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    • #158931
      Gypsie
      Member

      A recurring theme on here is books and eReaders. And I’ve also noticed that quite a few of us have the same taste in authors. I am always looking for recommendations on what to read next and so, I am a member of http://www.goodreads.com/ Here you rate books you’ve read and can see what others are reading/have read and hat they thought. I like it because I can link facebook friends, email addresses, etc. I thought I would share.

    • #174694
      Claycat
      Member

      We are readers!

      Oh, thank you, Gypsie! I will definitely bookmark that! πŸ™‚

    • #174699
      jbeany
      Member

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      Oooh, that looks dangerous! I have too many bad habits already!

      My current list of books/authors I can’t get rid of –
      Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels series.

      George RR Martin’s Game of Thrones series, although I’m not all the way through yet.

      Paolini’s Eragon series – gee, I wish I’d had publisher parents to print my first novel at 17, too. (Just don’t watch the movie – baaaad!)

      I’ve kept the 3 Vanyel novels from Mercedes Lackey. I finally let the rest I had go, although I do make sure to get them all from the library as they come out. She’s got an overwhelming number of Valdemar novels and a lot of other series, all too much to store. I’ve started to do the same with Tanya Huff. I’ve only kept the 4 quarters series. The rest are all at the local library.

      I have all the Pern novels from Anne McCaffrey and her son Todd, as well as the 3 Pegasus in flight novels that started off the FT&T series. I let loose all the other series because I wasn’t re-reading them. She’s been so prolific that I would need one whole bookcase just to keep her series if I had them all.

      Harry Potter, of course. That’s like having a spare pot of chicken noodle soup in the freezer for when you just need some comfort food.

      Jim Butcher’s Dresden files series are my favorites. Even that I’ve done better with uncluttering, though, by not keeping all the short story compilations he’s contributed too. I’m not thrilled with the other series he writes, so I don’t usually even read that one.

      Rebecca Well’s Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, and Little Alters Everywhere,

      I’ve got a series of original Perry Mason novels from my Gram’s collection just because of the great graphics on the covers and the hysterically over-the-top titles. One of these days I’ll actually read them.

      And, of course, the entire Calvin and Hobbes Collection.

      As for stray books –
      Alice Hoffman’s Practical Magic,
      The What Not To Wear rules,
      and my Gram’s copy of How to Avoid Lawyers. (To put on my desk when I finish school and start working for one.)

      I’ve got several to-be-read stacks, either from paperbackswap.com or from thrift stores, but those only stay if I truly love them – most get swapped back out to the website or passed on to friends as soon as I’m done.

    • #174700
      Netleigh
      Member

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      Bookmarked, good to see it’s free.
      I had a look at Librarything but it only allows you to put in a limited number of books for free.

    • #174703
      Gypsie
      Member

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      @jbeany

      I’ve been meaning to get to the Game of Thrones series and really like the Paolini books as well. Completely agree on the movie. I was so disappointed. I’ve also read a lot of the Xanth series by Piers Anthony.

      I think if we were ever to meet, we’d become fast friends just based on books you (we) like to read. I didnt even know What Not to Wear had a book! Will have to look that one up.

    • #174706
      pkilmain
      Member

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      I’m checking it out as well. I’m more of a mystery/suspense reader than SF, though I love Harry Potter, and Diana Gabaldon.

    • #174707
      chacha1
      Member

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      I’m a mystery/suspense reader too. Complete collections of Dick Francis, Ngaio Marsh, Aaron Elkins’ Gideon Oliver series, Laurie R. King, Bruce Alexander, and Elizabeth Peters’ Egypt series. Among others. πŸ™‚

      But I also have A LOT of Star Trek (TOS) books in my closet, all of Julian May’s Pliocene Exile books + related titles, and read hundreds of SF novels in my teens & twenties. One of my great finds was an autographed first edition of “Cyborg,” by Martin Caidin, in a used-book store, for a couple of bucks.

