Home Forums Welcome Hello! hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

This topic contains 30 replies, has 21 voices, and was last updated by  AddressOurMess 3 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #158881

    sky2evan
    Member

    0. intro

    Really appreciate the forum. Learn quite a bit, ppl seem very nice & real. Don’t know anyone personally who is minimalist, & few who are uncluttered (except for some richer folk who pay people to clean their stuff & make their homes look uncluttered)–so it’s reaffirming to drop by & see some similar ideas & feelings.

    Decluttering to Minimalist was extraordinarily helpful to me, beyond my expectations. (Only discovered this forum until I was nearly done–but I’m more of a go-it-alone type anyway.) So I feel obliged to share my experience–mostly things I wish my pre-minimalist self would have known. Hopefully might be helpful to some considering minimalism, less so to those who aren’t. Also wrote this for my friends & family, so I wouldn’t have to explain myself multiple times. To avoid taking up public space on the forum, I did ponder setting up a dead blog (limited number of writings all at once, no updates), but I’m kind of busy & may never get around to that. So this is the essence. Long, though. Tried to shorten as much as possible, but hard. Like to be thorough & clear – and dislike having to explain or expound further. Many apologies to those who will consider this clutter.

    Separated below into 5 posts below for selective reading.
    1. The Why
    2. The How
    3. What was Left
    4. How I feel
    5. What I think

  • #173143

    sky2evan
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    1. The Why

    Never been a hoarder (even at my maximum, had less stuff than all my friends), but my main problem was being disorganized & cluttered. So I’ve done about 4 major decluttering waves over the past 20 years. (Never heard of Uncluttering, Minimalist Living, or Hoarders until a couple months ago – been living on a rock in Asia for the past 10 years, where it seems nobody voluntarily becomes minimalist.) Tossed about 30% each time, and was satisfied enough that I felt little need to declutter further. But stuff always slowly re-sprouted, due to changes in work, taste, lifestyle, hobbies, etc. Never back to the last previous level, but still an increase. Eventually, it would hit some subconscious personal threshold (gradually getting lower), triggering another decluttering.

    Hate the decluttering process–but love the end results. Same with other mundane Stuff Management tasks like cleaning, organizing, & moving. A waste of precious life Time & Energy. The whole point of decluttering is to free up Time & Energy, not to spend extra Time & Energy decluttering. Stuff is clingy & needy, calls for attention, and demands to be used & taken care of. Too much stuff becomes high-maintenance black holes, sucking Time, Energy, & Money, as well as attracting more stuff. The physics: Stuff = Mass = Gravity = More Mass. Fascinating & frightening.

    Fed up with stuff. So to End the distractions and decluttering cycles, and to reduce Stuff Management to a minimum, I made it my #1 short-term life priority to Eliminate most of the stuff. Whatever it took, asap.

    Wasn’t expecting anything positive to come from a Mass Destruction of my own stuff. Actually, I was bracing for the negativity of living in the subsequent Void of Empty Space, which I thought would be the lesser of 2 evils – I disliked Stuff Management that much. If I really hated it, I could always slowly buy stuff later.

  • #173145

    sky2evan
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    2. The How

    Instead of chipping away large chunks of Clutter Mountain (as in previous decluttering waves), this time I just bulldozed most of the mountain. Kept some Necessities, a few Luxuries, and deleted the Rest.

    Example: I used to have 50 pens in a small box. Before, like most people, I would’ve just evaluated each one individually in terms of its Function, Enjoyment, Value, & Sentiment (FEVS) – the main reasons why we keep stuff. Got fed up with this “traditional” method – too Time & Energy consuming. This time: I decided beforehand how many pens I needed, and of what type. For me: 2 tri-color ballpoints (1 back-up), and 1 fine point black. Then I laid out all 50 pens, chose the 3 which fit the description and had the highest FEVS. Ruthlessly donated or tossed the other 47–even the ones I liked.

    Was a bit worried at first – tended to lose a pen every 3 months. But I naturally became more careful: like my wallet, I designated proper places for them both at home & outside. That extra effort of care is far outweighed by the peace of mind of always knowing where, never wasting time looking for, and hopefully, rarely losing them. Been 5 months now – probably donate my back-up soon.

    Stunning realization for me: when you have less, what’s left means more. You tend to appreciate and take better care of what you have left – which means it’s likely to last longer, and save more Time, Money, & Space.

