Disposing of unused medications

You may find yourself with unused medications for a variety of reasons. For example, your doctor could make a change to your prescription, or you may have medications that have expired.

How do you properly dispose of those medications? You have three options.

Donate them using repository programs

In the U.S., some states have programs for medication redistribution. Many of these are conducted at the facility level, allowing pharmacies and nursing homes, for example, to find alternatives to destroying usable medications.

However, some states have drug repository programs that will accept medications from individuals, as long as the medications are in their original sealed and tamper-evident packaging (such as blister-cards) and won’t expire in the near future. Missouri, Iowa, and Wisconsin are three of the states that have such programs. You can search online to see if your state has a similar program. Note that these programs cannot accept controlled substances, which include some pain, sleep, and anxiety medications.

Safely dispose of them using medication take-back programs

Take-back programs are a great way to safely dispose of expired or excess medications. In my area, there are drop-off containers at many police stations. Other locales in the U.S. use boxes from the National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators (with its Rx Drug Drop Box) or MedReturn, which have box locator functions on their websites. Some pharmacies also accept medications, and Dispose My Meds has a pharmacy locator.

You can also search for medications at Earth911 to find a disposal site near you. And you could check with your trash/recycling service provider to see what options are available in your area.

The Drug Enforcement Agency, along with local law enforcement organizations, used to hold an annual National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day. Because there are now more options for disposing of these medications — the law was changed in 2014 to allow for more authorized collectors — the DEA has no plans for future take-back days.

Other countries such as Canada and Australia also have take-back programs.

Safely dispose of them at home

The FDA has instructions on how to safely dispose of medications as part of your household trash if no better option is available:

  • Mix medicines (do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unpalatable substance such as dirt, kitty litter, or used coffee grounds.
  • Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag.
  • Throw the container in your household trash.
  • Scratch out all personal information on the prescription label of your empty pill bottle or empty medicine packaging to make it unreadable, then dispose of the container.

The FDA also provides a short list of medications that can be especially harmful if used by anyone other than the person for whom they were prescribed. If these specific medicines cannot be disposed of quickly using a take-back program, the FDA recommends flushing them down the toilet as soon as they are no longer needed. Specific disposal information may have come with the medicine, but the FDA also links to that information if you don’t have it. This is the only time when flushing is recommended. In general, flushing is strongly discouraged for reasons that the Environmental Protection Agency explains (PDF).

Unitasker Wednesday: Beer Mitt

All Unitasker Wednesday posts are jokes — we don’t want you to buy these items, we want you to laugh at their ridiculousness. Enjoy!

This week’s unitasker selection is just in time for all your Fourth of July celebrations. It’s perfect because it relieves your party guests from holding their SUPER HEAVY beers while they celebrate U.S. independence! And nothing says, “Embrace your lazy AND let’s remember that exciting day our country’s forefather’s nailed a declaration to a post in Philadelphia” quite like the Beer Mitt:

Look, Ma! No hands!

Thanks go to reader Dolphin for sharing this patriotic and pointless unitasker with us.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2014

2013

2012

2010

  • Organizing to foster creativity
    Creative personalities have the stereotype of being messy, disorganized people. When, in reality, the incredibly successful creative people of the world are often profoundly organized — they have to be to manage their work and schedules, so they can be ready when inspiration strikes.
  • Finish it! Erin’s third set of 2010 resolutions
    How are you doing with your 2010 resolutions? Even if you don’t keep resolutions, could you spend the next three months finishing all of the unfinished projects in your life? If so, join me on my adventure. My goal is to head into the fourth quarter of 2010 with more energy and less stress.
  • If it’s not important to you, don’t consume it
    When I read the book Voluntary Simplicity seven or eight years ago, I interpreted the focus of the book to be about reducing one’s impact on the environment. However, Trent Hamm of TheSimpleDollar.com points out in his review of the book that there is a larger theme beyond responsible environmental behavior that speaks to the heart of simple, uncluttered living.

