Home Forums Living Spaces Clothing Closets Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

This topic contains 107 replies, has 44 voices, and was last updated by  bandicoot 6 years, 11 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #159655

    I love reading/getting tips on how to get me and my spaces better organized. So far I am also finding that the tips or advise that make me uncomfortable or have my mind go into a WHAT????mental blank feeling are usually the ones I need to really take note of(even small ones). My laundry has always been an issue, I have no trouble keeping it clean, but it never or rarely gets put away. This morning it was suggested to get rid of/or at least temporarily put away ALL of my laundry baskets. (GASP) Is it possible that what I have considered as helpful tools have actually hindered me into mentally using them as the “home” for my laundry and that is why that is as far as they get? Do you find laundry baskets helpful tools? Have any of you been able or needed to get past the “they are clean but just need to be put away” step?
    Chele

  • #200271

    ninakk
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I just folded laundry and since I have no basket it’s supposed to go directly to the closet from the drying rack. Sometimes I pile it but I’m trying to work folding and putting away into one task; without one there is not the other. It’s the same as leaving a q-tip on the sink instead of bending below it to chuck the q-tip in the trash *rolls her eyes* I have many more examples of where mid-stations are not good at all, but where I should drive the train all the way to the end of the line.

  • #200273

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I went through this with dishes too, they would make it to the dish drainer and I would just use them from there….never seemed to actually get put away.(I don’t have a dishwasher) Anyway, someone suggested to get rid of it altogether…another traumatizing suggestion at the time, but I did get rid of it. Went to a folding one and set it on a drying mat on the table(which I do keep clean). This has ended up being a great help…no dishes just setting out. I feel like there is a seat with my name on it in the “mid-station” dept…..

  • #200275

    lottielot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have one smallish laundry basket which I wouldn’t be without, but my aim is always to keep it empty! So I take the wet washing upstairs or outside and put the dry stuff in it ready to go to the final home (in the bedroom for dh and I, into tiny baskets for the kids to put away themselves). Occasionally the dry laundry will pile up, but that’s a function of not keeping on top of it, not the basket’s fault. I finally conquered laundry by ensuring I do some every single day without fail. That really helps, plus the goal of an empty basket.

  • #200279

    nws2002
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Like @lottielot I have only one laundry basket. My usual process for clothing is the fluff ‘n fold where everything is done for me and I pick up clean clothes already folded and on hangars, ready to be put away. However, sheets and towels are done at home and my goal is to pull them out of the dryer, into the laundry basket, fold them immediately, and put them away. Doesn’t always work, but I’ve gotten much better

  • #200281

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have a dirty clothing basket (I don’t have space for a laundry basket)- so it does double duty as a laundry basket. I recently when through a ruthless throwing out of linen, clothing, etc so that I have only what I need.

    What I’ve found is that because there is more room, and also more sense in my closet, I’m finding it easier to fold and put away as I go. I’m not having to work out where to put things because the closet is too full.

    Also only having the one basket means that before you can put dirty clothes in the basket – you HAVE to put away the clean ones! LOL

  • #200286

    Netleigh
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    momwalker, how many laundry baskets do you have?
    I have two and need to empty them to move the next loads of washing either outside to the line or across the kitchen to the dryer or upstairs when the thinks are dry. If we have left them full of dry clothes I take them upstairs and put the contents on the bed thus making me or dh put them away before bedtime!

  • #200288

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Laundry was my downfall for years. I grew up the eldest of 9, and never could get caught up. Plus since I sewed most of the family’s clothes, everything was cotton and had to be ironed. Arghhh!

    Now, my youngest is still small enough for wash and dry and fold Garanimals and OshKosh. My older son is at a uniform school so wash dry and hang slacks and polos. My daughter is the clothes horse, but all of her stuff is also wash and wear – she’s into the layering, with a spaghetti strap tank under a tee under a jacket and stretch pants or jeans. My scanty closet is also wash and wear.

    I was really bad about washing, drying and leaving clothes (particularly mine) in baskets. I tried to get the kids to put theirs away, but they did the same thing – left them in baskets – and it was hard for me to crack down when I was guilty too.

    I am fortunate enough to have an actual laundry room with washer and dryer, plus an adjacent little cubby where I have a plain card table set up and shelving all round. I try to spend a little time each day doing laundry, folding and hanging in the cubby room, and then making sure the kids collect their folded and hung clothes. It’s working well!

  • #200289

    rutheverhart
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Ninakk — I love your comments about “mid-station” — that is a really helpful idea. This past year I’ve worked on “closing the loop” — it has been helpful in so many small, and so many large, ways. The mid-station is another way to think about closing the loop — it’s like you “almost” but “not quite” close it — why do we do this to ourselves? The trick is to see what we’re doing. We’re burdening ourselves for later. Thanks for the word. Mid-station.

  • #200290

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Netleigh, the fact that I don’t really know how many of these I have, maybe saying something. I know at one point it was suggested(years ago) that to better streamline the household laundry I should have one for dirty/one for clean for each member of the family. That in itself would put me at 8.
    Taking the clean clothes directly to the bed(which I do keep made up) or the kitchen table-any area that I do try keep tidy, to get me in the habit of just following all the way through instead of just dumping them in the basket was the suggestion.

  • #200291

    herisff
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have 2 baskets, one for clothes and one for towels/dog stuff. However, both baskets get attended to each week. However many loads there are, they get folded immediately and stuff put away. I use my bed as my folding station, so it gets attended to quickly – seeing piles on my bed disturbs me. And now that I have the dogs, if I leave anything on the bed they will nest in it.

    Baskets may or may not be your problem, but for sure you need to fold things as soon as they are dry. To me it’s just part of doing the laundry, and has been for years.

  • #200293

    smallLife
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have one laundry hamper (I didn’t know people even had separate baskets for clean clothes! Learn something new every day.). I wash on cold, so don’t separate white/dark/lights. It gets emptied into the washing machine, used to transport damp clothes to drying rack, and then dry clean clothes to the bed for folding. Can’t dawdle because then there’s nowhere for dirty clothes to go.

    Never having had a clean clothes basket, I think it’s more likely that they are a hindrance – being another place clothes can pile up but still seem “neat”.

  • #200306

    luxcat
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I keep a plastic laundry basket on top of the washer/dryer which holds dirty and/or wet towels and rags until I have enough for a load. I keep a cloth hamper in my closet for dirty clothing along with a small basket for handwash items. Once I have enough to run a full load (usually about once a week) I wash and dry it and then toss it all on the bed for folding. If I put it back in the basket I fear I would never get to it either!

    Maybe you can have just two baskets, one for dirty and one for clean, and wash/fold as the baskets fill up, so that you have a sort of maximum limit for how many clean clothes can pile up?

  • #200308

    Astreja
    Participant

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    As I live in a 3-storey house and usually collect laundry on the second floor, where most of the bedrooms are, some sort of basket is essential.

