Left-handed organizing

Tools are extensions of your hands. When you use proper tools, you decrease the possibility of injury, pain, and fatigue because they require less continuous force and can be used without awkward postures. The correct tool also reduce clutter because you have the best tool for a job and aren’t constantly purchasing the same item repeatedly in search of the ideal tool for you. How you complete processes is similar, too, because when you work in the best way suited for you work times are reduced, you’re more organized, and more comfortable.

When fellow Unclutterer, Dave talked about the value of his utility knife, I had to agree with him. However my utility knife is different from Dave’s because mine is a left-handed utility knife.

If you’re a southpaw or live or work with one, the following are some productivity and organizing tips that might be beneficial for you.

Buy good quality left-handed tools. As stated earlier, the proper tool for the job is essential. It will lead to increased productivity, less fatigue, and fewer injuries. Start with the tools used most often such as scissors, can openers, vegetable peelers and even manicure scissors. Consider purchasing other left-handed equipment that can make certain tasks easier, such as gardening shears and sewing scissors.

Set up your personal space. On the desk of a lefty, the pen caddy would be placed on the left side and the telephone on the right side. Because lefties sit facing the right side of the desk, the desk lamp should be placed on the right side as well. Professional organizer Julie Bestry has a great post about left-handed notebooks that might help lefties increase productivity.

Set up shared spaces together. When lefties and righties share space, it can be a bit more difficult to be organized and productive.

Sometimes shared spaces can be set up ambidextrous, for example, putting the telephone in the centre of the desk so it can be answered with either hand. Alternatively determine who uses the space for a greater period of time and set it up according to that person’s hand preference.

Research indicates that individuals show a preference for the use of one hand, and it is not always the same hand for two different tasks. This suggests that right- or left-handers are not general categories, but rather are defined as a function of the tasks. For example, many lefties prefer to use their computer mouse with their right hand so a shared computer would have the mouse on the right hand side. This means when people work together to organize a space they can develop solutions that will allow all users of the space to be productive.

For a great overview on left-handedness you may wish to read, “Why are some people left-handed? An evolutionary perspective.

For left-handed shopping try:

Keeping your tech gadgets clean

On Sunday, I watched the post-game show after the New England Patriots won the Super Bowl. As the victors lifted the shiny Lombardi Trophy high above their heads, I thought, “Wow, that thing is covered in fingerprints.”

Unfortunately, the same can be said for some of my favorite tech gadgets. Like many other tablets and smartphones, Apple’s iPad and iPhone literally require you to touch, tap, and swipe your fingers all over their screens. Even computer screens are occasionally touched or tapped as you try to point out something on the screen. Keeping up with all the fingerprints can feel like a losing battle, but that doesn’t mean you should just give up on cleaning. The following are a few ways you can keep your tech gadgets relatively clean.

Smartphones

Nobody wants a stylus” quipped Steve Jobs when he introduced the iPhone to the world in 2007. Sometimes, when I’m wiping my iPhone’s screen against my jeans, I wonder if he was wrong about this. Ugh!

To give your smartphone (iPhone or otherwise), a good cleaning, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure it’s turned off.
  2. Wipe with a soft, slightly damp, lint-free cloth. Avoid getting any moisture on any of the openings.
  3. Clean the Home Button with a dry, lint-free cloth only.

There are a couple things NOT to do, too:

  1. Do not use household cleaners, sprays, solvents, or any abrasives. All of these could harm your phone. For example, the iPhone’s screen features an oleophobic coating that’s meant to repel oils like those found in fingerprints. Household cleaners can reduce that coating’s effectiveness.
  2. Never spray your phone directly with a cleaner. As I’ve said, apply a slightly damp cloth to the screen.

Follow these steps every other day (less often if your phone is in a case) and your phone should remain relatively clean.

Tablets

A lot of the same rules apply to tablets as cell phones. Use a slightly damp, lint-free cloth, except on the Home Button, power button, or openings like the headphone port. Do not spray any liquids directly onto the tablet, and don’t use the types of cleaners I described earlier. Since a tablet’s screen is made of glass, it’s tempting to use window cleaner. Don’t.

Give your tablet a good wipe-down once per week.

Computers

Desktop and laptop computers are handled much less often than their mobile counterparts. Still, they do need a good cleaning occasionally. As you did with your tablet and phone, make sure your computer is off before giving it a good cleaning. That slightly damp, lint-free cloth is back on duty here, and can be safely used on the screen and chassis of your computer.

Again, keep moisture away from all ports and openings, and never spray directly onto the screen. Clean your computer once per month.