2009

Organize a summer vacation with your smartphone

Last year I traveled to Orlando from Boston and managed every aspect of the trip, from packing to sending a thank-you card, with my iPhone. I rarely touched paper through the planning and traveling process and never felt unprepared or wanting. The following is how I managed a vacation with a smartphone (and you can, too).

Hardware

There are two pieces of hardware I needed for my journey beyond my smartphone. The first was a backup battery case. My choice was the Mophie Juice Pack. It’s sturdy, indicates its available power via LEDs, and has an on/off switch, so you don’t turn it on until you need it. The Juice Pack leaves all the ports and buttons available on a phone and charges up with or without the smartphone inside. I typically switch it on when my iPhone’s battery hit 20 percent, and turned it off once the phone was back up to 80 percent.

Don’t have an iPhone? No worries, Mophie makes battery cases for many makes and models.

I also brought an AC charger for the car. Nothing devours a smartphone’s battery like running a GPS app, so a charger is essential. Save the Juice Pack for later.

Book a flight

Kayak is my favorite smartphone travel app, available for iPhone and Android devices, and it’s what I used to book my flight. I launched the app, tapped Flights, and entered flight details (like originating airport, terminal airport, date, number of passengers and price range). Then, I tapped Search Flights.

Once I selected my flight, I booked through the app (but you don’t have to). Finally, I had the program email the details to me and a travel partner.

If you book your flight outside of the app, you can create a free Kayak account and email any confirmation emails to your special Kayak address. The details will appear in the “My Trips” section and the app does a stellar job of parsing the information into something useable. Having all your flight information in one, well-organized location is very convenient.

Packing list

I also used Kayak to create a packing list. There are many apps that can do this, but I like having things in one place. Kayak offers four list templates by default: Family, Business, Romantic, and General. Each features items that one might take on a family trip, business trip, etc. You can edit these lists or create custom ones.

Book a bus ticket

I live in the boonies, so I must take a bus to the airport. My local bus line isn’t the most technically advanced, but that’s all right. The schedule is available as a PDF, which I put into Evernote tagged: Florida. Now, I’ve got the schedule ready to browse anytime, even if I lose my Internet connection.

At this point, I had to touch paper. My bus line sells tickets with no electronic option.

Finally, I put copies of email confirmation from the airline and a photo of the bus ticket into my Evernote “Florida” notebook. It’s overkill, but it helps me rest easier. Now it’s off to the airport.

En route

Kayak does a great job of monitoring flight information, but there are alternatives. My favorite is Flight Update Pro. This app lets you create a Trip, and each Trip can have several flights. Flight information is very legible, and includes terminal and gate information, weather report flight maps, and even a seating chart. You can store your confirmation number, seat number, and any relevant notes.

The sharing options are great, too. You can send an email or a SMS to a travel partner with a tap of a button. There’s little to type, as the messages are pre-populated with flight information and status. Kayak offers easy emails, but not SMS. It’s a simple way to say, “I’m here,” with almost no effort.

There are other flight apps, and I’ve tried many. Honorable mention goes to Flight Card by Sylion. It’s less capable than the others, but very good looking and certainly well-suited to those who fly less frequently or aren’t as demanding of their flight apps. Again, if you have an Android device, you can do all of this with Kayak.

Driving

After a night at my parents’, it was time to drive to the destination, Universal Studios Islands of Adventure. I’d need a turn-by-turn GPS app for the two-hour drive, and Google Maps is my choice, available for Android and iOS. It’s been my go-to GPS app for years.

Park Map

Many amusement parks have apps for customers and some third-party developers have created them, too. Universal’s Islands Of Adventure – GPS Map with HP is a nice example of the latter. It provides a map of the venue with GPS directions, as well as points of interest such as popular attractions, restaurants, and restrooms. It’s not all-inclusive (many Disney apps include ride wait times, for example), but it is better than those oversized paper maps that typically get torn or lost. If you’re heading to an amusement park this summer, be sure to research park-specific apps that might be beneficial for you.

Photographs

Smartphones come with photo software that’s fantastic right out of the box, so you probably won’t need to look elsewhere. I do, however, like Camera+ by Tap Tap Tap for the iPhone. Its editing tools are quite nice.