    I have 1 flexible basket (handles fold together so I can carry it single-handed up or down the stairs), and it usually lives in the bathroom. Cats like to snooze in the basket because it’s right next to the bathroom heat vent, so it does double duty.

    Down in the basement I have a plastic laundry hamper that I use for overflow if I’ve brought down more clothes than will fit in the current load.

  • #200315

    lottielot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I think the key here is to consider a laundry basket as a mode of transportation, rather than a form of storage! I do sometimes leave dry laundry in the basket if I’m short on time to close that loop (love that idea) but then the cat sits on it as Astreja says, and I don’t like clean clothes covered in cat hair even before they reach the drawers. Besides, if the dry washing is still in the basket, I have to lug my wet washing about in my arms and end up dropping stray socks everywhere. I would cull all but 2 baskets if possible (one clean, one dirty) and change your attitude towards the baskets. Picture them with little wheels or something, responsible for whizzing your washing around the house πŸ™‚

  • #200318

    Astreja
    Participant

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    @lottielot: Fortunately, the cats only nap on the dirty laundry. As it comes out of the dryer it gets toted up to the dining room where I have lots of table space to sort and fold, and then upstairs to be put away. The basket itself usually gets a good shake-out as soon as I empty it in the basement so that cat byproducts don’t follow the clean laundry back upstairs.

  • #200322

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Thanks everybody, I am so glad I started this thread this morning. I am taking action on this TODAY. My plan is to get everything put up, stack all of them together and set them out in the storage room. Then see if the straight from dryer to table or bed suggestion will work for me too. I think just changing the way I think about their purpose is going to help. I have always considered the laundry basket as a “must have” item if you have laundry. The thought of viewing them different has truly been an eye opener.

  • #200323

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I like my laundry baskets for transport, exactly. To get clothes from the top floor to the bottom where the laundry room is at, and to scoop the clothes out of the dryer without dropping them on the floor and then simply turn around and set them on the table in the folding room behind me. Then I can fold and hang right from the basket and they don’t slide off the small table onto the floor.

    Each of my children has either a small basket or a little pop up hamper in their room for dirties, and is responsible for dumping them in the laundry room for washing.

  • #200324

    pkilmain
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have a laundry shoot so the dirty clothes get delivered directly to a laundry basket at the bottom in the laundry room! πŸ™‚ It really just keeps them from spilling all over the floor, and basically never moves. I have one basket that carries wet clothing to clothesline and/or drying rack. When things are dry, it carries them upstairs where they get dumped on the bed for folding, putting away. I try to fold sheets and towels as they come off the line or out of the dryer. They take up too much room in the basket, and once folded can go directly to their home, bypassing the folding station (to keep with Ninakk’s metaphor, they are on the express line!)

  • #200325

    bandicoot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    we have one laundry basket to collect stuff awaiting washing.
    clean laundry comes in off the line or from the dryer and is folded and put away, simply because there is no holding area any more.
    i used to have a huge clean laundry basket, but it was a pit of despair.
    things would go in there and not resurface for months.
    it was a habit i worked hard to break.
    now i view the gathering-in of clean laundry as simply the first step of the job…..it isn’t over until the loop is closed.

    i find it very helpful to hang shirts and tops on hangers to dry on the line.
    then there is no more handling…i simply walk inside with the hangered clothes and put them away.

  • #200334

    PJ
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Because my (3 compartment) hamper is too big to carry up and down the stairs, I do have a laundry basket. Although I often end up just carrying the clothes, both clean and dirty, up and down the stairs in my arms.

    I also struggle with getting my clean clothes put away. I have a chair in my bedroom, and all too often, it ends up piling up there. I’ve often used the technique of “throw a load in the washer before bed” and “hang a load up to dry before leaving for work.” But I think that dragging the process out like that interferes with the thought process that herisff identified, where putting the laundry away is “just part of doing the laundry.” At the very least, I’ve been trying to take the time, when putting in a load of laundry, to take the now-been-dry-for-days last load up and put it away!

    To more specifically address the question of laundry baskets, I’ll share with you a story about my sister, who lives in the basement apartment of the house where I live upstairs. My sister is not very organized about housework (me neither – both of us freely admit it) and particularly slow to take out her garbage and recycling. Just before Christmas, I had booked a furnace servie call, so cleaned up the laundry room in preparation for him coming. My sister had supplemented her recycling bin with 3 more laundry baskets and they were all overflowing with recycling. IMHO, once you start giving yourself permission to have more than the one bin, it’s a slippery slope.

    But as I said, I’m one to talk. Maybe I should get rid of the chair from my bedroom …

  • #200335

    Zora
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have one laundry hamper, a large one on wheels. The condo’s laundry room is on my level, so I can wheel the hamper down the hall to the laundry. The laundry goes to the laundry room in the hamper, comes back dry and clean in the hamper. It is them IMMEDIATELY dumped on my bed and folded. Otherwise I have no place to put dirty clothing.

    I admit to sometimes running off to do another chore and forgetting about the clean laundry. Which is promptly colonized by cats, who love the warm, snuggly fabric. That’s a reason to fold and store immediately. Plus, I can’t go to bed unless the laundry is done, nor can I have the satisfaction of checking LAUNDRY off the to-do list.

  • #200347

    Rosa
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Oh man, I’d be in trouble if I could only have one recycling bin. Our pickup is only every other week and every month we have a party that fills one bin completely with beer & cider bottles, even before paper & other everyday recyclables.

    I have 3 laundry containers – one in each bedroom, and one in the kitchen for rags/napkins/wet towels from gym bags. Each one gets full of dirty laundry, then refilled with clean (either from the dryer or the laundry line), so I have to put all the clean laundry away or the boys in this house just drop their dirty laundry on the floor near where the basket should be.

  • #200349

    Rosa
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    And i’m realizing from reading comments – I think I’m not alone in not sorting by color, here. Right? It looks like the “everything in this hamper gets washed together” method is pretty common. That has saved me the most laundry hassle, washing everything on cold & not separating colors (really dirty things do go in the kitchen laundry, though).

  • #200353

    Northshore
    Participant

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have multiple baskets but I use them to carry laundry and to sort the dirty clothes. Once it’s clean, clothes gets folded and put away–or at least placed on everyone’s dresser. I grew up with baskets of clothes waiting to be folded. One day I was at my aunt’s house. The dryer stopped. She took each item out, folded it right on top of the dryer. I was amazed. I had never thought of doing that.

  • #200354

    ninakk
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    forgot to say that we do have two small baskets built into the bathroom cupboards, one for whites and the other for colours. they come out only when i sort the dirty laundry but otherwise they are tucked away. it was very useful to admit to my shortcomings because the laundry which i washed yesterday was neatly folded and put away in one wave today once it had dried. yay! this is how habits are created, challenged and changed; insight and honesty.

  • #200355

    Sky
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have a laundry hamper in our bedroom. I take whatever is in it to the laundry room each morning and sort darks and lights into 2 bins by the washer. After a load is washed, dryed and folder, I put it away. There is only DH and me so it isn’t a lot.
    I don’t use a laundry basket at all anymore.