    But the benefits of 3 pens are still overwhelmed if they’re surrounded by 30 paper clips, 50 books, 10 extra towels, etc. Cluttered items/areas still have a way of“crowding”Uncluttered areas, both physically & mentally. And stuff stored out-of-sight, wasn’t completely out-of-mind, because subconsciously I still knew it was there. So I used this same Cut-to-a-Minimum procedure for every item category in my place–books, dish rags, pots, towels, linens, socks, paper clips, furniture, etc. Everything. Because every single item has Clutter Power.

    The method in short:
    1. Target an item category.
    2. Decide the Number I really needed of that category (usually between 0-5).
    3. Lay them out collectively & Compare.
    4. Choose the best/favorite/highest FEVS ones.
    5. Discard the rest.

    My main suggestion: in step 2, go as low as possible. We underestimate the Clutter Power of each item, so the After result is still often too much clutter – which is why it’s common to declutter the same area/category more than once. Also, we Overestimate an item’s benefits, and Underestimate the gains received when it’s eliminated… which is why most eliminated items are not regretted. In general, actually, we Overestimate what we need to be happy.

    Took me about 1-2 straight months to declutter to a state of minimalism. Like others, it seems, deciding what to Eliminate was fast – how & where to dispose of it was slow. Stuff–easy to come by, hard to get rid of.

  • #173148

    sky2evan
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    3. What was Left

    Along the way, I heard of the 100 Things Challenge, but those lists always seemed incomplete, unhelpful. They didn’t include boring, mundane,“Necessary”stuff like toilet brushes, trash cans, and bedsheets. Became so curious about what was Necessary for my lifestyle, that I began Accounting & categorizing all my remaining stuff onto a table List in Word, noting items that were favorites, to-be-upgraded, or uncertain.

    Had 165 items left. #1 was Clothing-related (38), followed by hangars (24), kitchenware (16), computer-related (11), stationery kit items (11), med kit items (9), document zipper envelopes (8), linens (7), cleaning tools (7), etc. That’s 131 right there. Plus, they’re mostly grouped accordingly in my home–with less stuff, it kind of organizes itself. I could still eliminate 30+ just by folding my clothes & getting a laptop, but some simple things have become Luxuries for me: clothes on wooden hangers, a bigger monitor, nice pair of small USB speakers.

    Love having just 165 items. Easy to remember & track. Not much to clean, organize, store, manage, or move. No ingenious storage or organizing solutions required. I know every-thing I own, exactly where it is, and can get it in under 30 seconds. If I lost everything in a disaster, I don’t think I’d care (money aside) – I have so little, I can replace nearly everything because of the Total Item List. Love having that List–gives me a complete overview of my ‘inventory’. Use it to both plan future purchases (mostly Upgrades & Recombinations) and even to declutter (the uncertain items).

    BTW, if you’re prone to overshopping & re-cluttering, Minimalizing might be one of the better antidotes – you’ll be more sensitive to the clutter power & hidden costs of every new item–costs in Space, Time, Energy, & Money. You won’t want to upset your newfound, peaceful equilibrium by letting too much new stuff in. For me, there’s absolutely no way I’m voluntarily going backwards to what now looks like a suffocating, bloated life where I’m overweighted, distracted, blinded, & imprisoned by my own Stuff.

    150-180 is my“Preferred Minimum Range” – it’s not for everybody. Your own Range, if you choose to aim for it, depends on different factors such as Age, Location/Climate, House Type/Condition, Work Status, Household Members Status, Life Goals, Hobbies, Preferences, etc. But most of these, except for Age, you affected in the past, & will affect in the future, with your own life choices.

    But 150-180 feels me. Too low, I sacrifice Convenience & Comfort. Too high, I sacrifice Space, plus more Time & Energy due to more Stuff Management. Either way, a lower Quality of Life. If I do any shopping, it’s to Downsize, Upgrade, Replace, or Recombine (get 1 multi-tasker to eliminate 2+ items). With less Quantity, I have to appreciate Quality a lot more. If I only have 1 of an item & use it regularly, then it has to be more Durable, Efficient, Comfortable, & Enjoyable. And also prefer Space-saving, Easy to clean/move, & Beautiful. Beautiful because any item stands out A Lot More when it’s surrounded by next to nothing. Gotten extremely picky – most stuff seems like packaged clutter now. So now I do a lot more Research before buying – but when I do find something that passes my QC, it’s like finding treasure in a sea of junk.