Don’t forget to back up your photographs automatically so if your phone gets waterlogged or lost, you don’t lose your vacation memories.

Thank you notes

There’s a great app for making greeting cards from Android devices and another for iPhones. On your flight home, you can take care of the thank you cards and be finished with your trip except for your laundry when you get home.

What to do with unused school supplies

Now that school’s over, the kids are at home and all of their stuff is with them. Having a break from school is great, but what can be done with the half-used notebooks, stubby pencils, worn crayons, and more?

Notebooks

First, and most simply, use them. They’re good practice for your kids and their writing or maybe for keeping a summer journal. Have them draw on the pages or send letters to far-flung family and friends.

Another, less obvious idea is to find every half-used notebook that’s hiding in backpacks, on bookshelves, etc. Go through them and decide: is what’s written in here important? Do I want to save it? If the answer is yes, tear out those pages and scan them into the archive software of your choice (I prefer Evernote). If you’d rather not go digital, a quality three-ring binder will do the job as well. If the notebooks in question still have a decent amount of blank pages inside, consider donating them. Fiends of Pine Ridge Reservation is home to the Oglala Sioux Tribe, and often accepts donations of school supplies. Likewise, Operation Give helps members of the US military supply those in need with a variety of items, including notebooks, as does Project Smile.

Alternatively, old notebooks can be upcycled into scrap paper notebooks quite easily. Here’s a great tutorial from Instructables for making a handy scrap notebook to keep by your computer, on your desk, in the kitchen, or where ever you typically jot down quick notes. In this video, Martha Stewart describes a similar project that looks great.

Crayons

Kids love crayons until they get too small to use. It seems wasteful to toss them away. Instead, you can make them super appealing all over again. You can follow a tutorial that explains how to use some candy mold, your old crayon numbs and a microwave oven to make great-looking crayon characters.

Alternatively, send them off to Crazy Crayons, a service that essentially uses the above process to upcycle unwanted crayons and make them available again.

Pencils

One idea for those frustrating pencil nubs is to use them with a pencil extender. This clever little device does just what you’re thinking it does: holds the nub in a larger case that lets you continue to write until the thing is completely gone. This might be a unitasker, but if you actually use it then it won’t be a unitasker in your home.

If you’re willing to saw off the eraser, the pencil can be tossed into a fire. Also, the graphite can be a good “dry lubricant” for keys and locks.

Whatever it is you decide to do with old school supplies, just be sure to turn that after-school clutter into something useful or get it out of your house so it’s not still sitting in your kid’s backpack at the start of next school year.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2011

  • Love your laundry room
    A clean, uncluttered, organized laundry room is welcoming and makes doing laundry much more enjoyable. Additionally, an organized room speeds up the process so you spend less time doing what you may not enjoy.If your laundry space could use some attention, try these 10 steps to get it in order.

2009

  • Less mess in the music room
    When music is such an integral part of your life, you constantly look for ways to store and minimize what you own.

Being an organized recycler

Sometimes when you unclutter, you come across things that are of no use to you and won’t be of use to anyone else, either. These could be old worksheets from school, plastic folders for those papers that are disintegrating with age, paperback books that are so damaged that no one is ever going to read them, textbooks that are decades out of date, etc.

You may want to recycle as much of this stuff as you can. Those of us who have curbside recycling service have it pretty easy when it comes to recycling, and others have access to convenient recycling centers.

But often when people go to recycle, they aren’t fully aware of what items qualify for recycling in their area. As Susan Carpenter noted in the Los Angeles Times back in 2011, “What’s accepted in L.A.’s blue bins can be vastly different from what’s recyclable in New York or San Diego or even Long Beach.”

Can you put hardcover books in the recycling bin? You can’t in my city, but you can in nearby Palo Alto. And where my mother used to live, there was a nearby recycling yard that took hardcover books. Is shredded paper okay? It’s fine in some places (which may want it placed in a labeled paper bag) but not allowed in others.