  • #200367

    pkilmain
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Rosa – I sort more often by fabric weight, i.e. jeans and DH’s heavy shirts in a load separate from socks and undies. πŸ™‚ Sheets and towels go together. They’re so well-used there’s no possibility of color transfer.

  • #200376

    kstanfor
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    This discussion has been very interesting and has made me look at my use of mid-stations in situations outside of the laundry.

    I am surprised by the number of people referring to using driers. I can understand their use in apartments and in rainy or snowy weather. It is not a judgement but rather an observation. Are driers routinely used in the US? Or are the references because it is winter? Like Bandicoot, I live in Australia. I have a clothes drier but I usually dry items on the line using clothes hangers whenever possible to reduce the need to iron. I am very lazy!

  • #200377

    luxcat
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Dryers are much more commonly used here in the USA (in all areas, warm and cold) than in Europe in my experience- partially perhaps because the houses seem to be larger and often have a laundry room or attached garage in which there is space for one. Having never been to Australia I don’t know how the buildings are done traditionally there…

    In my case we use one because we live in an apartment building where there is no outdoor drying space (or indoor either for that matter- all we have is a little four foot line above the washing machine in a closet with little air circulation) and you are not allowed in many buildings or communities to use the out-of-window racks and lines one sees in use in urban areas of Europe.

    If you take things promptly out of the dryer you actually have to iron less than if you hangar or rack-dry things and they can get a crease if not lying perfectly flat. I despise ironing and will do anything to avoid it! There seems to also be a misconception (in Ireland at least, where I’m from) that using a dryer ruins your clothing. In truth it’s over-drying or drying at a high temperature that does that, and the over use of fabric softener. If you go about it the right way using an electric dryer doesn’t shorten the life span of clothes that I’ve noticed.

  • #200378

    PJ
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    LOL, Rosa! Our pick up for recyclables is only every 2nd week too, but we have a massive outdoor recycling bin on wheels that my sister can empty her smaller bin into. There are only 3 of us in the house, and my sister is quite a shy person – no monthly parties here! (BTW, how do I wangle an invite?) Besides, we pay a deposit on alcoholic drink bottles, so those would be returned straight to the store to get our money back. No, our recycling bin is primarily full of cat food tins (from me) and pop bottles (my sister and niece). I don’t really care about her habits, except that her recycling takes over half the laundry room, and she’ll let it pile up for several months, then fill the outside bin all in one go – leaving me no place to empty my small indoor bin.

    I have a 3 compartment hamper (plus my extra laundry basket) because I used to let the hassle of sorting the laundry put me off from actually washing it. Now I sort as I get undressed – dark delicate, dark/coloured regular wash, light delicate, and white/bleach load. I can speak for Canada, I think, when I say that regular use of dryers is common – my friends seem to think it’s odd that I hang so many things to dry (most of my dark delicate and light delicate loads). @kstanfor, it’s interesting that you say you hang stuff to reduce ironing – I think of the dryer as making it less likely that I’d need to iron! As long as I take them out promptly and get them folded or hung up right away, that is.

  • #200379

    Ella
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I love folding my laundry right out of the dryer when it’s still warm and fragrant (yay Method lavender dryer cloths). Plus, it’s a chance to play an entertaining game of Sock! with my kitty. When she sees me coming with the laundry basket, she jumps up on the bed and flops down belly up, waiting. Every load always has plenty of socks. As I get to each sock in the pile, I call out “Sock!” and pelt her with it (gently of course) until she’s completely buried in warm socks, purring like mad. Then she rolls around in them, happy as a lamb in clover.

  • #200387

    Rosa
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    kstanfor, it’s way more common to use a clothesdryer in North America. I hang things when it’s warm enough (about 7 months of the year, here in Minnesota – it’s below freezing for about 5 months most years, though this year has been unusually warm and I’ve dried a few loads outdoors) but for two of those months, it’s so damp it takes regular t-shirts 2-3 days to get dry and I end up drying a load a week or so. But we’re considered extreme environmentalists – I’ve had more than one neighbor assume I was line-drying because of poverty and offer me the use of her dryer. I’m pretty sure it’s because electricity is so cheap here, at least compared to the UK – don’t know about Australia.

    PJ – our recycling bins are the size of two paper shopping bags, so I fill at least 2 every 2 weeks – that’s a bag of paper, a bag of glass, a bag of plastics, and a bag of aluminum. But the parties are remarkably tame – it’s all babies and board games these days, plus a few bottles of beer per person.

    I WISH we had a beverage return law here – I grew up one state over, where there was a 5 cent deposit, and there were never bottles on the ground because homeless people picked them up. Instead, I pick up a few things about every time I leave the house – the week of Christmas I picked up 3 giant vodka bottles from the ground in our neighborhood – one in the grocery store parking lot, one by the train station, and one by a bus stop near our house. That was almost a bag right there. And since only aluminum is worth money, and it takes a ton to make a trip to the recycling place worth it, the homeless people wait til we sort it and then come steal it from the bins on pickup morning.

  • #200389

    mdfloyd
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    What an interesting thread!

    @luxcat: You just solved a problem I have — what to do with the dirty cloths when I don’t have enough for a load in the washer. Stick ’em in a plastic bag next to the washer. Duh! I’ve been using HandiWipes or paper towels because I couldn’t see washing one or two small towels/rags at a time.

    I live in a small house, with the washer/dryer next to my bedroom. I have two baskets; one for dirty clothes that I keep in my main closet, and one I use to prop the bedroom door open. That’s the one I use to store things I’m planning to take to Goodwill. I like it when it’s empty; it means more stuff I don’t need is outta the house. Clean clothes coming out of the dryer get folded and hung up immediately; there’s no room for racks to hang anything by the washer/dryer.

  • #200393

    Sky
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I live in South Carolina,USA and we only have about 3 months of cold weather each year but I use my dryer most of the time. I hang some of my clothes in my laundry room because of the fabric but rarely hang anything outside. Our electric bill is low and there are only two of us.

    I do love sheets hung on the line, they smell wonderful but….we have a lot of trees and birds poop on them! Not cool.

    I fold/hang everything right out of the dryer as soon as it cuts off and I don’t need to iron anything.

  • #200394

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I’ve lived only in the south (Texas and Georgia) and dryers are common as well. I can remember hanging out clothes when I was a child, but only because we were too poor for a dryer. Hanging clothes for 11 people would have been a horrendous chore, so I’m glad we had a dryer by the time kid #6 came along. Humid days with a heat index of 115 were pure hell…

    Dryers use a ridiculously small amount of electricity and cause no harm to clothing when used properly. Works for me. I’ve known some people who clothesline dry and feel quite superior over it (no-one here, I’m sure!). I don’t care what others do as long as they don’t care what I do πŸ™‚

    The honest truth is, I don’t have time to line dry and iron clothing for a family of five. I learned a long time ago that time is money, and have often made decisions on how I do things based on the tradeoff – do I really want to spend two hours a day washing dishes by hand, and another two hanging laundry? Or do I want to spend two hours making an extra hundred dollars and two with my kids?