      Oh, and the funny part is, I was so thrilled to find the hardcover first that I didn’t even realize the thing was signed until I got it home!

    • #174710
      jsights
      Member

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      @jbeany No one is done reading Game of Thrones because Martin won’t finish writing the [email protected]#*^$d series!!! (though I know what you mean.) Ugh, I’m so frustrated with him. I love the series, but it’s been 5 years since the last one was published. And all my favorite characters weren’t in that one!! He said that book got so long he had to break it into 2, making what was supposed to be a 6 book series 7 books. So I thought, if he’s almost done writing it, and just had to break it into 2 books, the next one should come out soon. WRONG! And as awful as my memory is, I’ll have to re-read them all anyway before I read the next one…if he ever publishes it.

      /end rant

    • #174712
      jbeany
      Member

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      @ Gypsie – The What Not to Wear is from the original Brit version of the show, by Trinny Woodall & Susannah Constantine. They have two actually – one based on body shapes, and one about appropriate clothes for different occasions. The first, just titled What Not To Wear is fabulous for decluttering your wardrobe. They have pics to demonstrate “Worst Skirt” vs. “Best Skirt”, etc, based on which figure flaw you want to hide – like big butt, no waist, short legs, etc. Snarky and funny and totally accurate.

      All my favorite conversations are with my Sci-fi addicted friends!

      I like and read a lot of other book genres as well, but I keep and re-read more sci-fi than anything else.

      @jsights – on the bright side, I don’t have to hurry and get through the rest of Martin’s series!

    • #174716
      lucy1965
      Member

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      Must-keep books:

      The “Star Trek” TOS novels by Diane Duane, John M. Ford and Margaret Wander Bonanno; the Duane books were the first I bought and put on my Nook. Because I am a geek. (Said Nook has an LCARS screensaver and wallpaper, and a black silicone sleeve. It’s probably hopeless.)

      Quite a few books by Ursula Le Guin, particularly “Always Coming Home”, my go-to book when my uncluttering gets stuck.

      Mercedes Lackey’s “Vows and Honor” series. I love that Tarma and Kethry come down with colds, have to replace worn-out clothing, do armor repairs and talk about things other than men, work or their Troubled Pasts.

      There’s . . . kind of an embarrassing amount of CJ Cherryh here. *blushing* And Terry Pratchett.

      The UK editions of Alan Titchmarsh’s gardening books, in hardback (gifts from friends)

      Nigella Lawson’s early cookbooks, especially “How To Eat” (although that’s now available as an e-book and I’ll definitely be getting a copy)

      The Complete “Calvin and Hobbes”.

    • #174718
      pkilmain
      Member

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      If you think readers are frustrated about the pace of Martin’s series, try being the ordering librarian who wants to keep her avid Sci-Fi readers happy, and is always checking and finding “oops, publication pushed back XX months” (or in one case over a year! Grrr. I know people love his books, but as someone trying to keep up, it was a nightmare. And then to keep the various series straight……

      Rant over.

      Love Calvin and Hobbes.

    • #174730
      SunshineR
      Member

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      So far as comic strips go, I’ll admit I’m a Far Side fan.

    • #174742
      lottielot
      Member

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      My 8 year old LOVES Calvin and Hobbes, he’s always reading this massive volume I gave him and reading out bits to me πŸ™‚
      I joined goodreads a while ago, but have been too busy to look for a while, am reading that book about typefaces and it sends me to sleep really fast. I read William Boyd’s latest recently (‘Ordinary Thunderstorms’) and thoroughly enjoyed it, one of my fave authors.
      I just uncluttered all my books, donated any I thought I wouldn’t read again and put the rest on new shelves in my room. There are actually very few, most new books come from the library and there aren’t that many books that I want to re-read all the time. One exception is my favourite book ‘Ladder of Years’ by Anne Tyler, which actually really speaks to anyone uncluttering as the protagonist unclutters her life completely by leaving her family πŸ™‚

    • #174749
      Kamakazi
      Member

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      Agreed on stuff getting pushed back. About five years ago I just started refusing to start series until they are done and finished. There is plenty of other stuff out there to read. I also have a big issue with the INSANE decompression in most fantasy/sci-fi series, but that is another conversation for another day.

