Home Forums Living Spaces Clothing Closets Wet workout clothes (ick!)

This topic contains 25 replies, has 23 voices, and was last updated by  ElbowRoom 6 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #159503

    My partner is a triathlete, and works out (intensely) at least once a day, usually twice a day. Needless to say, she brings home lots of very sweaty workout clothes, and we’re having trouble figuring out what to do with them. I also bring my own gross workout stuff home about 3x a week. We can’t throw them right in the clothes hamper, because they make everything smell and they stay damp for days.

    We live in a 500 sq. ft. apartment, so there isn’t really any space to hang things. We do have a big unfinished basement, but it’s a little damp.

    Any advice for dealing with this? Recently, she’s taken to laying the damp clothes out to dry on the floor, and it drives me nuts (it’s a never-ending cycle because there are new clothes every day)!

    Is doing laundry EVERY day the only solution? I really don’t want to spend all of my waking hours washing clothes! I worry that throwing them right in the washing machine to sit will lead to moldy clothes

  • #193579

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    Can you hang some hooks in your bathroom or the bedroom and hang their until they are dry. Then they could go in the clothes hamper.

  • #193584

    Nina
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    Do you have a shower curtain rail? I hang my t-shirts from the wash on plastic hangers. I also use a fold-able clothes-rack that should work well for workout clothes, like this one: http://www.ikea.com/ch/de/catalog/products/30176088

  • #193585

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    Hmm that could work if we hung them up on a rack in our basement. Unfortunately, I don’t think we can hang them in the bedroom or bathroom because we’ll have a constant stream of clothes hanging anywhere. But I like the rack/clothesline idea- I’ll see if I can do it in the basement!

  • #193592

    ojorojo
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    How about extra tension rods for the shower? I have two in the bathroom and they add hanging space for drying clothes.
    Or maybe investing in a small dehumidifier?

  • #193598

    lottielot
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    How many workout clothes do you need to make a full wash? I tend to wash it all together, but I probably wash workout gear about 3 times a week as we both exercise a lot. With a family of 4 I usually do at least a load a day, often 2, it’s actually easier to do a load every single morning than less frequently, you could do that if you have a machine with maybe a water saving cycle or something, it would make drying stuff easier too as small amounts would be easier to dry. Is it the washing or drying which bothers you? Could you both give the stuff a quick rinse before storing in something like a mesh bag?

  • #193600

    Ella
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    It doesn’t seem like that big a deal to do a small load of laundry every day (or a bigger load when you have your own clothes to add). From what you’ve described, you’re already spending a fair amount of time and energy dealing with the wet dirty clothes. Trekking up and downstairs to hang them in a damp basement wouldn’t ease the nuisance. So just put them in the washer, turn it on, and be done with the problem.

  • #193622

    Anonymous

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    I used to hang soggy clothes across the open doors of a lower-level bathroom cabinet (double doors that allowed the clothes to span the gap. They air out a bit and that night I threw them into the basket.

    Or you could take a cue from the 1970’s. When I worked at a fast-food restaurant in college, I would place the dirty uniforms in a 5 gal. bucket during my shower, use my shower water to fill the bucket, then rinse and hang the uniform off the shower curtain rail with a hanger. Done and done!

  • #193629

    snosie
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    I think Another Deb is onto something. If you the clothes that are damp are wet, they don’t seem to get the same nasty smell, so you could run the washing machine a little (so they are covered in water), put today’s clothes in, then tomorrow, more water more clothes, til it’s full, and then run it. Of course this only works for top loaders!!

    I understand your concerns about visual amenity, but you do use them a lot (and I’m assuming with all that working out, you’re not entertaining as often), so if you can become ok with a rack/hooks etc to air them, it might be the easiest option, to save the up/down with the basement or other alternative. I mean, it would be a constant stream, but when new stuff comes, some ‘old’ stuff might be dry and can be put in the hamper/empty washing machine.

  • #193630

    Anonymous

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    Snosie’s post made me think to drape the clothes off the washer for awhile. Or, hang them on a hook on the back of the door or on a doorknob to air dry.

    It all depends on where you live. My old Texas location was so humid that towels had to be laundered after each use so they wouldn’t mildew. Hanging them did no good. In Arizona, things finished in the washer feel almost dry when I get them out a few hours later.

    The shower bucket system I mentioned above was efficient. I could agitate the clothes with one foot as I showered, then rinse with the tub faucet before I got out. Pretty hillbilly, but I had no time or home laundry facilities and in those days I had better balance! You can dry them in the machine or hang them.

  • #193640

    Mimi
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    i would wash them every day. for me it is easier to wash and dry a small amount of laundry every day than taking care of smelly clothes. just throw them in the washing machine and wash a load in the morning or evening, as a rountine like cooking.you have to wash them anyway so you can save the time for drying before washing etc.

  • #193641

    lottielot
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    Yeah, I agree with Mimi, if you dry clothes before washing you’re making twice as much work for yourself. My other thought was my memories of when I used washable nappies for my kids. They are even more stinky than workout clothes! I just chucked them into a smallish bin with a tight-fitting lid, kept on top of the washing machine. Other mums kept a mesh bag in the bin if the bin was kept elsewhere and chucked the mesh bag straight into the wash. Either way, as long as you washed twice a week there was no real mould or anything. They also make biggish waterproof drawstring bags for the same purpose, you could buy one of these and hang it to store the dirty clothes, then put the whole lot into the machine. But either way, it sounds like you need to wash more frequently. Besides which, drying sweaty clothes before washing sounds like it will make your flat stink!!

