How to be a good host: planning for house guests

We love to have people stay with us. In my case, it’s in my blood. My parents ran a B&B for years, not because they needed the money, but because they loved meeting new people and taking care of them (I was going to say “showing them a good time” but it wasn’t that sort of B&B).

However, being a great host requires a lot of planning, thought, and preparation if you and your guests are going to have a good time and not end up stressed out by the end of the visit.

There’s a great article over on The Kitchn about how to be a good host and we do quite a few of the things listed there, but I thought I’d put down exactly what we do to make our friends and family feel that staying with us is like going to a 5-star resort, and yet without exhausting ourselves.

We plan meals in advance

If people have full and satisfied tummies, they are much happier and more relaxed. We always discuss options and give our expected guests a few (but not too many) choices. Eat in or dine out? Any food allergies or preferences? We also know most of our guests well, so can plan around their favourite foods (for example, one friend always has sushi and strawberry mojitos waiting for her when she comes over).

We cook as much as we can before guests arrive

Our menus often center around food that can be prepared days (or at least hours) beforehand, giving us the freedom to be spend time with our guests. And if the food is last-minute only, we take turns playing host while the other busies himself in the kitchen.

A special breakfast is essential

There’s a reason B&Bs and breakfast buffets at hotels are so popular — nothing says vacation like taking time to sit and chat while eating a variety of sweet and savoury dishes and sipping at a cappuccino. As I said above, happy tummies equal happy guests. Unless your day starts with a tight schedule, don’t rush through breakfast. And if you do have to get going without that relaxing café con leche, how about take some previously prepared muffins along for the ride?

We come up with a list of possible excursions

There’s nothing worse than getting a bunch of people together and then saying “so what do you want to do?” No one knows, ever. No one wants to be the pushy one. No one wants to be the one to decide.

When we have guests, we either tell them the plan (so many people on holiday love not having to think), or we give them a list of (limited) options to choose from. By thinking of possible outings before guests arrive, no one ends up sitting on the sofa staring at the ceiling wondering why they came to visit you anyway.

A shower-sergeant is imperative

Early July there were six of us in our one-bathroom apartment in La Rioja. We had a winery visit at noon and we finished our slow-breakfast at 10:30. Six people needed to shower, do their hair and get ready to leave for 11:45. If we hadn’t chivvied them along, we would never have left. It’s quite amusing to see even the most sensitive and anger-prone people jump up and dash into the bathroom without complaint when they hear “Next!” shouted out in our best “parent-voice.”

It’s all about the details

This is something I’ve learned from my husband. Turn your guests’ stay into something luxurious and extraordinary by:

  • Giving each guest a little kit of amenities from those that you’ve collected from your own hotel stays.
  • Having a guestbook where you paste a Polaroid onto the page and get them to write something about their visit.
  • Showing them something special about your town/city that someone unfamiliar with the place would never see.
  • Playing a silly party game like musical chairs or pin the tail on the donkey. Even the most serious adult will unwind and end up fighting for that last chair, believe me.

Let people help

In the past, whenever guests offered a hand, I always used to say no. They were guests and shouldn’t have to raise a finger. And yet, when I’m a guest in a friend’s house, if I don’t help out I feel selfish and uncomfortable. So, I’ve started saying “Yes, of course you can help, thanks!” Whether it’s cutting up some vegetables, helping me make the beds, or handing me clothespins while I hang up the beach towels, it deepens the bond between us and gives our hands something to do while we chat and catch up on each other’s lives.

Give people time to do nothing

This last point is the hardest one for us to have learned. We tend to believe that if our guests are sitting on the sofa playing with their mobiles, more or less in their own little worlds, it’s because we aren’t doing our jobs as hosts. But that’s not true, at all. Everyone needs to disconnect from interacting with each other. It’s exhausting being “on” all the time. And we’ve learned that this time is key for us as well. When we see that people are tuning out, we retire to the bedroom and take a well-needed nap, or slip into the kitchen to prepare a snack or some part of the next meal.

How about you? What do you do to make your guests’ stay memorable? Or what have you liked that someone else has done?

Will your stuff fit into your space?

Many years ago I did a consultation with a person who was looking for suggestions regarding how to store things in her kitchen and pantry, where she was running out of space. An avid cook, she was not interested in getting rid of any of her kitchen utensils, which really did get used.