      Have to agree with jbeany about the Dresden Files books. Just amazing. I am about 3 behind having been rereading the first 10 as I buy them on my Kindle. I would HIGHLY recommend it to just about any reader.

    • #174763
      spacadet
      Member

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      Wow, lots of sci-fi and fantasy fans here! I’m a GRR Martin fan too, also frustrated with the slowness of the series, but I’m hoping the forthcoming HBO series will distract me (and motivate him… he’s gotta write enough to keep generating material for the series if it’s successful).

      CJ Cherryh, What Not To Wear, Harry Potter, Mercedes Lackey in common too. Wish there was more LeGuin available on Kindle. I’ve read a couple of short stories of hers that I liked and want to read more.

      LOVE Orson Scott Card and HAD all his books in Dead Tree until I uncluttered a few which weren’t my favorite series. Go me!

      Just downloaded my first Diana Gabaldon on my Kindle (Outlander – it was free for a while), but I haven’t been able to get into it yet. Hoping it’s just a slow starter. Switched off to “A Reliable Wife” and will pick up Gabaldon again when bored. Tried a sample of Daughter of the Blood and it looks interesting enough to read the whole thing. Good to see some recommendations on here for it!

      The thing about having a Kindle is that I now have an incredible backlog of reading to do! My Kindle is TOTALLY cluttered with book samples, but at least I was able to create folders for them (one each for fiction and nonfiction). I’m getting pretty good at deciding quickly whether I want to someday read the entire book, or whether a particular selection just doesn’t speak to me.

      I’ll have to look into these Dresden Files y’all are excited about… they’re available on Kindle? Sign me up!

      BEST book I’ve EVER read? The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls. It’s an AMAZING and true memoir.

    • #174768
      Zora
      Member

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      I’m an sf fan but I read darker, geekier books I think. Like Iain Banks’ Culture series, Charlie Stross novels, Neal Stephenson, Vernor Vinge. But also Lois Bujold.

    • #174801
      spacadet
      Member

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      Kamakazi, I am interested to find out what you mean by “insane decompression”. I hope you will post again about it!

      Zora, I like dark books too, and I’m a total geek. I’m not familiar with the authors you mention, so I’ll have to go load some more samples onto my Kindle. Fun!

    • #174811

      We are readers!

      Dragons of Pern books
      Darkover books
      Canticle for St. Leibowitz
      For you Aussies: The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay!!!
      Robin Hobb – The Royal Assassin (Farseer trilogy)
      Again for Aussies: Shantaram
      And much much more

    • #174845
      Kamakazi
      Member

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      spacadet: First of all I should say I am sure many people will disagree with what I am about to say. But here it goes.

      I find decompression to be a serious issue in modern fantasy series. Basically when I say decompression I mean the author has no sense of the fact that sometimes, less is more. An example I would use would be Goodkind’s Sword of Truth series. I read the first few volumes and I have say they would all have been more enjoyable if they were half as long and more tightly edited. This phenomenon seems to be everywhere in fantasy/sci-fi as well, so I don’t want it to sound like I am just picking on Goodkind. I think it is something that has just been building as it always seems like each author things they need that 25,000 page series of books that is their opus. Then it seems like half the time the series never ends anyway, and it just keeps going and going because the author refuses to give it any sense of finality.

      I should say though since people buy them, it isn’t entirely the author’s fault. I just know I won’t be reading many of them.

    • #174850
      Claycat
      Member

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      Needtocleanhouse, I love The Power of One! That’s one of the keepers I have on my bookshelf!

    • #174853

      We are readers!

      Claycat: Sequel = Tandia (order off Amazon; this and many other of his books aren’t published in USA so have to order on line – Amazon or off his website: brycecourtenay.com – I especially liked Potato Factory as well) I think Power of One will eventually become widely recognized as a classic. Yea Peekay!

