multipurpose calculator program, which made this little Tip Table less necessary. And now, making the Tip Table obsolete, there are hundreds of tip and bill splitting apps for smartphones that provide multiple features and require no space in your wallet. (Android and iPhone) Not to overlook the obvious, either, that service tipping has always been able to be determined by doing math in one’s head, one one’s fingers, or working it out on a slip of paper.

Here’s to the Pocket Card Tip Table. You served us well, old friend. Enjoy your retirement!

A year ago on Unclutterer

2013

2012

2011

  • Storing bed sheets
    If your linen closet is cluttered and overflowing with bed sheets, it might be time to unclutter and organize your collection.
  • Ask Unclutterer: Pesky plastic bags
    Instead of throwing away plastic grocery bags, reader Robert is looking for ideas on ways to reuse them.

2009

The benefits of uniforms

When our family first moved to England in 2013, our children were concerned about wearing school uniforms –- something they didn’t have to wear in Canada. After living here for almost two years, we’ve come to love school uniforms for many reasons: they save time, help us stay organized, and save us money.

After experiencing the benefits of school uniforms with my kids, I’ve adopted a uniform-style wardrobe for myself. Keeping a few basic pieces (similar styles of slacks, shirts, etc.) and a limited range colour palette, I can mix and match fewer pieces and still have a varied wardrobe. The uniform-style wardrobe is much easier to maintain and organize and is less expensive than my previous numerous-outfit wardrobe.

The following is an explanation of how my children’s school uniforms inspired a change in my closet:

  • In the mornings, little effort is expended deciding what to wear. The children simply put on their uniforms and I select a pant and top (they fit and they all work with each other).
  • When shopping, we know exactly what to buy for school clothing and I have a specific idea of what I need. The school provides the requirements for the kids and lists a few stores that provide quality clothes that meet the dress code.
  • When doing laundry, I don’t spend nearly as much time as I did in Canada separating clothing out by fabric type and colour. Because both children wear the same uniform, we have one load of white dress shirts and one load of black trousers every week. And, since my wardrobe is in a limited colour palette, I experience similar benefits.

We have found that we are spending a lot less on clothing than we did in Canada. The quality of my kids’ school uniforms is very good. They wear like iron and wash like rags so they do not need to be replaced as often as other clothes. This reduction in our overall clothing budget has led to less packed closets that are easier to organize. The uniforms are neatly stored in one area and separated from the (much smaller) selection of non-uniform clothing.

Do you or your kids have a uniform-style wardrobe? Share your strategies for easier wardrobe maintenance with other readers in the comment section.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2014

2010

  • Ask Unclutterer: Credit card clutter
    Reader April asks how to control her credit card clutter that is overwhelming her.
  • George Washington: Simplicity seeker
    George Washington’s biography is a nice reminder that the problems and aggravations we face currently, and our desire for a more simple life, are often very similar to those experienced by the people who lived before us.

Three organizing tips from recent news

As I read the news for the past couple weeks, I noticed a number of stories that touched on organizing themes. The following subjects caught my eye:

Handling Craigslist exchanges

Would you like to sell some things on Craigslist, but finding a safe place to do the exchange of money and stuff has you concerned? Lily Hay Newman wrote an article for Slate about cities where police stations are offering their lobbies as those safe places.

Saving information before it disappears from the Internet

Many of us are keeping less paper than we used to because the information we want is available online. In some cases, we expect it might disappear and we’re fine with that. We know that stores don’t stock the same products forever, for example.

But what if you find something such as a particularly poignant personal essay that you want to keep for future reference? As Carter Maness wrote:

We assume everything we publish online will be preserved. But websites that pay for writing are businesses. They get sold, forgotten and broken. Eventually, someone flips the switch and pulls it all down.

Maness wrote from the perspective of authors whose work is no longer available to show to editors who may want to hire them. But for those of us who are the readers, it’s a good reminder that we can’t assume that creating a bookmark or favorite will ensure we can retrieve a precious bit of writing. Besides the commercial websites that Maness mentions, there are personal websites and blogs that the owners decide to discontinue (or which get taken down after a death).

You may be able to find a missing article through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, but there’s no certainty about that. Therefore, you may want to keep selected articles in digital form on your own devices by saving them to Evernote, by printing them to PDFs, by saving them as webarchive files (if you use the Safari browser), etc.

Preparing for your digital afterlife

Dave has written before about estate planning for your digital assets, but there’s a new twist. As Rachel Emma Silverman reported in The Wall Street Journal:

A controversial new state law is making it easier for estate executors to access digital data — such as email, photos and social-media postings — after the account holder dies.

Many Internet companies strictly limit access to their customers’ accounts to the account holder, in accordance, they say, with federal privacy law. …

But under a Delaware law passed last summer, executors can now access online accounts without a court order, unless the deceased has instructed otherwise. Similar legislation is under consideration in several other states.

Silverman went on to explain why this may also matter to people in the U.S. who don’t live in Delaware. Her article may inspire you to ensure your own estate-planning documents clearly state your wishes when it comes to accessing your digital files. Consult with your personal estate attorney to get guidance regarding your particular situation.