As we’ve noted before on Unclutterer, in March and June 2015, there are many ways to make the most of a small space. But in this particular situation, I couldn’t see anything to recommend — the available space was being well used. There was just too much stuff to fit into the space, no matter how beautifully organized it was.

When there’s too much stuff for too little space, there are a few obvious options you can consider if you want to keep the stuff:

  • Move to a bigger home.
  • Add onto the house, if you own it.
  • Rent storage space.

Any of these can be a reasonable strategy under the right circumstances. But in this case, the items taking up all the extra space weren’t valuable items that would justify such an investment. They were mostly bulk purchases of paper goods and food items from warehouse clubs like Costco or packaged foods bought on sale at local grocery stores.

Large-quantity purchases are appealing because they can save you money as well as shopping time — and sometimes those savings will indeed be the most important consideration. Also, some of those bulk purchases might fulfill your need for disaster preparedness supplies.

But if bulk or on-sale purchases intrude on your living space and make your home more cluttered than you find comfortable, it may be time to re-evaluate your purchasing strategy. What trade-offs of savings vs. storage challenges make sense in your situation? As with many types of items people own the question becomes: How much space (and which specific space) in your home are you willing to dedicate to this category of thing?

Of course, large-quantity purchasing is not an all-or-nothing situation. You can choose some selected items to buy in bulk and pass on the rest. I buy a couple things in bulk from Amazon, including my floss picks, because I can’t find the specific products I want at local stores. But I do indeed have designated storage spaces for those items — and, of course, packages of floss picks don’t take much space.

And there are degrees of bulk and on-sale purchasing. For example, consider just how many rolls of toilet paper you really want to buy: 25 or 50, maybe? You probably don’t need 500, no matter how good the price.

Wall mounted system for storing fishing poles

Like to fish? Have plans to clean and organize your garage? I ran across this storage device and thought it was sleek and efficient. Upon inspection of the product, I discovered that it also could work as a way to store fencing foils and billiards/pool cues. I love the way the garage door is used as a storage space!

This post was originally published in August 2007.

RIM: Part two, record types and records inventory

In Records and Information Management, part one, we discussed GARP, Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles®. Today we’ll cover a few definitions and then prepare to organize records by doing a records inventory.

What is a record?

A record has recorded information, regardless of format, that is created or received by our household to conduct its daily activities. Examples of records include:

  • Bank statement (paper) delivered by mail
  • Utility bill (electronic) downloaded from the utility company’s website
  • Email receipt from the items you purchased online
  • Photo of a check from your friend who bought your old dining room suite

Three types of records: Active, Inactive, and Vital.

Active records are those needed to do your day-to-day activities. They include the water bill that you have to pay next week, receipts for items purchased that need to be reconciled with your bank account.

Inactive records are those that you need to keep for a specific period of time but will not likely refer to often, if at all. This can include your previous years’ income tax return, your will, and instruction manuals for items you purchased and still own.

Vital records are issued by government agencies to prove you exist. These include birth certificates, social security numbers, and passports. They can also include legal documents such as a deed to a house, adoption certificates or any other documents that might be difficult to replace.

Aren’t inactive records the same thing as archives?

Actually, no. Many people get archives and inactive records confused. Inactive records are destroyed as soon as they are no longer needed. Archives are a curated collection of inactive records that are kept forever. Not all inactive records are kept forever, just significant records — mementos of an important time or event. For example, the stub of your very first pay statement should have been shredded after you had filed your income taxes for that year. However, there is a justifiable reason to keep only the first one — as a memento of your first job. (Note: In business and industry, archives are built with many series of records that show the evolution of the business over time. Most households don’t need to keep an archive this detailed.)

Records Inventory

Before organizing, it is important to do an inventory to determine which types of records you have and where they are located. If we compare this to the S.P.A.C.E. model of organizing, the inventory is the “S” for sorting. However, rather than move boxes and physically sort through paper and computer files two or three times each, the inventory creates a short-cut so that you will save time when it comes to the next step, “P” for purge.

During the inventory, it is not necessary to list every document in every file. List groups of records and their date ranges. Remember to look in all of the places where you may have stored records. Also, there may be records stored on various computers, external hard drives, and cloud storage spaces so ensure you verify those as well.

As you progress through the inventory process, you will notice common characteristics about the records that you have. Some items like electric bills, water bills, heating bills, you can group into a common category such as Utilities.