      The book is loosely based on Bryce’s life so all those incredible things really happened to him. He wrote it as a practice book; it was his first book and he had done the research and found it was the 4th book that was published, so he was practicing first person in the first book – got published by a fluke. He’d been using the original as a doorstop.

      My understanding is that the boys at Eaton College (think Prince Charles et al) read the book – that it’s passed around/spread by word of mouth; so that when Bryce spoke there he asked “Has anyone here read the Power of One?” and all but 5 or so hands went up(!)

      The reason he moved to Austalia is that when he left SA on a scholarship to university in England the SA government told him to never come back and if he did he’d be arrested (I think because he’d started a school to teach blacks to read and write – that was apparently against the law back then – and when the government shut it down he started a correspondence school in five african languages).

    • #174861
      Claycat
      Member

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      Thank you for that interesting info, needtocleanhouse! πŸ™‚

    • #174866
      chacha1
      Member

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      Kamakazi – did you know that in the early days of novels, publishers would pay authors for the full rights to the book, but by VOLUME? So it was to an author’s advantage to write multi-volume sagas. My thesis was on Frances Burney, who started with a nice little one-volume romance in 1778. It was a hit and her publisher requested another. In order to make some money on her writing, Burney wrote three big fat multi-volume affairs. It seems some of the SF writers may do the same.

      I agree with you about the necessity of good editing. It can be enjoyable to be totally absorbed by a book that has such a complex story, with so many characters and so much going on that hundreds of pages are really required; but all too often, the 1000-page book has about 200 pages worth of story, and the rest is just the author killing time (ours).

      I am 100% committed to any author’s right to write whatever they want, and if they can get it published, more power to them. But as I get older, it’s story and character I want – and a good writer just doesn’t need a million words to convey those.

      So I’m curious, Kamakazi – given its voluminous size, how do you feel about the Harry Potter saga?

    • #174871
      jbeany
      Member

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      Sci-fi hasn’t cornered the market on insane decompression – Try the last couple books in Auel’s Clan of the Cave Bear series!

    • #174873
      spacadet
      Member

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      Kamakazi, thanks for the explanation! I can see what you mean. I’ve read series where the first book is tightly edited, and the rest go downhill from there. On the balance though, I generally like long books. I read quickly and am disappointed when a book only lasts me two days.

      I’ve been meaning to read some more Goodkind. His family is a friend of my grandparents, and I got a personalized, signed first edition of Wizard’s First Rule for Christmas one year. I thought it read like a first novel and pretty much dismissed him, but I understand he’s gained quite a fan base since then, so I thought I’d give him a second chance. It’s not real high on my list, though…

      Interesting historical perspective, Chacha. It does seem like genre writers are more likely to write serialized work, or spinoff short stories, than “serious literature writers.” I suppose maybe it’s an artifact of that side of the business.

    • #174973
      Gypsie
      Member

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      Speaking of multi-volume series, has anyone read Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series? It took me forever to get into the first book. Once I did, I really enjoyed it. And then I had a hard time getting into the second book and I stalled right there. I have friends that LOVE the series. Someday I will try it again. I just cant wait too long between books.

    • #174977
      irishbell
      Member

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      James Lee Burke
      Dennis Lehane
      Greg Iles
      Robert Crais
      Michael Connelly
      John Hart
      J.R. Rain
      P.J. Tracy
      John Sandford
      I like mysteries…

    • #174980

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      Irishbell: I like mysteries too, and used to work in a mystery bookstore. You seem a little more hardboiled than I am πŸ™‚

    • #174983
      pkilmain
      Member

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      Oh yay, more mystery readers. They’re my favorite:

      John Sandford
      Elizabeth George
      Tess Gerritsen
      Peter Robinson
      Some David Baldacci
      Anne Perry
      Deborah Crombie
      and more….

    • #175001
      jbeany
      Member

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      My mystery favs – Rita Mae & Sneaky Pie Brown.