    Also, Upgrading doesn’t always cost a lot of money. After decluttering, my last remaining trash can stuck out like a sore blue thumb–it was blue & too big. So I downsized to a new trash can: a cheap, small, pearl, 7-inch plastic wastebasket. Cost $1.30. It’s the only trash can in my home, and I really like/appreciate it – first time in my life I can say that about a trash can. With fewer items, some seem to have developed sentimental & decorative power, and some Necessities have now acquired the aura of small Luxuries.

  • #173149

    sky2evan
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    4. How I feel

    I used to feel: Annoyed with clutter, shopping, and Stuff Management tasks. Frustrated looking for & losing things. Mild apprehension when others visited. Confusion about how to get & stay organized. So for me, a Minimalist existence has been Revolutionary. All those negatives about stuff seem to have disappeared once I disappeared the stuff.

    Now, I feel small, simple joys whenever I wake up and look at my place, open my wardrobe, use the bathroom, come home from work, sit at my computer/work table, swipe my kitchen counter, or get something without having to look for it–all neutral, mundane actions that I previously thought could never possibly produce “joy”. And with so little stuff around to distract me, it’s easier to not procrastinate, focus, be more productive, and even relax. Feel light, streamlined, efficient, centered, & great. All of this was amazing & unexpected–I never thought the presence or absence of physical stuff could have such a profound negative or positive effect on my inner state. Never felt this after my previous declutterings – probably because they weren’t Total, but only Partial declutterings (which produced partial results & partial peace/satisfaction, offset by Remaining Clutter). Extreme measures, extreme results.

    Minimalizing hasn’t delivered me to a state of total bliss – like most people, I still encounter problems in life. But what I am saying is,“home”(as opposed to the physical house) is no longer the source of any major problems for me, but rather a daily, streaming source of small, simple joys & peace that serves as a cushion & an island oasis for all the negative clutter I face outside in the world.

    I feel deep regret & sorrow for not Minimalizing earlier in life. In fact, if I could choose only 1 thing to redo from the past 38 years of my life, it would honestly be this. Not only for the greater peace, Clarity of mind, and improved quality of life that I could have experienced for more years of my life, but also for the better decisions and choices I probably would have perceived & made resulting from the greater peace, Clarity, & improved quality of life I would have had.

    Most dreams in life don’t come true. But for minimalizing, there IS a Light at the End of Your Tunnel. Get close to the End, and you’ll feel it – everything gets Lighter. So if you’re still in the dark, consider Running– it’s more strenuous, but gets you there faster. Decluttering only seems like a never-ending journey if you’re just walking–not challenging your personal limits & comfort zones. Low pain, slow gain. By reducing the pain & hassle of decluttering, you’re also postponing the pleasures & rewards.

    Destruction & Death can take an instant in time compared to Creation, Growth, or Rebirth (which often can’t take place without the former). Rome was built over decades & centuries, but sacking it took just days. So if decluttering one home is taking years, not enough sacking has been done–and the sacking probably hasn’t been sufficiently Prioritized, Ruthless or Efficient. If you take your time, you’re actually losing future time – time spent living at the Light at the End of Your Tunnel.

  • #173151

    sky2evan
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    5. What I think

    Minimalist Living is considered “Extreme”, which is why few people consider or try it. Minimalists appear to be voluntarily inflicting Extreme Losses on their own Quality of Life: a suicide of Comfort, Convenience, Variety, & FEVS. So the result of Less Stuff appears to be Extreme Boredom, Poverty, Impotence, and Asceticism.

    But Minimalist Living is like Minimalist Traveling. I rarely travel, yet when I do it’s always been One Bag (carry-on) my entire adult life–regrettably, it never occurred to me to employ this Minimalist principle to my home life. OBT sacrifices clothing options, variety, and other perceived “conveniences” & “comforts”, but gains increased travel convenience, comfort, freedom, peace of mind, mobility, schedule flexibility, and travel options–and saves Time, Money, Energy, & Space. Checking in/out, walking or running anywhere, waiting, using transportation, getting lost, meeting people, eating, napping, or even using the bathroom: with 1 carry-on bag, the quality of all these ordinary experiences are radically improved than if you’re lugging 2 or 3 bags.

