Organized gifts for Father’s Day

Father’s Day is just around the corner so we’ve compiled a list of items that can help male parent figures of all types stay organized.

For dads who travel

Dads who travel might appreciate the UltraLight Roll Toiletry bag. It is It is a little smaller than most conventional toiletry bags but it is made from rip-stop nylon and weighs only 4 ounces (about 100g). It would be ideal for short business trips or weekends away at the campground.

The Mossio set of packing cubes are made of premium quality nylon and two-way zippers. They will help dad keep his clothing organized while travelling. They are also ideal for keeping sports bags and backpacks in order.

If dad travels for business, he’ll need to keep all of his receipts in order. This small expanding file folder has 13 pockets – ideal for keeping meal, hotel, and travel receipts separated and organized.

For DIY dads

For dads who like do-it-yourself projects, here are three gifts that might be appreciated.

The Professional Organizer by Stanley is great for organizing small items like nails and screws. The little yellow compartments can be removed and carried to the job site. They can easily be rearranged within the case. The transparent lid makes it easy to see and access the items. It can also be stored upright in small, narrow spaces and each object stays in its own container.

The MagnoGrip magnetic wristband, made from durable ballistic polyester and extra strong magnets will help keep nuts, bolts, nails, and screws within easy reach when dad is working on a project. No more dropping bolts and having them roll under the car!

Edgeworks’ mini multi-tool is definitely not a unitasker. Perfect for dad’s pocket, this one little pen-sized item contains a stylus, flat and Phillips screwdriver bits, a bubble level, and a ruler with both inches and centimetres. It’s also a cheery bright yellow.

For fitness dads

For dads who play many different sports, the Ultimate Sports Equipment Organizer will keep their baseball bats, lacrosse stick, basketballs, and cycling helmets in one place. This organizer is made from heavy-duty material and has transparent pockets so dad can see exactly what he needs when he needs it.

The BodyMinder Workout and Exercise Journal will help dad keep track of his fitness routine. He can build a schedule, monitor his performance, and see how he is progressing towards his goals.

If dad celebrates sports with commemorative baseball caps, he might appreciate a baseball cap holder to show off his collection as well as keep it organized.

The minimalist vegetable garden: growing things when you have no space

I grew up vegetable gardening. We had a 25 acre property that had been in my family for decades and my mother always planted a huge garden, full of enough squash, beans, potatoes, carrots, and Swiss chard to get us through the entire winter.

As a university student and an apartment dweller, I didn’t vegetable garden at all. When I got my house in Toronto, I tried it given that I had a large backyard and prefer garden to grass, but all I ended up doing was feeding the neighbourhood raccoons.

I’ve been in Spain a decade now and other than helping out a friend in his garden plot a few towns over, I haven’t done any vegetable gardening at all. My husband loves cacti and our balconies are half full of the easy-to-care-for plants, but he’s not into anything at all edible.

Maybe it’s age, or maybe it’s looking out the bedroom window and seeing a large garden plot down below, but I’m getting the itch to do some gardening of my own. However, decorative plants are so not my thing. If I’m going to garden, I want it to be useful and productive. I want to be able to eat what I grow.

Our balconies, though, are not that conducive to vegetables. We’re on the ninth floor and face an ocean-side mountain, meaning that no matter what the weather’s like, there’s a strong breeze whipping by all day long. Plus the protected balcony is too small and already occupied by the beloved cacti, so growing any edible plants there is not really an option.

What’s a wannabe apartment gardener to do then?

I thought I’d give vertical gardening a try. While we don’t have a lot of wall space, we do have quite a lot of ceiling and railing space to hang planters. Amazon has several varieties, such as Topsy-Turvy Tomato Planters that hang from the ceiling, or any number of hanging or self-supporting vertical planters.

I’m never going to get a full vegetable garden in, not even if I opt for square-foot gardening, but I think I might just be able to scratch that itchy green thumb of mine with a few dangling tomato plants, some wall-hugging herbs and maybe a zucchini plant or two elegantly hanging off the inside of the balcony railing.

Any suggestions? Do you have postage-stamp balcony gardens? How do you satisfy your urge to cultivate?