    • #175003
      bandicoot
      Member

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      i don’t read fantasy, but i am addicted to robin hobb.
      i love everything of hers except for the soldier son trilogy, which i really tried and persevered with, but loathed it.

    • #175004

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      Robin Hobb has an incredible imagination; and a steel trap mind! She writes EPIC science fiction fantasy trilogies followed by trilogy sequels preceded by trilogy prequels. Haven’t read the soldier son trilogy. I like Assassin’s Apprentice the best so far. Like Rawlings, she combines elements of mystery/thriller in her books, a genre I generally dislike.

    • #175017
      irishbell
      Member

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      Susanintexas: yes,I like a little bit of twistedness in the books I read.

    • #175020
      mugwump
      Member

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      For those of you who want short books, try

      http://www.rinkworks.com/bookaminute/

      .
      They are hilarious.

      I like Robin Hobb, but I get a little tired of the emotional hysteria that her characters seem to get into.
      Robert Jordan was too tedious for words.
      Terry Goodkind was good for a few books, but I got bored eventually. (Is there a theme here?)

      My favorite author is Lois Bujold. Also Katherine Kerr (13 books in the series, which just finished last year).

    • #175022
      Kamakazi
      Member

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      So I have to say, I am about halfway through the most recent Dresden Files book, and at this point I would have to claim this series as probably the second best book series I have ever read (nothing will ever eclipse LOTR, ever, ever). It breaks my “don’t start series before they are done” rule, but since a new book comes out every year pretty consistently I am not too concerned.

    • #175090

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      mugwump – thanks for the link! Funny!!!

    • #232207
      Jackthetiger
      Member

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      Thanks for bumping this Klutzgirl. I had also missed it.

      Not a SciFi fan here, but I do share the frustration of waiting for the next book in a series. I read two books in the Ibis Trilogy by Amitav Ghosh (Sea of Poppies and River of Smoke). The third has been promised for over a year and the date pushed back again and again. What is he doing to us??

    • #232211
      glossta1
      Member

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      If you are looking for new authors you can type the name of an author you like into http://literature-map.com/ and it will give lots of other authors who are ‘similar’. It’s done map-style, so that those authors deemed most similar are closest on the map, and so on. It is really clever, and has not let me down yet.

    • #232212
      liag
      Member

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      Wonderful idea for a thread! I love British contemporary women fiction authors such as Margaret Drabble and Iris Murdoch. Jodi Poccult and Maeve Binchy in the past. Now read Elizabeth George, Susan Hill, _____ (drawing blank) Berg. Still re-reading John Updike and Saul Bellow, John Keats and favorites of all time, Richard Wright, Charles Dickens, and Samuel Beckett. I had better stop.

    • #232213
      liag
      Member

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      It is Elizabeth Berg.

    • #232229
      Nina
      Member

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      Klutzgirl – if you enjoy Game of Thrones you might like Joe Abercrombies books. They are similar in that they are fantasy but feel realistic. Maybe a bit more bloody then the George R.R. Martin books but his first law series (3 books) is amongst the best books I’ve read in recent years.

    • #232241
      lucy1965
      Member

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      Who am I reading now — N. K. Jemisin, Martha Wells, Kate Elliott, Seanan McGuire, K. Tempest Bradford, a reread of the earlier books in the Liaden Universe by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller (digital books FTW!), a reread of The Left Hand of Darkness (and being glad that I can’t easily edit the text, because there would be gender-neutral pronouns all up in that thing and yeah, yeah, book nearly as old as I am and primacy of the text and GETHENIANS DON’T HAVE INNATE GENDER, DAMN IT)(I maybe get a little exercised about that)(and yes, Genly Ai is only about as old as my kid at the beginning of the book, he STILL needs a punch in the snoot) . . . .

      I possibly have some feels about this. *grins* I like to think of LeGuin getting a few years away from the book, rereading it, facepalming and writing “Coming of Age in Karhide”; I’ve also enjoyed thinking of her seeing the results of this study and having a quiet cup of Vindication Tea at her desk.