  • #200401

    smallLife
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I hang up clothes to dry and use a folding rack for delicates and small things – the only things that go in the dryer are towels, socks, underwear, and T shirts. I don’t have enough room to line dry everything or I would. I’ve had too many clothes ruined by the dryer (shrunk, stretched because it was tied around something, lost fibers, etc.) to risk it to anything I need to be presentable.

  • #200418

    Irulan
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have a popup hamper in the bedroom. It holds dirty clothes and hauls them to/from the washer and dryer in the bathroom. A second popup hamper lives behind the dresser for the rare times that linens and towels grow to overwhelming proportions.

    I separate into towels/linens, lights/whites (both of which get washed on hot) and darks/jeans (which get washed on cold). I use the dryer for everything except sweaters and jeans, which get laid out on the dining table overnight.

    Growing up, we had a lot of problems with clean, folded laundry sitting in the basket by the washer for ages or not getting put away at all. We probably had 6-8 laundry baskets, too. All of it was because there wasn’t enough space in the dressers or closets. My parents still have this issue because they don’t purge enough old clothes and linens.

  • #200424

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I use my dryer mostly for 3 reasons – 1. I can’t bend down easily because of arthritis in the spine – so bending and standing up repetitively to put things on the line wll result in me being incapacitated for a few hours afterwards.
    2. It’s a communal line, and I’m nervous about leaving things out there on it.
    3. I’m a slacker and it’s easier to put them in the dryer πŸ˜€

  • #201481

    Joless
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have two hampers for dirty washing (one in bathroom, one in bedroom) and one washing basket. I collect a load of whatever colour it is today from the hampers into the basket, stick it in the machine and leave the basket by it to remind me. When it’s done, I use the basket to transport it to the airer (or occasionally the drier) or line, and the basket stays somewhere around the drying washing. Then it all gets folded into the basket when it’s dry and goes upstairs and put away immediately. Then the basket goes back to wait for the next time I do washing.

    I don’t really understand how clean washing doesn’t just get put away, isn’t it in the way otherwise? Plus I couldn’t use the basket if it was full. But, I only have two adults and a dog’s washing so maybe I am living in la-la land about how much kids create πŸ™‚

  • #201489

    lottielot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    JoLess: when kids are tiny you have noooo idea how much washing something so small can possibly create!! Now my kids are bigger they require less washing but their clothes are getting bigger…And then if you have kids that’s also more bed linen, more towels, more sports gear etc etc. I do a minimum of a load a day, and I’m really not particular about my kids’ clothes as long as they’re not toooo covered in mud or jam, one load a day just keeps my laundry system ticking over but I have been completely buried in laundry when the kids were smaller, it only takes a kid with a vomiting virus or a family holiday to end up with a huge mountain of washing!

  • #201491

    Rosa
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    That’s the thing, Joless, places I’ve been in the UK were set up so it was just as easy to line dry. My partner did a semester of college in Scotland, and the communal laundry room had ceiling drying racks. Where I went to college in the US, there was plenty of space but no racks/lines except outside the married family housing – and those were leftover from when the housing was built in the ’40s.
    The family I nannied for in London had a little airing closet (? i think that’s what it’s called) right next to the washer. I’ve had to install laundry lines every place I’ve ever lived here.

  • #201980

    Joless
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have only ever lived in houses (i.e. no apartment buildings) and I think most houses over here have an airing cupboard, or people (like me at the moment) just stick up a portable airer somewhere in the house. Line drying in the summer is definitely the standard. I use the tumble dryer maybe once or twice a month.

    @lottielot – I shall enjoy being grateful I don’t have that lot to deal with then πŸ™‚ I do maybe one load a day, but if I forget it never piles up to more than a couple of loads and that’s including bedding/towels and sports kit and dog stuff.

  • #201983

    lottielot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Lol, I put out a load outside yesterday as it was so sunny, forgot about it till just now and just brought it in, stiff as boards! Quite dry though, I’ll finish it off on an airer. I have another load to hang out but really, it is much too cold out there πŸ™‚

  • #201987

    pkilmain
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    LOL, Lottie. I remember my mother would hang laundry out in freezing weather and bring in these still thing and rehang them in our basement. But they were really pretty dry and once thawed, dried very quickly. We didn’t have a clothes dryer until I was a teenager.

  • #201995

    lottielot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Freeze-dried clothes πŸ™‚ At least they smell good, sort of autumnal for some reason πŸ™‚ It’s back to milder weather and indoor drying here by Wednesday, these are about the first sharp frosts of winter so far. I saw some daffodils out just after Christmas, the poor plants are confused!

  • #202000

    pkilmain
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    While I’m nice and warm here in Hawaii 80+F (and drying my laundry outdoors to keep this on topic LOL), at home in Alaska the temperatures are subzero F, and not just a little, more like -15 to -20. Brrr. I still have 9 more days here.

  • #202028

    loripax
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    We’re lucky to have the laundry room right off the bedroom, so there’s no traipsing up and down stairs or any of that. We have three baskets: one for darks, one for towels and lights, and one for rags and other heavy-duty stuff. Oh, and a little basket in the kitchen to temporarily collect kitchen towels, so I guess that’s four, really.

    When a basket gets full, we start a load. When I need a break from what I’m doing (I work at home), I’ll start a load or transfer it to the dryer or plop it on the bed and fold it. I’ve been responsible for the laundry since something like age 8, so it’s no big deal for me to do it, just as natural as brushing my teeth.

    I don’t use baskets for clean laundry anymore since it’s easy to gather it up in an armload and walk it across the room to the bed to fold, but back in the day when I did, I had to put the laundry away to have the basket to collect dirty clothes again.

    And I *hated* line drying when I had to do it the first couple of years I lived in Hawaii and our house had a washer but no dryer. Everything would come out all wrinkled and stretched and sometimes dirty if the wind was blowing the right way and kicking up the dirt, and my clothes would have all these weird marks from where the clothespins were, or lines where I hung them folded over the line. I’d go without a dishwasher before I’d go without a dryer, and I hate doing dishes almost as much as I hate ironing (that with the fire of a thousand suns).

  • #202328

    whit
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have two laundry baskets, definitely a helpful tool! One is your typical rectangular plastic basket, fits into the corner of the closet and holds dirty clothes and takes them down to the kitchen where my laundry machines are. The other is a weird gray storage cube thing with a lid that zips shut. It sits on top of the stacked machines and holds clean laundry, though I tend to put it away quickly as there are only two of us. It also carries other stuff down to the basement or upstairs, or temporarily hides stuff when people visit. I do try to keep it empty, though, and it’s falling apart so I might need to replace it soon. I like to line-dry in the summer, and recently got a umbrella-style line dryer as a present, to replace the ghetto-cable strung across the yard and deck. But I also recently got a new washer and dryer to replace the italian washer/dryer combo that didn’t dry anymore. So I will have to have willpower to not run the dryer when it gets warmer as it’s so easy now. So far I’m actually pretty good about keeping up with laundry but if we add children to the equation I’m sure it won’t be so easy. My husband leaves his clothes all over, both clean and dirty, but I refuse to take responsibility for that!