    So the benefits Extremely outweigh the costs – that’s why most OBTers don’t go back to checked baggage. But at first, just like Minimalist Living, those benefits appear doubtful & invisible if you’re habituated to baggage. Hard to face & accept that your own baggage is weighing you down, and keeping you from maximizing your experience–it’s counterintuitive that the more you minimize & let go of what you have, the more you’ll get.

    Whether in Design, Art, Travel, or Living, Minimalism is Eliminating the Unessentials to Reveal & Focus on the Essentials. So Minimalist Living is just Eliminating the Unessential physical stuff, to allow greater Focus on your Life Essentials–whether you choose those to be your Career, Family, Relationships, Adventure, Personal Growth, Success, whatever–even your Essential physical stuff. Minimalism is therefore a Means to an End, and not an End in itself. It’s just a way to bring yourself Closer to Your Essentials. No more, no less–but that by itself is a Lot. Even if you’re not sure what your True Life Essentials are, Minimalizing will likely help you (or force you) to discover them. Too little physical stuff to distract & weigh you down at your current status quo. So I truly believe Minimalizing in Travel or Living is one of the single greatest positive changes you could make to improve your quality of experience.

    When you have less & less outside baggage, what you’re left more & more with is… your Self, and what’s inside you. Instead of relying on Stuff to bring you Happiness, Comfort, & Meaning, you have to rely more on your Self. That can be frightening, disconcerting, liberating, invigorating, and enlightening. Streamlining your Physical life causes you to spend less emotional & mental energy on physical Stuff Management–which in turn accentuates & streamlines your Emotional & Mental life. So decluttering towards minimalism, whether in Travel or Living, often becomes a process of rediscovering your Self.

    Minimalism isn’t Extreme–actually, it’s Natural & Inevitable. That’s not a matter of Opinion, but Reality. We’re all born as extreme minimalists, and we’ll all Die as such, owning only what is inside of us. And whether you believe in an Afterlife or Nothingness, both are pretty minimalist. On the verge of Death, whether you’re looking backwards or forwards, the last things on your mind will be your physical Stuff. So it’d be short-sighted to describe as “Extreme”, what one day we will all naturally & inevitably become.

  • #173159

    Sky
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    Well written, Sky2evan. I like the way you think.

  • #173205

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    Thank you so much for posting this information. I am not a minimalist “yet” but plan on heading more in that direction. Working on it right now, actually. Your posts are truly inspirational and helpful!

  • #173206

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    Thank you for your lovely post. I especially like “we Overestimate an item’s benefits, and Underestimate the gains received when it’s eliminated… which is why most eliminated items are not regretted.”

    So true! It’s very easy for me to declutter nowadays. The more I declutter, the more I realize I have less patience for clutter in my home. I’m almost down to my daily-use items. I don’t consider myself minimalist but I identify with a lot. 🙂

  • #173208

    Stacia
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    Love it. Thanks for sharing. I can really identify w/ the light traveling comparison. I love to travel lightly & this is a great way to think when applying it to my home. I also really like the idea of determining a # of things, then picking the best/favorite & ditching the rest.

  • #173215

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    These are beautifully-written and thought-provoking posts – thanks for taking the time to share them with us all.

  • #173232

    charmed2482
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    I loved these posts as well. I also like the idea of determining a set # of items to keep and then getting rid of the rest. I keep thinking about that idea and haven’t been able to force myself to just do it. I think I will give it another try.

    Like my BF has one pair of jeans, he gets by just fine with this one pair of jeans. He has like three pairs of work pants and then one other pair of drawstring pants. That’s it, I keep seeing his one pair of jeans and thinking, I wish I could live with one plain pair of jeans. I have way more than I need and I don’t even wear them all, they are just taking up space, so I need to get rid of some.

  • #173249

    irishbell
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    I don’t keep things I don’t wear or use, but I also won’t get rid of things just because I have more than one set/pair. If you can afford the “things” and it’s not hurting anybody to have them, if you’re using them- and you have space for them, I don’t understand this need to get rid of stuff just to be rid of it. I truly don’t get the desire for minimalism. I can see where it would be a challenge and interesting to see if you really could do it, but it just isn’t for me.
    I don’t judge others for living this way, nor would I judge anyone for having lots (unless it’s blatantly conspicuous and done for show). I’ve read several blogs on minimalism and it seems that the authors are somewhat judgemental of those who aren’t minimalists, and are telling us there’s something wrong if we need or want things. This site and forum really gives a better view of balance, as opposed to extreme thinking that others promote.
    I appreciate hearing others views on things and it’s really opened my eyes to lots of different views on life!