Create a spreadsheet to keep track of the information as shown in the example below. It is helpful to add columns that tell how often the document is created, and how often the document is accessed.

You shouldn’t do a detailed re-arranging of files at this point but feel free to pile storage boxes and filing cabinets into one room. For example, if the attic is creepy and difficult to access, you could move those boxes into your home office. If you move the boxes remember to note the new “current location” on your inventory sheet.

Next up, we’ll look at how to know which records to keep and which to purge.

 

Also in this series:

Readers ask for help with storage and more

Recently, we received a pair of emails from readers who find themselves in unenviable circumstances. Both are dealing with financial and health difficulties that are making it very difficult to maintain and afford a storage space that’s full of precious, sentimental items. It’s not a good situation, and again, one I imagine many readers can relate to. While I don’t have the perfect answer (and I really wish I did), I’ll share my thoughts here, and I encourage you, fellow unclutterers, to do the same in the comments. Hopefully the readers who sparked this post will find something in my words or yours that helps. Let’s start with very small steps.

A thing a day

A few years ago, we wrote about a technique called “A thing a day,” which first came to our attention via the Unclutterer forums. The premise is simple: eliminate one item per day until you reach a manageable cache of stuff.

Of course, it needn’t be a single item. You could do five items per day, or ten. You could wait for the weekend and pick a dozen items to part with on a Sunday. I mention it here for a few reasons. First, it’s not emotionally overwhelming or especially physically demanding. These two readers are dealing with a lot right now, including an urgent need to get on top of some items in storage. Also, the methodical elimination of several items could get you to a place where the storage facility is no longer needed, thus saving you some money. Of course, it’s not always that easy.

Sentimental clutter

Both readers expressed that there are many sentimental items among their stuff. Parting with sentimental clutter can be very difficult. Sentimental items usually don’t fall into the category of “If I haven’t used it in [x] amount of time, I can throw it out.” That’s because utility has very little to do with why you’re keeping that object. So how do we part with these things? I’ll refer you to a post we published in 2011:

Remember that clutter is anything that distracts you from pursuing the life of your dreams. If you have so much sentimental stuff that it is causing a stressful mess or taking up room in your home for things that matter more to you, you will want to cull the clutter. But, you don’t have to get rid of all your sentimental stuff. At least for me, some of the things I keep for sentimental reasons are objects that reflect what I value most. My grandmother is one of my most favorite people on the planet, and having her rocking chair makes me smile and remember all the wonderful times we have shared. So, I keep that exact chair. However, I don’t keep every card she ever sent me or every gift she ever gave me because I don’t have room to keep everything and the chair elicits the happiest of all the memories.

When deciding on sentimental keepsakes, aim for quality over quantity. I loved my grandfather dearly. He was a tremendous artist. Today, I have a pencil sketch that he did hanging on my wall. The same picture hung in his living room when I was a kid, and I always admired it. Today, it’s the perfect — and only — physical thing I have to remind me of my grandfather, and it’s all I need.

Lastly, see if you can employ help from family, friends, neighbors, or co-workers. A person who’s empathetic to your situation could help with reducing the need for a storage facility, the labor of going through a lot of stuff, and the anxiety of keeping it all in line. Even cataloging what you own by writing it all down can help reduce the feeling of being overwhelmed.

I hope this was helpful. Now I turn it over to you, fellow unclutterers. What advice would you give these readers? We welcome your comments below.

Reader question: How to dispose of unused medications

A reader sent us the following question:

“A family member is taking medications for a long term illness. Periodically, the medication is changed. We have ended up with many partial bottles of medications and empty bottles. The prescription bottles have info on it that you wouldn’t necessarily want to get in the wrong hands if you just threw it in the trash as well as old meds. What is a good way to dispose of these?”

When I was younger, I dumped old medicines down the toilet and flushed them. Just so we’re clear, this was the WRONG thing to do. I had no idea that medications (prescription and over-the-counter drugs) are hazardous waste, which they are, and I was just polluting the environment unwittingly. Shame on me.