So you’ll want to take the time to get familiar with the rules in your locale. These might come in newsletters from the recycling company, or you may find them on the company’s website. Sometimes there isn’t enough detail on the website, and you may want to call the company for clarification. And pay attention to notices about changes in the recycling program, since new technologies (and revised demand for certain materials) can change the list of items accepted for recycling.

Why does this matter so much? Because if you combine recyclable and non-recyclable items, you may wind up recycling none of it. As Aaron C. Davis at The Washington Post wrote about shipping boxes, “Don’t be lazy and leave the Styrofoam, plastic and peanut packaging in with the cardboard — there’s a good chance it will mean the whole box gets directed back to the landfill.”

Also, as Davis further reports, when a lot of non-recyclable materials wind up in the recycling bins, the recycling business becomes less profitable and makes recycling services considerably more expensive to the cities buying those services. In Washington D.C., “so much non-recyclable material was being stuffed into the bins that after an audit by Waste Management last fall, the share of the city’s profit for selling recyclables plummeted by more than 50 percent.”

One final caution: If your locale doesn’t accept plastic bags for recycling, please respect this. The bags can play havoc with the recycler’s sorting machinery. If you use a plastic bag to take things to the recycling bin, empty the bag when you get there rather than putting the filled bag into the bin. Plastic grocery bags can sometimes be recycled at the store where they were acquired.

Unitasker Wednesday: Butter Mill

All Unitasker Wednesday posts are jokes — we don’t want you to buy these items, we want you to laugh at their ridiculousness. Enjoy!

This week’s unitasker is straight-up confusing. I genuinely have no idea why someone would have a use for the Butter Mill:

Is milled butter a desirable thing? What does milled butter do that other butter doesn’t do? I don’t get it since you have to dirty a knife to cut the butter off the mill. Couldn’t you just scrape a knife along the top of a stick of butter and do pretty much the same thing as using a mill? Or run a stick of butter across a cheese grater? I DON’T UNDERSTAND!

It also seems to be a very messy process to push butter through a mill. The minute the butter reaches room temperature, this has to be a squishy disaster.

Honestly, a butter mill makes butter cutters seem less like the unitaskers they are.

Thanks to reader Laura for introducing us to this mess of a unitasker!

A year ago on Unclutterer

2014

  • Family calendars
    Using a calendar to which the whole family has access is important in keeping everyone organized and on track. It doesn

2011

  • Own This, Not That
    A reader asked if we had ever seen the weight loss books Eat This, Not That and wondered if we might be able to create something similar for uncluttering, so we took him up on the challenge.

2010

  • Will someone be able to use this before I do?
    Check your long-term storage spaces and see if there are things others might be able to use before you do. If so, consider getting these things out of your home and into the arms of someone who could actually use them with regularity.
  • Office upgrade: An extraordinary project for Wired magazine
    I was standing in author Steven Levy’s office holding a trash bag and asking him if I could throw away a crumpled business card I’d found at the back of his closet. Turned out, the card belonged to a current executive at a major tech firm, but was from a time when the guy was a nobody at another company. I told myself that if Levy decided to trash the card, I’d slip it into my pocket instead.

2009

Helpful smartphone apps for people with ADD

A few years ago, I was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). In short, I was thrilled; years of frustration were explained and I got a comprehensive plan for the future. Surprisingly, my smartphone is a part of that plan.

One of the reasons my iPhone is part of my comprehensive ADD plan is because it’s always with me and a lot better at remembering what needs to be done and when than I am on my own. Listed below are some of the apps and other practices that I absolutely depend on to help me focus and get things done. Perhaps they’ll help you or someone you know.

Before I begin, please note that any ADD treatment plan is multi-faceted and individualized, and typically involves input from a trained, experienced professional. This post is presented for your information only and not meant as medical advice. With that said, on to the apps.

Due: I have a terrible time remembering to do those little tasks that must be completed every day. I can write a note to myself, yes, but that’s an incomplete solution. How will I remember to read the list? Most of the time, I don’t. Or I lose the note. Fortunately, the answer is simple; have the list present itself to me at the appropriate time.