  • #173251

    bandicoot
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    i really enjoyed reading about your process/journey…..wonderfully written too!

  • #173284

    lottielot
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    wow, what a great series of posts, I think I will have to come back and digest them over several sessions but a few things really speak to me. I love ‘Stuff Management’, ‘stuff: easy to come by and hard to get rid of’ and the point about appreciating little things more when they’re not surrounded by lots of other things. But um, your thing about sacking: not really true! Smashing things doesn’t lead to a clean slate but a big mess to clean up 🙂 I like the idea of ruthless, efficient decluttering and having a goal of number of things though!
    One thing: this is all about you and your journey. What about other people in this process? For me, I actually feel that I’m quite capable of living a fairly simple and uncluttered life but my dh and my kids really mess that up big-style. And part of me rebels against their crap cluttering up my house and the other half thinks about my lovely neighbour who lives alone in her 70s and has a very clean, tidy, uncluttered tiny house. And I see myself in her situation in 30 years time and suddenly the mess seems a lot less important and the love and treasuring those moments of family life seems a lot more important.
    Anyway, thanks for sharing, I enjoyed reading your 5 things 🙂

  • #173324

    Jude2004
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    While some of this was useful, I kept wishing you would declutter your writing as much as your life.

  • #219493

    Caelaemum
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    This is so good, I made myself an ebook copy so I could read and highlight it. I love your approach, and it solves one of the big problems I have with decluttering: The objects and their placement in the house are too interconnected to clean up by zone.
    For example, I was cleaning out the front hall closet yesterday and found my son’s old booster seat for the car. Not actually old, he just moved up to a smaller booster seat last month. But I hadn’t put it out to the curb because I thought if I could just find the seatbelt straps that I had removed last year, wash the covers and reassemble it, it could be given to the local thrift store. Right. But finding the straps meant decluttering the pantry, where I THINK I might have stored them. You can see where this was going. So I made the decision to just set it out, unwashed, beside our neighbourhood dumpster. It’s already gone. Some neighbour with a booster seat ready child took it, probably washed it themselves and didn’t care about the missing infant seat belts that I had been stressing about.
    Your approach avoids the whole mess by asking us to look at categories rather than locations. I can see that by clearing up an entire group of like items, the ability to clean a zone will more easily be resolved. No longer am I looking at a bunch of unrelated junk that just happens to have landed in the same place, confusing my mind and paralysing my actions. This is more logical to my mind.
    Thanks for writing this, it’s honestly one of the very best pieces on HOW to become a minimalist I have ever come across.

  • #219495

    sleepykitten
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    I had missed these posts the first time around. Very helpful. I think the method of deciding how many of something one needs and then getting keeping only that number and getting rid of the rest makes a lot of sense. It takes a lot of fortitude, though, and I think for me that method breaks down for certain categories.

    Like for books. How many books do I need? Well…in pure abstract, numerical terms, technically I guess I don’t need any books, but I have some that I refer to over and over. So then it gets back to saying, “which books are those that I find indispensable?” and then I’m back to looking at the whole bookshelf one by one.

    A related strategy that is slightly less numbers-based is to go somewhere other than your house – like a cafe – and think about a space in your home or a category of thing and write down the items that are most important to you. Then go back home and keep only those items that you remembered to write down.

    I do envy your 165 things a smidgen. I thought I’d actually reached an uncluttering equilibrium, but posts like these make me wish I had even less. At the same time, I have a husband with his own things that I don’t have much control over, and I think even if I lived on my own, it would be incredibly tough to get below 300-400.

    From time to time, I’ve wondered about counting my things to see what I have…after a huge purge last month (two car-loads of stuff) it might be time to count, just out of curiosity.

  • #219514

    Sky
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    I just re-read sky2evan’s posts. Really interesting and makes me want to go through my whole house and unload tons of stuff!

  • #219528

    chacha1
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    I enjoyed this series, even though minimalism is not my bag (I love wallowing in my stuff!). I probably have more “things” in my kitchen than sky2evan has in his/her entire home. That’s okay though. 🙂

  • #219534

    Ella
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    I enjoyed reading this fascinating point of view. However, I don’t subscribe to the X number of things goal. I aim for quality of the things I have. Thus, not “I should have 50 books” but rather, “I should have books that I love and value” and it doesn’t matter if that number is 5 or 50 or 500+.