I have learned my lesson, however, and can offer some advice to you on this issue:

  • DO NOT flush unused medications down the toilet or wash them down the sink.
  • Many pharmacies and doctor’s offices have pharmaceutical take-back programs. Call before you go, but this is a simple option if you’re headed to the pharmacy anyway to pick up a new prescription.
  • The EPA suggests that you black out with a permanent marker your personal information and your doctor’s information on the container, and then take your unused medications to your local hazardous waste facility. To find your local facility, check out the search tool on the Earth911 website.
  • Look at the printed material accompanying your medications to see if there are special disposal instructions. In some cases, the FDA advises what procedure to use. The list of special drugs can be found on this page if you have inadvertently discarded your original printed materials.

I hope that this advice is helpful. This is also a good opportunity to remind everyone to regularly clean out your medicine chest for health, safety and uncluttering reasons!

 

This post was originally published in July 2007.

Post-vacation planning

Returning from holidays is always stressful, isn’t it?

Catching up with what you’ve missed, dealing with the dozens (or hundreds!) of emails, getting back into the rhythm of a routine, expectations from bosses and coworkers, the need to deal with employees who’ve gotten used to you not being around.

Sound familiar?

It almost makes you not want to go away on vacation.

It doesn’t have to be like that, however.

There’s a trick to getting ready for vacation that most of us miss. In planning our absence, we look at that last day before holidays as our objective: get everything organized so that people can cope without when we are gone. When we reach that day, we let out a big sigh and switch into relaxation mode blocking out the horrid reality of that eventual return to the office.

What if we change our focus a bit? Instead of focusing on the last day before our holidays, we should look at the first week we get back.

Take the last few days before you go away to get everything organized for your return. Consider how you are going to handle each of the following items:

  • How much time will you need to set aside each day to catch up on email and other communications? Block out that time now.
  • Who will you need to meet with to find out what has moved forward (or not)? Schedule those meetings before you leave.
  • What routines do you need to get back into? Slide into them slowly, adding one routine a day (gym, preparing lunches, etc…). If you have the chance, how about reintroducing them a few days before you start up at work again?

This year, I didn’t quite get everything planned before my last day (last Monday), so I took a few hours (rather randomly) in my first couple of days free to tie up a few loose ends and to better plan my return. Yes, it ate into my holiday a bit, but I’d much rather lose a few hours at the beginning of my time off so that I can thoroughly enjoy the rest of it and not return to work to chaos and stress.

Vacations are to relax and recharge. By planning your return, you can preserve all the tranquility you’ve created for yourself (in fact I think vacation planners should come with a post-vacation planning section). As an added bonus, by thinking beyond your last day and focusing on your first week back, you don’t need to worry about anything while you are gone. You can truly go on holiday, disconnecting from everything at work, even forgetting altogether that it exists.

Weekend project: Organize under the bed

Many home projects can be completed in under 30 minutes, yet have a big impact on your day-to-day life. With that in mind, I like to tackle a good Weekend Project. Anything from organizing the tool shed to creating a daily routine is well worth the time and effort. Today we’re going to take a peek somewhere that most people avoid: under the bed.

Feng Shui practitioners know that nothing should be stored underneath one’s bed. My practice is lacking then, as I keep a lot of stuff under there. I suspect many of you do, too. If that’s the case, here’s a look at how you can take an afternoon this weekend to get control over what’s stored underneath your bed. The first step is identifying what’s down there in the first place.

Dare to explore

The area underneath one’s bed is often a dark and scary place, full of hidden surprises, and I don’t mean just the dust bunnies. A great way to start is to pull everything out. For each item, decide to put it in either the “keep” pile, the “donate” pile or the “toss” pile. This won’t take long as there’s only so much stuff that can fit underneath your average bed. When that’s done, send anything in “donate” or “toss” to the appropriate destination and turn back to the “keep” pile.

Proper, convenient storage

First, make sure everything is in a labeled bin, with the label facing out. In my experience, anything tossed under there loosely will gravitate to the center, never to be seen again. You’ll probably need several transparent or semi-transparent containers with lids. If you can, find some that also have casters or wheels, even better (this one from Sterilite is ideal).

Before you buy any, take measurements of the space underneath your bed. Write it down somewhere so you can refer to it while at the store.

What to put under the bed

I’ve got a few solutions, depending on whose bed we’re talking about:

  1. Your own — Out-of-season clothing, shoes, and extra linens are a great choice.
  2. The kids — Their books, board games, puzzles, and so on.
  3. The guest room — Guest linens, extra blankets (make sure they’re freshly washed before guess arrive). We also keep gift wrapping supplies under there.