Due is that list. It’s a reminder app for iPhone and iPad that’s perfect for quick additions and relentless with the reminders. Due is not a calendar, a GTD solution, or a to-do list. It won’t sort items by context or project. What it does is answer the question, “Will you remind be about ____?” with a resounding “Yes.”

By default, Due pings and produces a dialog box at the designated time and every 60 seconds thereafter until I act upon it by either marking it done or putting it off. Due’s persistence won’t let me forget about the task, so I’m likely to either complete it or delay it if necessary. Also, delaying the deadline doesn’t affect the snooze function. Those pesky but immensely helpful reminders are also pushed ahead.

Evernote: Where Due is my short-term memory, Evernote is for long-term storage. Anything that I don’t need to act upon right away, but might need to refer to in the future, goes into Evernote. I get such a huge sense of relief knowing that I have all that information and, more importantly, that I know where to find it.

MindNode Pro: I’ve written about mind mapping before, as it’s my favorite way to brainstorm. When I get started, ideas just show up for me rapidly and without any organization. A mind map suits this tendency well, as I can just capture these thoughts easily and attach them to other relevant thoughts quickly.

These three apps go a long way to keeping me on top of what I need to do and capture the thoughts I have. Most importantly, they give me the peace of mind that I’m not missing something important, which is such an awful feeling (especially when it’s true). If you know of something else I should check out, let me know in the comments below.

Productivity with Henry Miller

I’m always eager to learn new ways to stay organized and productive. Often I’ll do what many of you do: read blog posts, listen to podcasts, and read books. Many people are doing great work in these areas today, which I appreciate. However, my focus on contemporary work often causes me to overlook fantastic advice from the past, which is why I wanted to feature a little helpful advice from someone from the past: Henry Miller.

Henry Miller was the American-born writer whose works Tropic of Cancer, Black Spring and Tropic of Capricorn, defined a new style of semi-autobiographical novel. Miller also wrote Henry Miller on Writing, in which he described how he set goals, stayed focused, and got stuff done. It included, among other things, a fantastic list of his “11 Commandments of Writing”:

  1. Work on one thing at a time until finished.
  2. Start no more new books, add no more new material to ‘Black Spring.’
  3. Don’t be nervous. Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.
  4. Work according to Program and not according to mood. Stop at the appointed time!
  5. When you can’t create you can work.
  6. Cement a little every day, rather than add new fertilizers.
  7. Keep human! See people, go places, drink if you feel like it.
  8. Don’t be a draught-horse! Work with pleasure only.
  9. Discard the Program when you feel like it—but go back to it next day. Concentrate. Narrow down. Exclude.
  10. Forget the books you want to write. Think only of the book you are writing.
  11. Write first and always. Painting, music, friends, cinema, all these come afterwards.

Henry is taking about writing, of course, but his ideas can be applied to almost any work you do. I also think some of his words could use a little interpretation. Since Henry is no longer around, we can’t ask what he meant, but I’ll do my best to decipher his list.

Number one is self-evident and frankly, something I struggle with. It can be so simple to work on another project to distract yourself from what needs to be finished. Number two was clearly along these same lines, but specific to what he was working on at the time he created the list.

I like number three and four. Recently I was sitting in front of my computer at 11:00 p.m. and, after three unproductive hours, called it quits for the night. I was miserable and producing nothing, so I stopped. The next day I had renewed energy and a new perspective.

Number five is a great point: You can always work, or be productive, even if progress on your intended goal seems to elude you. There is always something to be done, and it doesn’t always have to be creative. Being in a creative slump doesn’t get you off the hook.

I think number six goes back to number one: Don’t start (fertilize) “Project B” until Project A is complete.

Seven and eight are good perspectives because they remind you not to spend too much time in your head, which is especially easy to do when you’re working on a big and important project.

Nine is similar to his earlier points three and four. And ten is again very similar to one.

Finally, the idea behind eleven is to tackle the most important things first. When you have the most energy, focus that energy on the most important work you need or want to do.

There is solid wisdom to be found from smart folks who are long gone. If you search for it, you might be surprise at what you find.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2010