    I most appreciated the feelings expressed in “4. How I feel,” in particular this part:
    “…’home’ (as opposed to the physical house) is no longer the source of any major problems for me, but rather a daily, streaming source of small, simple joys & peace that serves as a cushion & an island oasis for all the negative clutter I face outside in the world.”

    Altogether, sky2evan’s views resonate in a timely way with the latest post by Leo Babauta on Zen Habits:
    http://zenhabits.net/mindful-simplicity/

    And lol, Jude2004! Uncluttered communication is the last frontier for many of us, myself included!

  • #219577

    sleepykitten
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    @Anita – although your I get your point about balance, I also think minimalists are searching for balance, but the equilibrium point is lower. I have now uncluttered pretty much all the things I don’t love or use, but I still have a nagging feeling that my things overpower me in my home. So maybe I need to get rid of some of the things I love and use EVEN THOUGH I love and use them to achieve a feeling of balance. I’m not sure.

    For now, I am taking a break from uncluttering because I think that in many ways I am “done” and I don’t think it is economically wise to get rid of items that have a known purpose in my life. But I often wonder if I need to set an arbitrary number – knowing it is arbitrary – to get to a point where I feel comfortable. The times I’ve felt like I had exactly the right amount of things (i.e. balanced), though, were times when I was younger, single, and didn’t have a professional job.

  • #219578

    Sky
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    Having a certain number of pens or clothes isn’t my goal. I would be scared to count all my stuff! What good is having one pair of scissors when it’s convenient to have a pair in the kitchen, office and my closet (to cut tags or strings off)? My goal is to have what we need but not in excess.

    I am mostly decluttered but it would be nice to have empty space and closets with room to spare so I keep rearranging and donating things.

    I do find minimalist spaces peaceful and look so clean but maybe a little cold?

  • #219579

    sleepykitten
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    @Sky – Agreed, but it is the “what we need” part that is so hard to define!

  • #219580

    Sky
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    sleepykitten, good point.

  • #219599

    Swede
    Member

    hi. my experience of decluttering to minimalist

    I have found that decluttering automatically turns in to more decluttering. Example: As I have decluttered most of my paperwork, I don’t need a stapler at home anymore. Or a box of paperclips. Or anything else I used to need when I had a lot of papers. As I have less things I need less things if that makes sence…

    The goals I had when I started decluttering have changed A LOT. At first I wanted to get rid of all the crap, but now I am really enjoying the lack of stuff so it’s easy not to bring in heaps of new things. Things don’t make me happy. I think I am now on the outskirts of being a minimalist. I just don’t have the same ties to “stuff” anymore. That being said I do still have a small box of childhood stuff and a smallish box of my old diaries and things that are important to me and I have plenty of art so it’s not me in an empty white space with a laptop only. 😉

  • #310293

    limitless north
    Participant

    There’s a great book that tackles the issue of Decluttering Your Life and Getting Organized. It’s available for FREE Download right now on amazon and is ranked #3 in the Self-Help Category.
    It’s not so much of a hand holder as it is a motivator. It should leave you feeling really inspired to take on your clutter, and it will provide you with some great tips to get started.
    Here’s a link and I hope it helps: http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Guide-Declutter-Organize-Mind-ebook/dp/B00SI9N40I/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1424330580&sr=1-1&keywords=the+ultimate+guide+to+declutter+your+life+and+organize+your+mind

  • #310384

    Magpie
    Participant

    This is a very well thought out and useful post. I am going to save it to refer to in future, in case this site ever goes down. Thank you so much for writing this. Very helpful!

  • #310643

    AddressOurMess
    Participant

    Unhoarding or deccluttering can often be a difficult process that needs to be resolved in a step by step manner. In many cases the hoarding is the result of a horrible event. This can result in trauma hoarding. You need to be careful when looking at the decluttering of the home from an outside perspective.

  • #310343

    Peter
    Participant

    Love your thinking and well-written post. I’d love to see your thoughts on what the last few years has taught you. I went through a period of decluttering a couple of years ago while moving. It was initially traumatic, but having a really small car was a great inducement to look at what I really needed. Needless to say, I only took what could fit in to my Mini. Over the lasdt couple of years, I have added only a few things that can be used immediately or in the future, in my case, good tools. They have a lifetime guarantee, whee!!

    Thanks for your sharing,
    Peter

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