Yes, it’s a drag to haul everything out from under there and sort it. But it’s worth the effort believe me. Feng Shui or not, you’ll be glad you spent some time organizing underneath the bed.

Making the time to learn new skills

Does your to-do list — or your project list or someday/maybe list, if you follow the Getting Things Done methodology — have things like learning to play golf, learning French, or learning to play an instrument? You may have been intimidated by the frequently quoted statistic that it takes 10,000 hours to get good at something.

But as Josh Kaufman points out in his informative and entertaining TEDx Talk, that 10,000-hour rule only applies if you want to become an expert in a highly competitive field: a star athlete, a world-class musician, etc. If you just want to be reasonably good, he says, you can learn a new skill with just 20 hours of practice — a number that’s a lot less intimidating.

Kaufman has a book which elaborates on the TEDx talk, but you can get the gist of his thinking from that talk, from his conversation with Jonathan Fields on the Good Life Project website, from his document entitled The First 20 Hours: Secrets of Rapid Skill Acquisition (PDF) on ChangeThis.com, and from the information on his own website.

Kaufman recommends that you follow these steps to learn any new skill:

Deconstruct the skill

Decide exactly what you want to be able to do, and set a target performance level. Then break the skill down into smaller pieces. That’s the same advice you’ll see for tackling any large project.

Listening to Kaufman talk about having a well-defined target made me think about how I approached learning French some years ago. My goal in learning French was to know enough to perform basic tourist activities: reserve a hotel room, buy a train ticket, order a meal in a restaurant, etc. Having that focused goal kept me from being overwhelmed — especially since language skills don’t come easily to me. When Kaufman discussed his work on Good Life Project website, he gave an example very similar to this.

Kaufman’s ChangeThis document has a nice example of deconstructing a skill you’ve chosen as your goal:

Take golf for example — in the course of a single game, you do many different things: driving off the tee, selecting clubs, chipping out of bunkers, and putting on the green. Each of those activities is a skill in itself.

Learn enough to self-correct

It’s easy to get caught up in theoretical learning, from books and other resources, rather than actually practicing the skill. Kaufman urges you to learn just enough of the basic concepts that you can self-correct when you’re doing your practice. Beyond this, focusing on learning rather than jumping in and practicing is just a way of procrastinating, he says.

Remove the barriers to practice

You can easily get derailed from practicing a new skill, especially at the beginning when you’re no good at something. So set up your environment to minimize distractions, and make it as easy as possible to do the practicing. On the Good Life Project, Kaufman talks about keeping that guitar you want to learn to play close at hand, not buried away in a closet where it’s difficult to access.

Practice at least 20 hours

Pre-commit to those 20 hours — twice a day for 20 minutes for one month will do it. In his book (and on the Good Life Project) Kaufman recommends setting a timer for those 20 minutes, because we tend to be horrible at estimating how long we’ve been doing something.

And as he says in his ChangeThis document:

If you’re not willing to commit to at least 20 hours of practice, then drop the project and learn something else. Life is short.

Get your dot on

Alex Fayle offered the following tip in the comments section on one our posts. It was such a good suggestion, we thought we would bring it to your attention:

A simple way of knowing if you actually use things is to get removable coloured dots and stick one to each of your small appliances and kitchen gadgets. As you use your things, take off the dot (hence why you want to get removable dots).

After six months look at all the things still with dots and decide if you actually want to keep them or not (some things only get used rarely but are totally worth their storage space).

You could just as easily use this approach in other areas of your home or office. Here’s a link to suitable 1/2″ removable colored dots at Amazon.com.

 

This post was originally published in May 2007.

RIM: Part one, Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles

Back in 2007, Erin wrote a series of posts on reducing paper clutter. In the past 10 years, there have been many changes. In some cases, the rules and regulations regarding the access and storage of paper and digital documents have changed. Technology itself has changed, and since more and more information is coming to us in electronic format, many of us are now overwhelmed by paper and digital clutter.

So, let’s look at this subject from the “managing information” point of view.

In the business world, organizing paper and electronic documents is commonly referred to as records and information management (RIM). Businesses have (or should have) systems set up to create, store, archive, and dispose their documents according to rules and regulations pertaining to their specific industries. Our homes are not businesses but there are several similarities. We have records related to income and expenses (receipts, pay statements). We have documents that prove we exist (birth certificates, social security cards) and that we have done things (school report cards, employment reviews).