  • #193664

    EraserGirl
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    i use towels to wash sections of the bathroom and kitchen floors…i feel your pain. I also have the same problem with work out clothes…

    Wet and dirty towels, i put in a trashbag in the hamper then the bag goes with the dry clothes to the laundry.

    Clothes that are wet AND dirty that can’t wait in a plastic bag to be done, get put to soak in a bucket in the tub filled with water and oxyclean – then i twist them them dry before i put them in clean trash bag to go to the laundry.

    Clothes or towels that are just wet not actually icky, get hung up over the tub to dry before they are put in the hamper.

  • #193672

    JuliaJayne
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    You could get a wall-mounted drying rack. Hand wash the workout clothes nightly (I too worry about your apartment smelling like a locker room).

    Here are some styles
    http://www.thefind.com/appliances/info-wall-mounted-clothes-drying-rack#page=2&local=0

    From Ikea
    http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/10177178

  • #193702

    Irulan
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    I agree that drying them first or hanging them in the basement sounds like more work than just doing a load every day.

    If you want to hang them in your shower, you could put a retractable clothes line in the shower itself: http://www.amazon.com/Honey-Can-Do-Retractable-Clothes-Clothesline-8-Foot/dp/B002CD5OEK

    If your shower is big enough, you could rinse the clothes while you are in the shower and then hang them on the line. This way they wouldn’t smell between washings.

  • #193743

    djk
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    I do the same as Anita. But I find that the best result is to buy an extra set and still wash small loads every day. Exercise clothes dry quickly on hangers, and I could not bear the thought of sweaty, stinky clothes hanging around. Into the wash!

  • #193853

    shebolt
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    Just get a hanger and put it somewhere that’s not in your way. Modern workout clothing dries quickly, unless you are working out in cotton (eww). Each day, you can remove the previous day’s (now dry) clothing and put it in the hamper before you hang the new stuff.

  • #193877

    bandicoot
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    could they go right into a bucket of water with a bit of white vinegar and then every second day, everything gets washed in the machine?
    i want to rant about the lack of clothes drying lines in apartments! who designs these things!

  • #193907

    Jackthetiger
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    There have been some good suggestions. I used to rinse them in the shower, then let them hang to dry over the taps. When they were dry, I would put them into the washing basket.

    After reconstructive surgery on both ankles, feet and achilles tendons, my serious exercise days are over. I now realise that running makes the ice fall out of one’s cocktail glass!

  • #193916

    chacha1
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    Lots of great suggestions, but I have another one. It’s kind of hillbilly too. Shower at the gym but get in while still wearing the workout clothes. Rub and rinse thoroughly, then strip them off and rinse again. Wring them out and put them in a waterproof bag to bring home, then hang to dry in your own bathtub or shower (an extra tension rod will serve this purpose nicely.

    The less often you use detergent, the longer the clothes will last (I’m assuming a triathlete uses performance garments and not Hanes tee shirts), and as long as you use detergent at least once a week you’ll kill any lingering microbes that could result in long-term funk.

    The speed of air-drying of course is extremely variable. In our climate, clothes are dry overnight. It may be the case for Aim4WhirledPeas that an overnight drip, and then a transfer to the basement may be most effective.

    The one thing I wouldn’t do is leave unrinsed clothes hanging around.

  • #195328

    Gypsie
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    @chacha1 – You might think it’s hillbilly to shower in your clothes but when I go on my week long bicycle rides, that’s exactly what I do. After riding 100 miles that day, I hope in the shower in my cycling gear. Wash them and me and then hang them to dry on my tent!

  • #212517

    Kahuhipa
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    As a laundry procrastinator myself I can sympathize with not wanting to wash them each time you come home from the gym. I design closets for a living though and have a suggestion for you. The ideal situation is if you had a professional closet system installed or were thinking about putting one in then you could incorporate this idea into the design. However, you could have it free-standing as well. Here goes…

    You need your damp, sweaty clothes to be able to breath so you don’t drop dead when you open the hamper. But at the same time you want to reduce the odor if left open. The idea is to install a wire hamper in something like chrome, oil rubbed bronze, etc. with grooves in it. Then buy some planks of cedar and drill holes at each end of the planks. Interlock the planks on at least one or two walls of the basket. Cedar not only repels bugs but it also absorbs moisture and odors. Here’s the trick though. Cedar loses its effectiveness after about 9 months to a year but you can bring it right back to life with a light sanding. Maintained once a year the cedar will help to absorb and reduce the odors in your closet from gym clothes. As an added bonus it gives off its own fresh scent which helps to mask any odors that escape.

    For more closet ideas and solutions feel free to check out our website at:
    http://www.organizedhawaii.com

  • #219345

    marie132
    Participant

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    I have a potential solution for your problem but for that you need a washing machine at home. What I do when I come back with sweaty clothes is I put them directly in the washing machine, until the next wash (could be the same day or 4 days later), and close the door. If it doesn’t dry, who cares, it’ll get washed (they always come out clean and smell good)!

    If you don’t have a washing machine, the only viable solution would be to soak the clothes in a bucket or hand-wash them everyday and hang in the shower or on the rack, which I do when I am away on vacation: it works out pretty well.

    Good luck!!

  • #219747

    ElbowRoom
    Member

    Wet workout clothes (ick!)

    Tho this is an older thread this folding clothes dryer might help, it folds flat when not in use. I use to hold towels after showering to let dry before putting in laundry basket:
    http://www.lehmans.com/store/USA_Made___Home___8_Arm_Wooden_Wall_Dryer___1211495#1211495

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