Home Forums Welcome Hello! Legal terms on Music CD/ Movie VCD collection (enter a country)

This topic contains 10 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  nws2002 8 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #159107

    lgmost
    Member

    I have some collection for music cd and movie vcd. I want to gather them and burn into DVD and get rid of them. I wonder if I would be challenged for the airport checking (customs). Or should I make into harddisk, will they ask to check the harddisk and how can I explain to them?

    Does anyone have experience about moving to other countries/places?

  • #179828

    Vivace
    Member

    Legal terms on Music CD/ Movie VCD collection (enter a country)

    It’s not like they can check and see if you have the DVDs in a storage unit or a family member’s garage. It’s not illegal to rip something or even burn yourself a backup copy as long as it’s for personal use.

    I have all kinds of downloaded video and audio on my computer’s hard drive and I’ve never been asked to even turn my computer on at the airport. I’ve heard of computers sometimes being required to prove their real computers and turn on.

    If you’re really worried about it, label the DVDs “Photos” or something so they look innocuous. ;P

  • #179861

    Parsifal
    Member

    Legal terms on Music CD/ Movie VCD collection (enter a country)

    Don’t worry about it. When they ask you if you have any DVDs at the airport, they’re just looking for a ‘suspicious’ reaction so they can pull you for a ‘random’ search. It’s security theater, plain and simple. The likelihood you’ll get harassed for having a few burned DVDs in your carry-on luggage is pretty much nil.

    Caveat: I live in the US. YMMV.

  • #179884

    chacha1
    Member

    Legal terms on Music CD/ Movie VCD collection (enter a country)

    The rules for the U.S. are functionally the same as Australia and most of Europe. A single “back-up” copy for your personal use is considered fair use. Playing a copy for educational purposes is fair use. Copying anything so that you can sell the original is NOT fair use, and copying anything for the purposes of entertainment for which third parties pay is NOT fair use (e.g. screening a video at a bar with a cover charge).

    If you are copying media to a computer system, you need to keep the original media to stay within the letter of most international copyright law. Reason being, purchasing media is not the same as purchasing the original work; owning a commercial copy of a DVD or CD is not the same as owning the master film or tape. Owning a commercial copy does not convey unlimited rights; it conveys a limited license to *use* the content recorded thereon. Same as with buying a print of an artwork: the artist still owns the original work, you just have a copy to hang on your wall, and if you choose to make a photocopy, you can’t legally sell that photocopy unless you substantially alter it and market it as an adapted work. Even there, you can get into trouble – as with hip-hop artists who got sued for using too many “samples” in their tracks.

    For the purposes of travel, copied media that is in your possession is not likely to cause you any problems as long as there is no attempt to present the copy as original (as with illegal bootlegs made for sale; they always bear some facsimile of the original packaging). A home-made disc with a handwritten label that says “in-flight entertainment” is not going to cause you any trouble. A briefcase full of DVDs … maybe. Because the inference could be drawn that you are transporting them for the purpose of selling them.

    If you are moving from one country to another, you need to plan to move your original media, not just the copies, to stay within the letter of the law.

  • #179886

    B-200
    Member

    Legal terms on Music CD/ Movie VCD collection (enter a country)

    Not legal in Sweden you have to keep the original to be allowed to store them on say a hard drive.

  • #179889

    pkilmain
    Member

    Legal terms on Music CD/ Movie VCD collection (enter a country)

    Sounds like most places have similar laws. When I worked at the library we had to have a license to show videos to groups even if we weren’t charging for it. It was not expensive ($100 – $150 USD per year)and covered most of the larger commerical US producers. We also bought a series of foreign films which came with the licenses necessary and we ran a foreign film program once a month for 10 months of the year – very popular.

  • #179931

    lgmost
    Member

    Legal terms on Music CD/ Movie VCD collection (enter a country)

    Thanks all for the information~

  • #179937

    Periwinkle
    Member

    Legal terms on Music CD/ Movie VCD collection (enter a country)

    I believe in the UK, from when I looked into it about a year ago, that you’re actually not allowed to rip at all – something to do with you only owning the right to the CD itself and not the music on it :/

    Didn’t stop me from ripping nigh on 1000 CDs though 😛

  • #179970

    nws2002
    Member

    Legal terms on Music CD/ Movie VCD collection (enter a country)

    The only law I know of in the US that would limit ripping to a harddrive or making a copy is the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. This law prohibits you from bypassing copy prevention technology, which is commonly found on commercial DVDs.

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