    • #232243
      pkilmain
      Member

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      Reading now, actually rereading Peter Robinson, since I found that BBC has done a series called DCI Banks based on the books. I like it but had to revise my imagined physical description of the characters.

    • #232244
      Rosa
      Member

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      Lucy, have you seen the essay LeGuin wrote in the late ’80s or early ’90s about gender in LHoD and how she would do it differently if she’d written it later? It’s in a collection she put out in like 1989 I think, it’s very validating to all of us who would like to change the text.

    • #232251
      lucy1965
      Member

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      Rosa: Dancing At The Edge Of The World, “Is Gender Necessary?” And you’re quite right, it’s an excellent essay, in which she addresses her change in attitude towards gender-neutral pronouns — and I’d really like to read an edition that uses the ones she devised!

    • #232252
      Anonymous
      Inactive

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      I am also a big fan of Terry Pratchett. His early-onset Alzheimers is sad news but he seems to be working hard to produce as much as possible before it is too late.

      Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series inspired me to find the places mentioned in the book when I was in Scotland. I love that she was a research biologist before writing fiction. She lives in my area and I see her speak whenever I can at ComicCons and book releases.

      I am hooked on George R.R. Martin’s books. Any minute now the second series of
      the TV production will hit Netflix for me to see.

      My latest kick has been in history of Science genera books. I am reading “The Disappearing Spoon” which is all about the elements (as in Periodic Table elements. Also Neil DeGrasse Tyson’s “Death by Black Hole” and “Napoleon’s Buttons”.

      Nowadays I can listen on tape thanks to library and Audible.com. This makes it easier to multi-task yard work or scrapbooking with brain work!

    • #232261
      clutterbug22
      Member

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      klutzgrrl,

      Dh is reading Game of Thrones this very minute as I type! And he is a big fan of Terry Pratchett.

    • #232262
      chacha1
      Member

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      A general recommendation: “Libriomancer” by Jim C. Hines. Trust me. πŸ™‚

    • #232265
      clutterbug22
      Member

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      I’ve just finished reading today ‘Wild’ by Cheryl Strayed about her lone walk up the Pacific Crest Trail. It was a ‘finding oneself’ trek after the early death of her mother and then Strayed’s subsequent divorce from her husband. A very satisfying and enlightening read.

      (Have also read Bill Bryson’s ‘A Walk in the woods’ about his trek along the Appalachian Trail, the other side of America, another recommended book about taking in the natural environment and pushing oneself to keep moving on when the going gets hard. Love Bill Bryson, now his books I will not unclutter!)

    • #232271
      Katt
      Member

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      @klutzgrrl, the Golden Compass books are wonderful. Well, the first one is stellar, the second is very very good, and the third…well, I had to know how things ended so I did finish it. The audio version is especially stunning, it’s read by a cast, with Pullman doing the narrative bits. I used to listen to audio books when I went walking, and I swear I could have walked halfway to Ohio–they were that good.
      Not sure how old your son is, but the Rick Riordan books are a lot of fun. They are based on mythology and you end up learning a good bit–there’s a Greek series, an Egyptian one, and a Roman one as well. There’s pretty much nonstop adventure, so they’re a bit like a video game that way.

    • #232279
      lucy1965
      Member

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      @chacha: ah, Jim Hines. I adore him. He’s so twisty! *laughs* (If you’re wondering why the laughter, here’s a good place to start.)

    • #232288
      Anonymous
      Inactive

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      clutterbug, I also love Bill Bryson. I think his “Short History of Nearly Everything” was what got me started on scientific history books.

      Laetitia, I agree that some of the Pratchett books were a disappointment. My favorite was “Thief of Time”. I am starting over on the early ones so I can enjoy them at a more deliberate pace, since I read them so fast when I first discovered him. Since visiting the UK two years ago, I think I’ll get a fresh perspective on his jokes as well.