Using what you already own

In preparation for a dinner party I threw the other night, I brought down my sugar bowl off the high shelf of my cupboard. The bowl was a wedding gift, and it hasn’t received much use over the years. It’s attractive, though, and durable. I held it in my hands for a few seconds, and then decided that after the dinner I would store it in the same, easily accessible space in my cupboard as the salt and pepper shakers. Since then, I’ve reached into the sugar bowl for my morning coffee’s sugar instead of into the big sugar storage canister as I had been doing.

Reclaiming my sugar bowl started me thinking about other items in my house that I already own and store, but that I don’t use. I like to think of myself as someone who leads an uncluttered life, but I was shocked to find many things I store and don’t regularly use — things I could be using, and want to use.

What’s the point of having good china if it is never used?

I found a beautiful crystal vase in a corner of the cabinet under my sink. I don’t put out cut flowers often because my cats eat them and then puke them up all over the house. Dinner guests often bring flowers as hostess gifts, however, so the vase gets some use but not as much as I would like. The vase’s lines are simple and stunning. It, too, was a wedding gift. When I look at the vase I think of the person who gave it to us and smile. My solution? I went to my local craft shop and bought a gorgeous spray of silk flowers. Fake flowers, I should note, are not what they used to be. Unless you touch these flowers, you have no idea that they’re not real. Now, the vase that I love is out of the cupboard and being used.

I moved a chair out of the bedroom, where it was never utilized, and into the living room. A guitar that I had stored under the bed is now out and on a stand so that it can be picked up and played. I reconfigured my desk so that my sewing machine has a permanent place where I can use it without any effort. And, I also took to my local charity a number of items that I was just apparently storing for the sake of storing.

Are there items in your home that need to be reclaimed? Are you storing anything just to store it? Are you hiding things that you love? An uncluttered home means that there is a place for everything that you own, and that everything is in its place. What I learned from my sugar bowl is that some of the things that I own weren’t in their best places. Spend some time over the next few days evaluating your things and identifying if they are in their best place and if you’re using what you already own.

 

This post was originally published in June 2007.

Bound to clutter and time

A recent study from UCLA-affiliated social scientists paints a bleak picture of modern parents: beholden to clutter, technology, and stuff. Likewise, they found, many (if not most) rarely step foot outdoors and claim that a perceived lack of time drives a lot of daily decisions. It’s a study I can relate to, and that’s really depressing.

The study

The longitudinal study entitled, “Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century: 32 Families Open Their Doors,” (currently available at Amazon as a book) observed middle-class families in Los Angeles over four years. The results, according to the authors, are “disheartening,” and include:

  1. Many families rely heavily on prepared and frozen foods even though they only save an average of 11 minutes per meal. “They give me the illusion of saving time and energy,” said one participant, “and that’s almost as important.”
  2. Most families in the study rarely go outdoors, even those who recently spent money on outdoor improvements like a new deck. “That’s the backyard,” one mom said. “I never go out there.”
  3. Leisure time is spent in front of the TV or the computer.

One interesting revelation I found has to do with a family’s refrigerator door. Those that are cluttered with notices, magnets, papers and the like, often indicate a home that is in a similar state. (Read our article on dealing with refrigerator door clutter here).

That’s rough, but the most depressing and relatable bit for me was about 2-year-old Anjellisa Redfern. According to researchers, she has a great many toys. However, “…she doesn’t want to play with them,” said her mother. “She wants to be on the couch watching TV.”

Second screen? Try first.

In 2014, Jeff Bercovici wrote an article for Forbes entitled, “Using A Second Screen While Watching TV Is The New Normal.” He went on to describe the growing habit of glancing at a smartphone or tablet while watching television:

Watching TV while simultaneously using a smartphone, laptop, or tablet is on the verge of becoming a majority behavior worldwide.

Later that year, the New York Times noted the emerging “second screen marketing” efforts that were just beginning to happen, targeted at those who use a smartphone or tablet as the titular “second screen” while watching TV. It is interesting, but that’s not the behavior in 2017. The TV is the second screen, the smartphone is the first.

Every night in my home, a depressing scene plays out. We have dinner, almost never together, almost always within 15 minutes, almost always silently and almost certainly with each in his or her own chair, doing his or her own thing. When this non-family time is complete, everyone retreats to his or her room of choice with his or her preferred screen, not to be seen again until morning.

It’s killing me and I hate it.