We can adapt RIM theory to our households. ARMA International has developed Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles® (GARP). Let’s see how these principles can be applied to our personal and household recordkeeping.

Accountability: Someone in your household needs to be responsible for managing paper and electronic documents and information. If information management is to be a shared duty, ensure all of those who participate in the process know which tasks need to be done and how they should be done.

Integrity: Your paper and electronic documents need to be authentic and reliable. Ensure you have the original documents where required. If you transfer your paper documents to electronic format (or vice versa), ensure it is done properly. We will cover how to do this in an upcoming post.

Protection: Your records need to be safe. Paper documents, especially vital records and legal documents, should be kept in a locked safe or filing cabinet. Electronic records should be backed-up in at least two different places and password protected.

Compliance: You need to adhere to all laws and regulations pertaining to your information. If you have a home business, you might be required to keep different information from someone who does not. Those with unique financial or medical situations may be required to comply with other rules and directives. We’ll cover more about this in an upcoming post.

Availability: This is a key point for most people. You need to be able to access records easily and in a timely manner. Knowing which documents are paper and which are electronic, as well as where, and how they are stored is essential. We’ll review paper and electronic filing systems.

Retention: It is important to keep records for the required period. For example, the United States Internal Revenue Service requires that you keep your income tax records for three years after filing (and up to 7 years in certain circumstances). The Canada Revenue Agency requires six years. If you have receipts that were submitted for income taxes for both countries, you must keep records for the longer of the two. We’ll discuss a retention schedule that will help you develop an organized filing system.

Disposition: Most records need to be destroyed at the end of their lifecycle either by physical destruction such as shredding paper or destroying CDs, or by securely erasing/reformatting computer drives. Eliminating unneeded records saves space in your filing cabinet, saves time because you don’t have to manage so much stuff, and reduces your risk of identity theft because unneeded information is destroyed. However, you may wish to keep some records for your archives (e.g. stub from your first pay check, ownership papers from your first car, etc.)

Transparency: Finally, it is important that your system understandable to certain other people. Of course, if you’re sharing these duties with a spouse/partner, you both need to understand the system. You also need to be able to explain it to an auditor (should the tax man ever visit) and the executor of your estate should be able to easily understand how you process your documents as well.

We’ll dive deeper into all of these topics over the next few weeks. By the time we’re through, you’ll have an excellent, easy-to-manage filing system.

 

Also in this series:

Organize a first aid kit for the car

A first aid kit isn’t one of those things you think about until you need it and when you do, boy do you need it! You can avoid making a stressful time even more difficult by planning and buying a roadside first aid kit now. They’re inexpensive, easy to maintain, and compact. Here is what every driver should have tucked away in the car.

The right container

There are a lot of pre-made first aid kits available. Most are great, but I recommend building your own from scratch. Why? You’re more likely to know exactly what is inside a homemade first aid kit as you think about, buy, and place each item. You might glance at a pre-made kit’s contents, but the steps required for building your own force you to really think about what is inside.

Also, when you build your own kit you have more control over the container. Find something that has clear compartments, so you can see where items are. Also, if you can find something waterproof, that is ideal. This MTM Dry Box is a great example, as it’s durable, brightly-colored, and water resistant. Plus it’s small enough and study enough to live in the car’s trunk for a long time.

Supplies

When it comes to supplies, I defer to the professionals at the Red Cross. This comprehensive list, entitled “Anatomy of a First Aid Kit,” includes:

  • 2 absorbent compress dressings (5 x 9 inches)
  • 25 adhesive bandages (assorted sizes)
  • 1 adhesive cloth tape (10 yards x 1 inch)
  • 5 antibiotic ointment packets (approximately 1 gram)
  • 5 antiseptic wipe packets
  • 2 packets of aspirin (81 mg each)

There is a lot more, and I’ll let you read their full recommendations. If you’ve got a baby or kids who travel with you, make sure you have children’s versions of the listed medications.

You might also consider adding a basic first aid manual. Again, I look to our friends at the Red Cross for this. Lastly, consider things like a flashlight, blanket, tool to break a window, Here’s a look at what else to keep in your car.

As I said, a first aid kit is often overlooked. Take some time this weekend to get one organized. I hope you never need it!