Unitasker Wednesday: Victor Floating Bathtub MP3 Player

All Unitasker Wednesday posts are for entertainment — we don’t want you to buy these items, we want you to laugh at their ridiculousness. Enjoy!

Like many people, I have a portable shower-safe speaker that can play anything from my smartphone and computer. It’s Bluetooth enabled so it also has a microphone in case I were to have a weird desire to talk hands free on my smartphone during my shower (which, who actually does that??!). The shower-safe speaker cost me $20 and has worked for four years without any issues. To summarize: my shower-safe speaker is waterproof, plays my entire music collection and podcasts, and even has phone capabilities for not a lot of money (TWENTY dollars). Mine also has buttons to advance, repeat, shuffle, etc. and I can take it anywhere like the beach or pool or hang it from the bathtub faucet during a bath. Now, let’s compare that to this week’s unitasker selection, the Victor Floating Bathtub MP3 Player:

Let’s start with the most ridiculous attribute of this week’s unitasker: It’s $250. The second most ridiculous attribute: It’s not Bluetooth enabled, so you have to load your music onto it via a USB cable from your computer. And, it only has an internal memory of 256MB (that’s right, megabytes, not gigabytes … megabytes). To put this in perspective, my computer currently has something like 50 gigabytes of music stored on it that I can beam to my inexpensive shower speaker. A third ridiculous attribute is since it’s not Bluetooth enabled you can’t talk on your phone through it (if you’re that rare breed of person who wants such a feature). The final ridiculous attribute is that this speaker doesn’t have any way to hang it in a shower, so you’re limited to only using it in the bathtub.

Thanks go to Jeri for finding this outrageous unitasker for the Unclutterer team.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2014

2013

2010

2009

Bookniture: A clever furniture solution for small-space living

We don’t often point out crowd-funded projects like those you find on Kickstarter or Indiegogo, but when I saw the Bookniture project, I thought I must tell Unclutterer readers about this.

This product by designer Mike Mak is a clever, flexible, piece of furniture that folds away like a hardcover book when not in use. In fact, it even looks like a book when on a shelf or a table. To transform it into furniture, you simply open the “book” until the front and rear covers are touching, and then you lock them into place. It kind of reminds me of the old, folding turkey decoration my mom would put out for Thanksgiving.

The Bookniture video shows it being used in several settings, from a table to a chair to a standing desk support. I think it’s ingenious, portable, and definitely not a unitasker. As of this writing, the project has earned a little more than half of its funding goal with 36 days to go. You can learn more about the project on Bookniture’s Kickstarter page.

Left-handed organizing

Tools are extensions of your hands. When you use proper tools, you decrease the possibility of injury, pain, and fatigue because they require less continuous force and can be used without awkward postures. The correct tool also reduce clutter because you have the best tool for a job and aren’t constantly purchasing the same item repeatedly in search of the ideal tool for you. How you complete processes is similar, too, because when you work in the best way suited for you work times are reduced, you’re more organized, and more comfortable.

When fellow Unclutterer, Dave talked about the value of his utility knife, I had to agree with him. However my utility knife is different from Dave’s because mine is a left-handed utility knife.

If you’re a southpaw or live or work with one, the following are some productivity and organizing tips that might be beneficial for you.

Buy good quality left-handed tools. As stated earlier, the proper tool for the job is essential. It will lead to increased productivity, less fatigue, and fewer injuries. Start with the tools used most often such as scissors, can openers, vegetable peelers and even manicure scissors. Consider purchasing other left-handed equipment that can make certain tasks easier, such as gardening shears and sewing scissors.

Set up your personal space. On the desk of a lefty, the pen caddy would be placed on the left side and the telephone on the right side. Because lefties sit facing the right side of the desk, the desk lamp should be placed on the right side as well. Professional organizer Julie Bestry has a great post about left-handed notebooks that might help lefties increase productivity.

Set up shared spaces together. When lefties and righties share space, it can be a bit more difficult to be organized and productive.

Sometimes shared spaces can be set up ambidextrous, for example, putting the telephone in the centre of the desk so it can be answered with either hand. Alternatively determine who uses the space for a greater period of time and set it up according to that person’s hand preference.

Research indicates that individuals show a preference for the use of one hand, and it is not always the same hand for two different tasks. This suggests that right- or left-handers are not general categories, but rather are defined as a function of the tasks. For example, many lefties prefer to use their computer mouse with their right hand so a shared computer would have the mouse on the right hand side. This means when people work together to organize a space they can develop solutions that will allow all users of the space to be productive.

For a great overview on left-handedness you may wish to read, “Why are some people left-handed? An evolutionary perspective.

For left-handed shopping try:

A year ago on Unclutterer

2011

2010

  • Why we hold on to sentimental clutter
    Sentimental clutter plagues our attics, basements, closets, garages, and desks. These sentimental trinkets can keep us from moving forward with our lives physically and emotionally. If there is so much of the past taking up space in the present, there isn’t room to grow.

2009