  • #202394

    bandicoot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    dryers are pretty common in australia now, but electricity is wildly expensive.
    and dryers do suck power…anything with a heating element does.
    we line dry by default, but this is the wet tropics and there are periods where it is raining night and day and things will grow mould long before they’ll dry : this is when i adore having a dryer and the hell with the expense.

    o and is it a guy thing?
    my husband happily throws dirty clothes on top of clean clothes and cannot understand why my flesh creeps at the very idea of it.

  • #202396

    liag
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Bandicoot–Do you mind using same basket for dirty and then for clean clothes?

  • #202417

    chacha1
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    We live in an apartment with shared machines in the basement. There is no possibility of line-drying. DH does our laundry.

    He has a hamper in the home office (the apartment’s “master” bedroom, with en-suite bath; it’s his man cave). My bathroom has a built-in hamper in the vanity.

    He collects everything once a week and takes it down. We don’t sort by color, everything is washed in cold with unscented biodegradable detergent. We stay away from white clothes. πŸ™‚ Even our sheets are paisley!

    We hang dry a lot of stuff inside the apartment, having found that our plentiful door openings, with casing, will support several hangers apiece without interfering with traffic (we are not very wide).

    As soon as a load comes up from the laundry, DH sorts and either hangs it or folds it. He uses a collapsible wheeled cart to move things to and fro. This is his primary contribution to the housekeeping so I do not offer opinions on his methods. πŸ™‚

  • #202428

    lottielot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Very wise, chacha1! On the occasions when dh offers opinions on my laundry skills his clothes get mysteriously ripped or left unwashed for several weeks πŸ™‚

  • #202449

    bandicoot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    liag, if it was a cloth basket or closed in any way, it wouldn’t do for me.
    my basket is a big old wicker thing.
    i don’t use the basket for clean laundry, though.
    i fold right off the line or out of the dryer onto a handy bbq table, then carry the folded stacks in by hand.
    this is a habit i have learned in the last couple of years and i much prefer it.
    piles of unfolded clean laundry lying about for any time seem to attract dust and cat hair at a faster rate than anything else.

  • #202479

    snosie
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Wow, you don’t realise how many different ways people do things!

    I have two ‘dirty’ hampers – white and black, for lights and darks (sometimes this escapes people!?) They live in the bathroom/laundry. If I disrobe in my bedroom, then I must cart the items to the laundry hampers next trip there. Hampers = dirty.

    I then wash as one is full. I have a washing basket (cane/wicker?) that I take the wet clothing to the drying rack or clothes line, to hang. The hamper stays ‘out of place’ by either until it’s dry. Then I take off an item, fold and place in the basket. (when I’m doing laundry for my family, sometimes I OCD it to getting all of one person’s at a time, so then it’s easier to deliver!). When the laundry is all off, it gets taken to it’s home. Basket = clean.

    For me, except if it’s SUDDENLY started raining, there’s no way I’ll take ‘in’ the washing without folding as I go. And the basket needs to go ‘home’ (to the laundry/bathroom ledge), so I just cart stuff to it’s home, shelve it, hang it for ironing etc, and that’s it, done!

    I think the key is to make it not an option not to put things away. And as I’ve read on here before, maybe it’s not the hampers/baskets, it’s that you dread finding space in the closet?

    And Lori, I live without a dryer (a lot by choice). It’s mainly a power consumption/guilt thing!

  • #202490

    Anonymous

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have two organizing fetishes: bagging my own groceries and hanging out laundry. Neither is especially productive, I just get great satisfaction out of doing those two tasks. Unpacking the bags or putting the clothes away, not even close. In Arizona the clothes dry quite fast on the line but I do laundry after work and don’t hang them out at night, so into the dryer it is.

    I keep three laundry baskets, which fit neatly side by side in the closet under DH’s shirt hangers. Whites, darks, colors. They are white plastic, tall, and in big marker letters I have them labeled. I found a neat clothes rack that folds into itself when I am not using it.
    http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&sugexp=lttmoc&cp=22&gs_id=2k&xhr=t&q=folding+laundry+hanger&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&biw=1600&bih=745&wrapid=tljp1327167609028037&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=6211294588852673371&sa=X&ei=ffgaT_PgL8KYiAK-yMSZCA&sqi=2&ved=0CIMBEPMCMAI# When the laundry comes out of the dryer, I try to hang it as I retrieve it from the dryer.

    DH has no desire to have folded underclothes, so it is super easy to sort and place the shorts, white T-shirts and socks and toss them in a drawer. Hard for me to believe but he really does not care about that. He’s basically happy that a laundry fairy comes and makes the clothes somehow reappear in a drawer when he needs them.

  • #202541

    pkilmain
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Another Deb – my DH is the same. He likes his socks matched, everything else just goes in a drawer, though to be fair, they go in three small drawers: t-shirts, shorts and hankies, socks.

  • #202782

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Thanks for all the input. I have loved reading all the different ways everyone does their laundry. Since I started this thread, definitely have been abusing the use of my laundry baskets. I am still clearing out misc baskets around my house. Until I read through this thread I have NEVER heard of putting clean clothes on the bed(which is always made), but that is what I have been doing and it has made all the difference in the world. The whole family has enjoyed the fact that there is clean socks in the drawer—I had 2 large baskets with just socks that I had not matched up. I am also trying to stay more focused on the laundry. Just adding it to too many multitasking steps and not considering ONE whole project seemed to make it low on my mental list of “things to get done” so I was stopping short of actually putting things away. The statement of “well, atleast they are all clean” is something now I hopefully get away from.

    I hope someone else that may have a problem of getting that final step of putting away the laundry well get something out of this thread too. Thanks again everyone…..off to empty out another laundry basket.

  • #202797

    lucy1965
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Yay, this thread’s still going!

    To get to the laundry room, one goes down a narrow, twisty set of stairs; a laundry basket doesn’t fit unless it’s held at an odd angle (which makes descent even more dangerous), so I gave up and started hauling the clothing in an Ikea “bag for life”.

    There is a folding cloth hamper in our bedroom; it’s emptied when full and the contents sorted downstairs into a three-compartment cloth hamper (delicates, shirts and trousers, sheets and body towels). Kitchen/cleaning cloths are dried on a small wooden towel rod above the sink, then taken downstairs and washed separately.

    Delicates are dried on a big wooden rack I bought years ago at Ikea; I hang laundry outdoors whenever possible (two retractable lines that cross the back patio), but during the snowy months everything else goes into the dryer.

    Everything comes back upstairs the same way, is folded on the dining room table and put away immediately.