I’m partly to blame as I’ve let it go on this long. Extinguishing this pattern will not be easy. There will be loud complaining. There will be rolling of eyes and harsh words. But it must be done.

Childhood is a window that closes at 18 years of age. That’s all you get, those 18 precious years. Then they’re off to work, off to school, off to adulthood, and whatever comes next. There is no time machine. You can’t go back. My kids are 12 and 14 years old. The window is almost closed. I absolutely will not sit with regret years from now because I did not make the most of being their dad. Because I lost out to apps and YouTube stars. Because Snapchat was more appealing.

If the modern American family is succumbing to clutter and technology, it’s time to revisit our priorities. The window on childhood is closing. Be there – really be there – before it does.

Weekend project idea: Clear clutter from your medicine chest

wall mount medicine chestFirst, before I get into the depths of this post, I want to say that you shouldn’t be storing medicines in your bathroom. Humidity is bad for your medicines, and most in-wall cabinets don’t have locks on them and can be accessed by little ones. So, you should begin your weekend project by getting a lockable chest that you can store in a closet or another dry place in your home for your medicines. This modern-style medicine chest with locking glass door mounts on the wall. If you’re worried about losing keys, a portable chest with combination lock is a good alternative.

Next, get rid of all drugs that have passed their expiration dates. Return medications, both prescription and over-the-counter types, to your pharmacy for safe disposal. You can also read our tips on disposing of unused medications.

combo lock medicine chestThird, clear out all items that are not actually medicine-related from your medicine chest and find proper homes for these items.

Fourth, evaluate your medicine chest for duplicates and missing items. You should have at least one thermometer, but not four (like I just found … how in the world do I have four thermometers?).

Finally, lock up your medicine chest and enjoy the rest of your weekend knowing that you helped restore sanity in at least one aspect of your life.

 

This post was originally published in June 2007.

Minimizing packaging clutter

Clutter doesn’t just come from things you buy (or are given) — it can also come from the associated packaging that sometimes winds up sitting around your home or office. That might be the manufacturer’s packaging or the packaging added by a company like Amazon.

Excess packaging is part of the problem. Sandy Barker wrote abut this on her blog, Off the Beaten Track: “My eye cream comes in an even more ridiculous array of packaging: inside a jar, inside a plastic shell, inside a box, inside shrunk-wrapped plastic.”

The following are some strategies for limiting the packaging debris that comes into your space and dealing with it when it’s unavoidable.

Choose products that minimize packaging

Amazon’s frustration-free packaging initiative began in 2008, and since then many more products have been added to this category. These products are easy to unwrap and the materials are fully recyclable. Toys, electronics, and such don’t need to come in those hard-to-open and non-recyclable plastic clamshells. An added benefit of buying a product with easy-to-open packaging is you’re less likely to procrastinate in putting it into use because getting at the product isn’t a struggle.

You can tell when a product, such as this Belkin surge protector, is part of Amazon’s program because the description says it ships in easy-to-open packaging, and you may be given the option of standard vs. frustration-free packaging.

Amazon also has its Ships in Own Container program, where the product ships in the box from the manufacturer, without putting that box inside an Amazon box. You can tell a product is part of this program when the product page says: “This item’s packaging will indicate what is inside. To cover it, select Ship in Amazon box on the checkout page.”

I buy my cases of toilet paper from Amazon because my local store doesn’t carry the product I want, and I appreciate that Amazon ships it without a second box that I have to break down and put in my recycling bin.

Of course, you can look for products with minimal packaging when buying from places other than Amazon. If you’re shopping at a local store, you can choose to buy products with less packaging than others. And you can look for companies like Green Toys, where “all products are packaged in 100% recyclable cardboard — no additives like blister packs, twist ties, or cellophane wrappers.”

You can also avoid packaging altogether if you buy from bulk bins using a refillable container. There are some stores that specialize in bulk purchases for things like cleaning supplies and shower gels, and many grocery stores have some bulk food bins.

Recycle what you can

Many packaging materials are readily recyclable: cardboard boxes, glass containers, etc. Some may take a bit more effort to recycle, such as packing peanuts. My local UPS Store takes these, and if yours doesn’t you may find another shipping and packaging store that will. And as we’ve noted on Unclutterer before, a number of cosmetics companies, such as Aveda, will take back any packaging (and accessories) that aren’t accepted by your local curbside recycling program.