    • #232347
      Joless
      Member

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      @clutterbug – Wild is on my list of to-reads. I love travel and adventure books and have read many on climbing and expeditions and so on. Armchair escapism I think!

      Has anyone read the Robert Asprin books? I enjoyed those, though I don’t think they have as many levels as the Discworld stuff and I suspect many would consider them bad ‘copies’?

      I couldn’t get on with the golden compass stuff, but I enjoyed HP as an easy read. I used to read a lot more but have got lazy recently. I must start looking for more gripping things to read.

    • #232372
      lucy1965
      Member

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      @Joless: I have, but it was years ago, and more the Thieves’ World series than [i]MythAdventures.

      I have not started C.J. Cherryh’s Foreigner[/i] series yet. That is a whole bunch of new books. *grins, rubs hands together*

    • #232400
      Rosa
      Member

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      Lucy, good citing. I swear I’m not even 40 yet and I can’t remember the name of ANYTHING, it’s terrible.

      Klutzgrrl has your boy read Lloyd Alexander? The Prydain Chronicles are right up that Giant Fantasy YA alley but they’re also very good.

    • #232408
      Ella
      Member

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      “The Woman in White” (1860) by Wilkie Collins was my sickbed companion for the past week. This was an important “sensation” novel of the Victorian era, and supposedly the precursor of the modern detective novel, according to the Oxford Companion to English Literature. Very compelling reading, perhaps too compelling, as I should have been sleeping and getting better instead of devouring the book till all hours and getting sicker.

      Now I’m revisiting “The Phantom Tollbooth.”

    • #232415

      We are readers!

      Ella: I adore Wilkie Collins. I wrote an essay about him to accompany a book I edited of classic novellas about the death penalty. It’s online at http://1.salsa.net/peace/ebooks/essays-endoftheline.pdf. The Wilkie Collins chapter starts on page 19. He was an interesting man.

    • #232416
      clutterbug22
      Member

      We are readers!

      Ella,
      I loved reading ‘Woman in White’ and I agree it was very compelling reading. Like you, I stayed up half the night reading the story, (I think I was meant to be writing a university essay as well!)

    • #232417
      liag
      Member

      We are readers!

      Phantom Tollbooth!! My love for YA books is shared, then. Some titles of books I love, love, and have nearly memorized due to having read them aloud to reluctant–to say the least–readers: Where It Stops Nobody Knows aka Joy Ride, by Amy Ehrlich (omg, makes me cry every time; have read it gazillions of times. Please read it.), Also Things Not Seen–weird premise, but so well done!! Can’t remember author just now. How about Avi’s Wolf Rider–grabbed even the thugs, who begged for me to read to them!

    • #232418
      liag
      Member

      We are readers!

      Things Not Seen is by Andrew Clements. The Westing Game. From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. All 100% Great in so many ways. I am so excited that maybe a couple of yo will read some of these, or already have. This means more than even decluttering like a maniac.

    • #232439
      s
      Member

      We are readers!

      I enjoyed Asprin’s Myth series. Fun! And Asimov’s Foundation series. And Dragons. And…. I seem to be gravitating to more non-fiction now, though.

    • #232447
      Ella
      Member

      We are readers!

      Susan: Thanks for the link to your fascinating essay! I knew a bit about Collins’s life but not his views on capital punishment. It’s interesting to note (*caution: spoiler alert, for anyone who hasn’t read the book*) that Collins punished both of the villains in “The Woman in White” by horrible deaths — not directly at the hands of the hero Walter, but certainly as a result of Walter’s investigations.
      Also, two main characters were born out-of-wedlock — one of the villains as well as the woman in white — and Collins fashioned wretched lives and deaths for them both, which is a curious treatment from an author who fathered three illegitimate children of his own.

    • #232456

      We are readers!

      Ella — glad you enjoyed it!

    • #232479
      liag
      Member

      We are readers!

      Anyone into Penelope Lively’s books? I discovered her late and lately. How It All Began blew me away, first time in years.

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