  • #202807

    poodle
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I LOVE my laundry baskets and holder. My utility room is outside (my house is older), so the only load that I can carry in one trip to the washer (and after being dried back into the house) is the sheets. My spare bedroom is a mish-mash of stuff (I randomly go through it and clean out and re-organize – it’s on my list to do in the next few weeks). I have a 3-in-one laundry holder for colors, whites and towels. The laundry baskets stack inside themselves next to it. When a section gets full, I fill a basket for washing. Usually they all get full at the same time. The only thing: I have a habit of leaving folded clothes/towels in the baskets and pushing them to the side and living out of those until the laundry holder is full again. I don’t mind washing/drying/folding. But there’s something about putting away that bores me. But, I’m getting better.

  • #202829

    Jennifer
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have been awful at putting laundry away also. I will wash and dry all day long with no complaint, but putting it all away? Ick. However, this is a bad habit I am working on! Cleaning and organizing the closet, as well as downsizing the wardrobe helped a lot.

    My laundry is off the kitchen, all on one floor so no stairs to the washer for the first time ever in my life, and I love it. I use the dryer a ton, living in soggy Oregon. Summer is dry, but dusty, so hanging outside doesn’t work well then either.

  • #202859

    lottielot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Lol, I love laundry chat! After all, I spend an hour or so a day on it…
    Momwalker: can you get your kids to put their own laundry away? My boys have tiny laundry baskets next to their doors and I chuck their stuff in there (literally!) and they have to put it away. Makes a world of difference πŸ™‚ Now if I could only get ds1 to ever actually pick his dirty clothes off the floor and put them somewhere where they may actually get washed.

  • #202933

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    lottielot My kids are getting better but considering that they are in their early 20’s—–(rolling eyes, with a sigh of embarrassment) Teach your children young everyone. They are doing their own laundry now that the laundry room has been de-cluttered and organized to where they can actually get to and do it themselves. For years I just done all the laundry myself-it was just easier at the time. But they are now getting a crash course. Now is better than never I guess.

  • #202937

    loripax
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    What @momwalker said. When my mom went back to work when I was about age 8, I became responsible for doing the family’s laundry. I was responsible for folding my own clothes and putting them away long before that. I think the reason that laundry is such a complete no-brainer non-chore for me now is that I’ve always done it. It’s no more out of the ordinary and taxing than getting up to get a snack when I’m hungry. Even in the days when I didn’t have laundry on premises, going to the laundromat seemed more like having an hour and a half to myself to read my book than having to go do that dreadful chore.

    Then again, I’m weird.

  • #202957

    chacha1
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    We are all weird, in our own, special ways. πŸ™‚

    Laundromat: to me, the 7th circle of hell.

  • #202977

    irishbell
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I’ve always had lots of laundry baskets, I couldn’t function without them!
    I don’t always fold directly out of the dryer, (unless permanent press) or take the clean unfolded laundry and put it on my bed. I usually am doing laundry in between something else, so folding may have to wait a few hours.
    But always that same day. And then put away/in the kids rooms for them to put away.

  • #202985

    MTNgirl
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have been reading this thread since it started. I have been living in a small condo since mid-November. I have all but one of my laundry baskets in storage and I feel crippled! They are so handy, I will be happy to have them back when we move into our new house.

  • #202996

    Rosa
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Momwalker, I’m so glad that’s been better for you!

    My mom always used the laundry as a control over what we could wear – if she didn’t approve of something, she didn’t wash it. So we did our own laundry pretty early (middle school?).

    My little boy is still not strong enough to open drawers on most of our bureaus, so we got him a little sliding-plastic-bin bureau from Ikea – I fold stuff but he seems to just stuff it in there any which way, but it’s just jeans, t-shirts, socks, underwear, and “other” (long johns, pajamas, hoodies). So it doesn’t really matter. We’ll see if he ever has a fashion phase, his dad is still dressing like it’s 1994 (jeans, t-shirt, flannel.)

  • #203001

    snosie
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Lori, I hear you – you’re not weird!

  • #203017

    djk
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I enjoy doing laundry, at least I did until our washer bit the dust and now we are hauling everything to the laundromat. That’s taken a whack of pleasure out of the routine!

    Fortunately our new one will be delivered in a couple of weeks and believe me, I will love not going to the laundromat.

    We’ve a hamper in the bathroom where the washer is so we don’t need baskets to transport laundry. The 2 that came with the place are stacked and hold all of our cleaning supplies, as there is nowhere else to keep them. They live in the shower stall. First person to shower hauls out the baskets and places them on the bathroom floor, last person plops the basket back in the shower and closes the curtain. I use one to empty the wet wash into before hanging it on the drying rack which lives in the bathroom.

    ETA
    as for putting things away when they’re dry, I hang everything like with like according to where the go in the closet. So all of DH’s underwear is hung in one section, mine in another, DH’s white t-shirts hang together, coloured together, socks are matched directly when wet and all go on my Ikea “Socktopus”. So whenever I go into the bathroom I bring out one category of dry things and put them in their home. Of course I am constantly in and out of the bathroom so things get routinely put away by category.
    Jeans, dress shirts/blouses, towels and bedding get hung up on hangers to dry around the flat and over every available door and
    curtain rod, so the impetus is strong to get those put away asap. These hours are when the doorbell is certain to ring:(

  • #203141

    snosie
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    momwalker, I just read this article (and it made me proud to be aussie!): http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/australia-164421

    I suppose it started with the clothes line, so that’s why I thought of you, but it’s interesting in many ways, especially as we all come from so many different places!!

  • #207889

    Ella
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Today after posting on the March goals thread about my laundry piles in the hallway, I re-read this thread for ideas. Putting away clean laundry has never been my problem, but having a dedicated space for dirty laundry in this tiny studio is another story. When I moved here, my old wicker basket was damaged beyond repair. Even though ‘new hamper’ has been on my wish-list ever since, I’ve been making do by filling up paper grocery bags and using them to tote the laundry to the basement washer and dryer. Unfortunately, the bags are not rip-proof and sometimes my clean laundry has tumbled out on the floor during the trek back upstairs. πŸ™

    When I cleaned out my closet in January, I vowed: no more bags of dirty laundry stuffed inside the closet. The stupid solution has been to put the bags in the hallway where (I hoped) that tripping over them would inspire me to do the laundry more often and keep the hall clear. But clutter begets clutter. Instead, the hallway has become the mid-station where all manner of messy stuff accumulates.

    Today I bought a good-sized rectangular wicker hamper with hinged lid, handles, and a removable white cotton liner. The hamper exactly fits inside my closet under the hanging blouses. It’s light enough to carry even when full of laundry. I plan to toss dirty clothes in the hamper without the liner, then put in the liner for transporting the clean dry clothes upstairs. I hope this works!

  • #207899

    Ella
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I’m on the 5th load of laundry now. The new basket/hamper is working splendidly to tote the loads to and fro. πŸ™‚

  • #207900

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Well done, Ella! Sounds like the ideal solution.