You can also try offering packing materials (boxes, bubble wrap, packing peanuts, etc.) for free on places like Craigslist or freecycle, since people who sell on eBay or have other reasons to need packing materials may want them.

You may want to save some for your own reuse, perhaps for shipping off gifts. But be realistic about how much of this stuff you’ll really use.

If there’s no other good option, use the trash can

Have you ever bought a meal kit from Blue Apron, HelloFresh, Plated, or one of the many other such companies? If so, you’ll be familiar with the freezer packs that come with these kits. Blue Apron will allow you to mail them back for free, but in other cases you’re stuck with them.

And there’s really no good use for the multitude of packs you can acquire if you use such services regularly. As Kiera Butler wrote in Mother Jones, the companies are no help:

Many blithely suggest that customers store old gel packs in their freezers for future use. Unless you happen to have your own meat locker, that’s wildly impractical. I tried it, and in less than a month the packs — which are roughly the size of a photo album — had crowded practically everything else out of my freezer. …

As Nathanael Johnson at Grist points out, Blue Apron has also suggested that customers donate used freezer packs to the Boy Scouts or other organizations. I asked my local Boy Scouts council whether they wanted my old meal-kit freezer packs. “What would we do with all those ice packs?” wondered the puzzled council executive.

I know many people are loath to throw things like this in the trash, but that’s a better option than having them just sit around your house, unused and taking up space.

Book Review: A Simple Guide to Saving Your Family Photos

Like many of our readers, I find one of the most daunting projects is organizing and digitizing our family photos. Fortunately, when I was at the recent NAPO conference, I had the opportunity to speak with Mollie Bartelt, co-founder of Pixologie and author of A Simple Guide to Saving Your Family Photos. She gave me a copy of her book to review.

If you’ve inherited family photos or you just want to get your own photos organized and digitized, this book is for you. It is well written and easy to read. It provides advice on many different scenarios (family photos, a professional photographer’s collection, etc.). As well, the book explains how to incorporate physical photos and digital photos into one organized collection.

In the first part of the book, Bartelt explains how to get started. She describes the time, space, tools, and equipment needed manage this type of project. I was rather confused when I saw dental floss on the list of required tools. However, Bartelt goes on to explain that dental floss can used to remove photos that are stuck in old-fashioned “magnetic” photo albums. Sliding the floss carefully underneath the photos will unstick them without having them curl up at the corners. This makes it much easier to scan them.

Bartelt also recommends which photos to keep and which to let go. For example, to remember your family’s trip to the zoo, you can keep a photo of your children in front of the elephant enclosure. There is no need to keep a dozen pictures of the elephant itself.

Prior to organizing your photos, Bartelt suggests building an age chart for family members to help determine what year photos were taken. For example, if Charles was born in 2010, the photo of him beside a cake with six candles (his sixth birthday) would be from 2016, and we would know that he was in the first grade that year. Anne would have been four years old and in preschool.

When sorting photos, Bartelt provides suggestions on how to choose major categories and how to divide the major categories into sub-categories. She discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each method and provides real-life examples of projects that have used each method.

When it comes to digitizing photos, it is important to determine a file name methodology before the process begins. Bartelt has several suggestions but her preferred file name system is YYYY-MM-DD-description; where the description can be the event or people in the photograph.

Bartelt explains that for the digitizing process, all-in-one printer scanners can produce good quality digitized photos. However, using the flatbed option is very time consuming if you have a lot of photos to scan. Some scanners have an auto-feed function but this may damage photos because they are forced to bend around rollers before they are scanned. Pixologie, the company Bartelt co-founded, offers photo organizing and digitizing services. They use an E-Z Photo Scan’s Kodak PS80 Photo Scanner. This is a high-speed, straight-feed scanner that produces scans of very good quality. It is very useful for scanning many photos very quickly.

A Simple Guide to Saving Your Family Photos provides valuable information on recommended settings for scanning photos. Most family photos are scanned at 300-600 dpi as superior quality JPGs. Historians and professional photographers should scan at 600-1200 dpi as TIFF. She also describes how to store digital photos both on- and off-site and how to incorporate a digital photo collection into a recently digitized collection of physical photos.

If you’re considering a photo organizing project, whether it be your family photos or the portfolio of a professional photographer, I highly recommend reading A Simple Guide to Saving Your Family Photos before you start. You will save yourself a lot of time and effort by taking the advice offered by Bartelt.