  • #207912

    lottielot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Sounds like a good system! Now, can anyone tell me how to stop dh from chucking all his dirty washing on the floor of the upstairs bathroom? I provided a laundry bag which hangs on a hook on the door, but apparently that is too much effort to use πŸ™ I only go up there about once a week tops, give it a quick clean and end up lugging a mountain of laundry down, either having to put it all in the bag just for transportation or carrying it and dropping socks everywhere! There’s no room for a basket.

  • #207921

    bandicoot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    lottielot, i believe i would just leave it there for ever.
    i wouldn’t tolerate that at all.

  • #207931

    Ella
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    lottielot: I agree with bandicoot. You’re reinforcing and rewarding his bad behavior. Just leave it lying there. Eventually he’ll figure it out. It’s like training a dog!

  • #207932

    ninakk
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Another vote for bandicoot’s opinion. I think he is very arrogant and should get treated with ignorance. It should be a given to respectfully make it as easy as possible for the person, who supplies him with clean clothing, to do her/his task. He is not a child and should be able to put his laundry away like any other grownup. I wouldn’t make a scene by any means or be aggressive, but simply matter of fact when he notices that they don’t move from the floor any longer.

  • #207934

    poodle
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Mama used that method to teach me to pick up my dirty clothes from my bedroom floor. I was about 7 or 8, I guess. She had been on me about getting in the habit of putting my clothes in the hamper. One Sunday, I wanted to wear a particular dress to church. I couldn’t find it in my closet, and it wasn’t where the clean laundry was kept until we each put our own piles away. When I asked her where it was, she said to check my floor because that’s where everything else was. I found it wadded and wrinkled under some toys that I had played with. I asked mama if there was time to wash it (I didn’t have a real concept of how long a wash and dry cycle was), she said ‘no’ and I got upset. She told me that if I had put it in the hamper to begin with, she would have washed it. That’s all it took. After church that day, I spent the afternoon picking up my room and getting my dirty clothes put in the hamper. And, I found things that I thought I’d lost, buried under the piles.

  • #207938

    lottielot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Hmm, well I did do that inadvertently recently. Dh asked where ‘all his pants and socks had got to’. To which I replied that they were probably in a massive pile on his bathroom floor…He didn’t get the message though. And if I leave it too long all I get is a ginormous mountain of washing to process all at once, which interferes with my usual good laundry habits. Maybe I need to leave an obvious trail of dirty socks where they get dropped en route down the 2 flights of stairs and through the kitchen and dining room πŸ™‚

  • #207945

    ninakk
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    dear lottielot, if he can’t do what you need him to do – help with a simple small task like put his laundry in a bag a metre’s distance from where he now throws them – maybe it is time for him to do his own laundry? i know all couples have their own agreements, but really, his behaviour is ridiculous and if he can’t take a hint then say it directly. “I won’t wash your stuff unless it is where I need it to be”

  • #207946

    djk
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    DH knows that if it isn’t in the hamper when I feel like washing, it doesn’t get washed. And if he needs it by a certain date, he washes it himself or takes his chances.
    I also had to teach this to my first H. I just enquired politely if his own arms and legs were broken, and if not, I expected him not to create work.

  • #207948

    djk
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Btw I simply don’t feel guilty at all about stating this clearly. I informed both H 1 and, later DH that I am not a slave and as far as I knew they were big boys and were quite able to handle big boy jobs, like taking care of their own issues. I’m a big softy in most areas but I do hate feeling taken for granted and I dig my heels in. It’s effective.

  • #207950

    pkilmain
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Whew, I’m glad I dodged this bullet. πŸ™‚ My DH is very good about putting his clothes in the laundry, and often does his own, and sometimes mine. All I’ve had to ask him to do was line dry his gym clothes so they didn’t sit wet in the laundry basket until wash time. (We have a laundry chute in the bathroom on the main floor which goes to a basket in the basement laundry room)

  • #207956

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    My ex-husband would do his own laundry but leave the clean clothes piled on the bedroom dresser and just take from the pile. It drove me bananas.

    In my present situation, living with my kids ages 17 and 21, I have resorted to having a 3-bin laundry sorter: one canvas bin per person and everyone has two days a week when they can do their laundry. It does make for slightly higher electric and water bills, but the peace that reigns in my home due to lack of sibling fights is wonderful. Before this solution, my special needs daughter liked to do all the laundry and my son just hated her version of folding. So… it’s worth an extra $5-$10 a month for the next year they’re living with me!

    Plus, I’m spending far less in replacing lost socks!!!

  • #207957

    Ella
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Answering the original question of this thread…
    It’s been a revelation how much a good laundry basket/hamper has helped me power through an unprecedented SIX loads of laundry in less than a day. Normally, two loads would wipe me out, what with all the grappling with bags that are too wobbly to set down lest the contents spill out. This hamper is completely stable. Plus, it’s exactly the same height of the mouth of the dryer. Easy-peasy to scoop the clean clothes out and into the hamper without stray socks falling by the wayside.

    And even though it’s lightweight, this hamper is roomy enough to hold the warm clothes loosely so they’re not crushed and wrinkled by the time I get them upstairs to fold. Stuffing clothes in the grocery bags crushed everything and made my ironing even more of a chore. Isn’t it amazing what inconvenience I’ve put myself through for nearly two years just because it became a habit?

  • #207958

    Rosa
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Ella, that’s awesome.

    It is kind of amazing how a simple, good tool can make things a lot better. I lived without kitchen countertops for a little over a year and now we’ve had them about a month, I am STILL happy every morning when I get the toaster out an PUT IT ON THE COUNTER like a regular person. And we’ve had a car with a CD player for about 4 years now but it still makes me unreasonably happy. Maybe the trick is doing without for a while first πŸ™‚

  • #207975

    evelaurel
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I’m surprised that no one here uses my method: I put shirts and trousers on hangers as they come out of the dryer, and hook them onto an over-the-door valet. I hang 3 tote bags over my arm, and drop socks, underwear and dishtowels into the appropriate bag. When I bring my laundry upstairs, each bag’s contents gets dumped into its own drawer. The only items left to fold are towels.

    I safety-pin socks together before putting them in the laundry hamper each night. Perhaps I’m overdoing this organization-thing. πŸ˜‰

  • #208284

    Joless
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    @lottielot – I agree, I won’t wash stuff which isn’t in the laundry basket. Why should I have to try and figure out what needs washing and what doesn’t? Ugh.

  • #208289

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    LOL Eve at the safety pinning the socks!That is VERY organized.

    I taught my children colors and matching with socks. I would always buy their little socks in all different colors and they would sit with me and help match the socks and learn the names of the colors – pink, red, yellow, orange, purple, tan, brown, black, white…even shades like light green, dark green, light blue, dark blue, etc. I also let them fold the rags as it taught motor control.

  • #208452

    badkitti
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I have collapsing crates to cary laundry around. I sort it when its dried so that when I can grab 5 mins its ready to go away very quickly.

    I also have a tub on top of the washing machine for dirty bibs and j-cloths, and two nappy buckets. With the nappies I sem to have to do a load of something a day and this sems to get me on top of the laundry. ish.

  • #208497

    bandicoot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    loooove the safety-pinning of socks idea!
    not neccessary in this particular house ( not much sock wearing in the tropics) but a great idea nonetheless.

    i have beome more and more enamoured with mesh laundry bags in the last year.
    i just pop my clothes into those as i go along and when i have a few bags, i do a load of my laundry.
    if my things are already in bags, dh is happy to do laundry also, without having to work out what needs to be bagged and what doesn’t.

    trying to train dh to fold stuff right off the line, but he is incredibly resistant.
    so, if he takes things off the line, i just make sure i close the loop soonish, before things get wrinkled.

  • #208502

    jmhva
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Bandicoot,
    I really love the mesh laundry bags also. I use one for lingerie hanging inside my three compartment laundry hamper. The other one I keep in my lingerie drawer with all my fancy (not everyday)lingerie. These bags are great to throw in your suitcase also and then when you get home just toss into the washer The best bag is the one from Walmart, mesh with a zipper, and it has a Tide label on it.
    The three compartment laundry hamper is a real help also. I use one section for darks, one for towels, and one for whites.
    Laundry is my favorite thing! Can you tell πŸ™‚

  • #208503

    bandicoot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    lol, yes, your laundry sounds beautifully organised!

    o yes, i like mesh laundry bags for travel also.
    it makes things so easy.
    i travel with just one bag and usually two outfits plus the one i am wearing….i pack one outfit in each laundry bag, plus another laundry bag for underwear/swimsuit/sarong/scarf.
    when i get home, things are already bagged to be laundered, just like you say.

  • #208518

    djk
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Heh. And here I thought I was the clever one with the mesh bag usage.
    For the past 15 years I made packing modules with those plastic laundry bags you get in hotels, with the shoe bags working as underwear & socks modules. Then last year I wanted to replace my mesh lingerie bag and the new package contained 2, one of which was as big as the hotel bags. Et voilΓ , from then on I have used the mesh bags for travel modules. I only ever travel with one roller bag and my purse, and for overnighters just a bigger purse with my toothbrush, paste, deodorant, bar of soap and an extra pair of undies. The modular packing makes travel simple. I don’t separate by outfit but by tops in one, bottoms in another, wee sma’s in another. Then I’ve got a toiletries bag and a small bag with chargers.
    They’re the best things ever.

  • #208520

    pkilmain
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    We have some bags given us by a niece who is a tennis umpire, and travels internationally all the time. They are a lightweight nylon/canvas, with a mesh side. We have several different sizes, but alas none big enough for clothing. I use them for underwear, swimsuit, etc. One does duty in my gym bag to hold small sizes of shampoo, deoderant, etc. I have been using a cloth shoe bag for chargers, but I’m thinking of swapping to the small one of these bags. For my larger clothing items, I use 1 or 2 gallon sized ziplock bags which I can press most of the air out of. Keeps things from getting wrinkled, and hopefully since they’re clear, the TSA’s grubby fingers out of!

    When we travel in two weeks, I am taking a queen-sized quilt which I made for my sister. Since DH usually has a duffel type bag, I think I’m going to put it in that. I can take anything of his that it displaces, and most likely on the return home we can put the duffel in my bag altogether. Hoping that this works. The quilt would cost a small fortune to mail, and the chance of it getting lost is higher with the post office than the airlines. And since we members of their MVP (most valued passengers) we don’t have to pay to check bags.

  • #208526

    bandicoot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    it took me a loooong time to figure out that packing in modules was part of the one-bag travel solution!
    my modules sound exactly like yours, djk.
    simple, obvious, no fuss.
    when it is time to leave, it is so easy and fast to pack.

  • #208557

    irishbell
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I don’t think I understand, you pack clothing items in small mesh bags?
    Why is this easier than just packing all things together.
    I really don’t travel enough to have any sort of system, other than rolling
    my clothes. I’ m all about learning something new and better!
    Re: laundry baskets.
    I recently bought 6 new white ones, (lighter to carry, and not 10 years old!)
    2 stay in the laundry room, right off kitchen. 4 in linen closet. 2 for dirty towels, 2 for dirty clothes.
    I’ve always had and used lots of laundry baskets, makes life much easier for me!

  • #208559

    bandicoot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    for myself, when i travel, i like to empty my bag and hang my stuff up, as soon as i land somewhere.
    mesh bags make that easier.
    en route, if i need to go into my bag for anything (and i always do), mesh bags simplify things…..i know exactly what is in each module, so i don’t disrupt the whole bag to get to one specific item.
    on the way home, i can keep clean and worn clothes easily separated.
    modules seem to keep the whole bag tidier and my clothes are protected from getting caught on things in the bag.

  • #208571

    djk
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I do the same as bandicoot–it helps a lot to be able to pull out what you need right away without disturbing the whole lot. Also, if security or customs officials want to see in, it’s much easier than unpacking and repacking the whole bag. If baggage handlers stomp in hobnailed boots over your beloved old little samsonite leaving torn footprint patterns (ahem. Thanks SO MUCH Air Canada), breaking the zipper and the wheels, not everything falls out onto dirty airport floors while you cry and shove it back in willy nilly.

    There are so many different ways to pack, and staying in one place for a few weeks in a luxury resort with porters will not require such nitpickiness as being in different places every couple of nights, carrying your own luggage up Paris subway stairs (very, very, very many stairs in Paris) or hiking up Positano from the beach to Chiesa Nuova worrying that banging your bag into every uneven stone in those 350 steps will break it and your stuff will cascade back down to the beach–then it’s quite useful to know your suitcase’s contents will be secure:) Okay that’s never happened to me–but unpacking and packing in your little hotel room is fast and easy with modules. Unpacking of course is seldom the problem. It’s digging in your bag at the airport, it’s packing up your stuff very fast to be ready to catch that flight, that’s when mesh bags are helpful.

    This is so off topic from laundry baskets, however packing and packing light are passions of mine, secondary only to the actual trip:) And of course you can toss the whole things into the washer when you get home if you want! I usually pack them too tightly for that but I have done it.

  • #208576

    irishbell
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    Okay, I’m beginning to get the hang of this idea.
    I will try it next time I’m packing, it really does make sense!

  • #210434

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    I donated 14 laundry baskets of all shapes and sizes this morning. How embarrassing. I hope someone else can use them.

  • #210451

    bandicoot
    Member

    Laundry Baskets-helpful tool or hindrance?

    momwalker, someone will use them.
    and meanwhile…..your place must be looking a lot lighter and clearer with fourteen of them gone!

    i have one in the kitchen….it has an umbrella in it and things like shopping totes.
    i am considering replacing it with a set of hooks that i thought i sent out for donation, but my husband recycled back!
    the hooks will be much easier, lighter, nicer to look at.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.