Clutter-free patio furniture ideas

My house has a front porch that runs the full length of the front of the house. The view from inside the house is terrific and uncluttered when there isn’t any patio furniture clogging up the porch. However, there are times when I entertain when having furniture out there would be nice.

Faced with this problem of only sort-of wanting patio furniture, I eventually decided to buy two types of furniture for my porch. The first is what I call indoor-outdoor furniture: pieces that I can use inside my house 99 percent of the time, but that I can take outside without fear of damage from the elements. The second type is what I call temporary furniture: pieces that are inflatable, totally kitsch, and easy to store.

The dual-purpose seating I purchased (which is very easy to clean) helps me both inside with much needed seating and outside during social gatherings. The inflatable furniture easily stores flat when not in use on a utility closet shelf, and also has the bonus of being a great conversation starter.

When looking for outdoor furniture, consider keeping your yard or porch typically clutter free by only using outdoor-indoor furniture and temporary, inflatable pieces.

 

This post was originally published in June 2007.

What to unclutter when you’re expecting

Recently I was browsing the Unclutterer forums and I came across this older post: “Having a baby in three weeks but need to declutter first!” It immediately brought me back to the days when my wife and I were preparing for our new arrivals. We bought lots of stuff, and even used some of it!

We didn’t have any clothing, bibs, bottles, wipes, diapers, or blankets on our own shopping list because we felt we’d likely receive them as gifts. If you’ve decided to go without a baby shower, then you’ll want to add a few of these to your acquisition list.

As an anxious parent-to-be, you want to do your best for junior. So you hit the store with the best intentions, but end up leaving with a combination bottle warmer/lullaby library/cradle/Diaper-Change-O-Matic 3000. Don’t worry, it happens to all of us. Here’s what we found ourselves still using after junior’s first birthday.

Some people use a basic changing table with some storage, not unlike this one from Badger Basket. It’s nice to have everything you’re going to need – diapers, wipes, change of clothes, etc. – in one spot. But honestly, we ended up using a simple changing pad on a bed just as often. It was just quicker and sometimes speed is of the essence when diapers are concerned.

A convertible car seat is great to have as it can go from rear- to forward-facing as your child grows. They are heavy, but a worthwhile investment.

A trusty Pack N Play is versatile. Bring it with you when you visit grandparents, or wheel it into your bedroom if junior isn’t feeling well.

A good stroller is essential. Find the safest one that will still grow with your child, as these are expensive items. The quick-fold umbrella-style models are adequate for when you’re in a pinch, but I don’t recommend using one as your sole stroller. They offer no storage and can often be real hassle to fold up.

Finally, a diaper bag is a must. I couldn’t imagine going anywhere with my kids without a bag of essential gear, like diapers, wipes, etc. Again, you can go nuts here and get a bag that charges your phone and does a million other things, but a simple canvas tote works perfectly.

Preparing for a new baby can be both stressful and fun. Try to focus on the latter, and leave the Diaper-Change-O-Matic 3000 at the store. After a year, you’ll be changing junior on any flat surface you can find. And that’s OK.

When it comes to an organized home, does size matter?

I’m a longtime fan of TV home design shows, especially the Love or List franchises. I even watch them here in Spain dubbed into Spanish and several years out of date. As much as I love seeing the transformations, my main reason for watching the shows has nothing to do with the home makeovers at all.

I watch the shows because I love seeing the reactions of Spanish friends and family as the homeowners complain about their lack of space.

Having lived in both cultures, I understand both points of view. I grew up in a 14-room (four bedroom) house on a third of an acre lot. My parents retired to a 5000 square foot home with a separate guest house. My own house in downtown Toronto was over a 1000 square feet with 50×50 ft gardens in front and in back of the house. And half the time, I thought my house was too small for just me!

When I moved to Spain and came upon a completely different mindset.

My first apartment (which I shared with my now-husband) was 270 square feet and we lived there quite happily for over five years (after living there for two years and not killing each other, we decided that marriage was a definite possibility).

The flat we live in now is about 600 square feet and, to be quite honest, is more than large enough for the two of us (and whatever guests might be visiting). In fact, I’m now so accustomed to the size of living spaces here that I have no desire for a large place. When buying a second place for weekends and vacations, we looked at a narrow three-story house in the center of a village, but decided that it was too big, and I’m pretty certain it was under 1000 square feet.

In 2013, the website Shrink the Footprint published an article about average home size around the world and it seems to show that countries with lots of space tend to have larger homes (Canada, USA, Australia).

My Spanish friends and family ask me all the time why North Americans need so much space. “Doesn’t it just generate more clutter?” they ask.

Judging by the majority of houses featured in the typical home makeover programs, the answer seems to be yes, more space equals more clutter.

But, I’m not sure how true that really is. I’ve mentioned before the TV show Obsessive Compulsive Cleaners, and the majority of the people on the show who live in cluttered spaces have small homes in comparison with a typical North American house.

When asked that question, therefore, I explain that it’s all a matter of mindset and attitude. Yes, more space could encourage more clutter, but only if you let it. Just as a small space might cause someone to cram what he owns into every nook and cranny.

In other words, in my opinion, when it comes to being organized, size does not matter in the least. But that could just be me.

What about you? Is there a link between house size and disorganization?

Collapsible colanders save kitchen space

The colander is a utensil that finds its way into most kitchens. Unfortunately, many people sacrifice a great deal of cupboard space storing colanders. With diameters around 11″ and heights of more than 5″, the typical colander has a large footprint.

Regain some of that space by switching to a collapsible silicone colander. This colander, (similar to the one that I own), has a handle and is less than an inch flat when collapsed. There also is one on the market that doesn’t have a long handle and looks more like a traditional colander. It also is less than an inch flat when collapsed. This colander can also be used as a vegetable steamer!

If you like to have both hands free to pour from a heavy pot or to wash and peel vegetables, check out the colander with handles that stretch over the sink.

You can find all three types of colanders available in a package deal from Squish.

Let a collapsible colander bring more space and less clutter to your kitchen.

 

This post was originally published in June 2007.

Using wedding registries to avoid gift-related clutter

I have mixed emotions about wedding registries. On one hand, I tend to agree with Miss Manners, who recently wrote:

Registries are never proper, not for weddings, not for baby showers and not for birthdays. Not for christenings, bar mitzvahs, quinceañeras, sweet sixteens, graduations, engagements, coming out, announcing gender, changing gender, getting a job, losing a job, buying a house, divorcing, retiring or dying.

It is simply never polite to ask someone to buy you a present. Everyone is just going to have to go through life’s milestones without the explicit intention of reaping material rewards.

However, the practical part of me knows people are going to create registries, and they do help avoid couples getting gifts that get shoved to the back of a closet. If you’re going to create a wedding registry on Amazon or elsewhere, consider the following to help ensure the gifts you receive won’t become clutter.

You won’t develop a whole new personality after the wedding.

If you’re an introvert and throwing a fancy dinner party for 12 makes you shudder, it won’t suddenly sound appealing after you get married. If you tend to eat take-out meals and easy-to-prepare foods, you’re unlikely to become interested in gourmet cooking in the near future. So select items that match the person you actually are, not the person the registry checklists might presume you are. If your tastes and interests evolve later — as they certainly can, in unpredictable ways — you can get what you need for future-you when that time comes.

Consider the other members of your household.

I have cats who eat cut flowers, so vases would never go on my list. And any quilts and other such bedding needs to be machine washable, because hairballs happen. Consider what items may or not be appropriate given your specific family members. Do you need to avoid easily broken items? Are there medical conditions to take into account?

You still need to store the stuff.

Make sure everything you’re asking for will have an appropriate storage place in your home. And if you’re considering things you’d use once or twice a year — sports gear, Thanksgiving dinner kitchenware, etc. — consider whether or not you’d be better off renting or borrowing these items rather than owning them.

Consider items beyond the traditional housewares.

Your registry can incorporate consumables (such as wine) and experiences (such as museum memberships). Another option: Ask for donations to a charity of your choice. Rather than looking for cash donations, some couples have created registries of things they will turn around and give to local homeless shelters or other nonprofit organizations — making it clear to the gift-givers that this is their intention.

Add items to your registry as carefully as you would choose them if you were buying them yourself.

Are the items on your list things that you’ll love having in your space? Alternatively, are they just really practical items you need to have? (I once got a couple the paper shredder that was on their registry.) If not, consider whether they really belong on your list.