Keyboards

When it comes to keyboards, things can get nasty. Many keyboards are overdue for a good cleaning. In fact, it’s a good idea to regularly disinfect your keyboard.

  1. Disconnect your keyboard from your computer or, if it’s a wireless model, remove the batteries.
  2. Use a not-too-wet disinfectant wipe to clean an area, then use a dry, lint-free cloth to dry that area.

Again, there are a few things NOT to do.

  1. Don’t use wipes that contain bleach or any sprays.
  2. Avoid excessively damp wipes.
  3. Don’t let liquid pool.
  4. Avoid rough towels like paper towels.
  5. Clean your keyboards every other week.

Cleaning your gadgets only takes a few minutes and is well worth it.

5 more of my favourite organizing tools

Last Monday, I wrote about my “Five favorite organizing tools” that have been essential in the various homes in which we have lived. My list of favorites doesn’t stop there. The following are five more of my favourites.

Heavy-duty plastic shelving. Shelves are great because they allow you to use vertical space without piling items on top of each other. These shelves can be assembled and disassembled in minutes. Each shelf holds over 55kg (125lbs) of stuff and because they are made of plastic, they do not rust or mildew and they are not susceptible to water damage. They are ideal for garden sheds, garages, and basements.

Vacuum storage totes. These totes are useful for storing off-season clothing. We have several that store extra curtains that don’t fit the house in which we currently live, but may fit the next house we move to (as a military family, we move around so much they’re worthwhile to keep). Besides keeping textiles clean and dust-free, the totes stack nicely in closets and storage areas, whereas bags do not stack well.

Plastic filing boxes. Filing cabinets are handy for frequently accessed paperwork but for long term storage, filing boxes are great. They are plastic so they keep papers dry and dust free. They are easy to lift and stack. And each person in our family has one for souvenirs such as report cards, certificates, letters of reference, performance reviews, etc. One of their disadvantages, however, is they are not lockable. When moving houses, I tape them shut and sign and date the tape.

Collapsible fabric boxes. These boxes come in many pretty colours that will coordinate with any room. In various different houses we’ve use these boxes in entryways to store hats and mittens. In clothing closets they’ve held purses, sweaters, and other clothes. We’ve also used them to store hand towels and face cloths in linen closets as well as table clothes and napkins in the dining room. The thing I like about these boxes as opposed to baskets is that if you don’t need them they fold flat to save space.

Cordless power tools. In my opinion cordless power tools are the best things since sliced bread. There is no more hunting around for electrical outlets or searching for and tripping over extension cords. Many brands such as Ryobi, DeWalt and Makita sell cordless tool kits that come with extra batteries and a handy carrying case so you have everything you need in one nice, easy-to-store kit. Cordless tools work internationally as well. When we moved from Canada to the UK, all we needed to do was to buy a battery charging station that worked on the UK power grid and all of our power tools were ready to go.

Mise en place beyond the kitchen

Thomas Keller is one of the most respected chefs around; his restaurants Per Se and The French Laundry have won numerous awards. So when Keller gives advice, as he did in his book Ad Hoc at Home, it’s worth listening. Greg Baugues points to the following excerpt:

Being organized — as we say in our kitchen, ‘working clean’ — is a skill to develop. We call it mise-en-place, French for, literally, ‘put in place.’ The term can be very specific, referring to ingredients needed to complete a recipe, measured out and ready to use, or it can be more general: are you organized, do you have everything you need to accomplish the task at hand?

Good organization is all about setting yourself up to succeed. It means getting rid of anything that would interfere with the process of making a recipe or preparing an entire meal.

On Unclutterer, we’ve written about mise en place before, but this quote got me thinking (as it did for Bauges) about how we can extend the concept beyond the kitchen.

For example, my mise en place for going anywhere in the car involves having the following items with me:

  • My wallet with my credit cards, ATM card, driver’s license, medical and auto insurance cards, auto club card and a set amount of cash
  • My keys
  • My smartphone, charged up, with interesting podcasts loaded and with driving instructions (if needed) ready to go
  • A full water bottle and some energy bars
  • If shopping is involved: some reusable tote bags and any coupons I plan to use
  • At least a half tank of gas (because if there’s an earthquake, getting gas might be difficult)

All of these items have their specific places, too, so that they’re readily available when I need them.

Having once had a minor accident in a parking lot, and discovering to my horror that the insurance card in my wallet was out of date, I know how important it is to make sure I do indeed have everything in order. And I know how discombobulated I feel if I forget my water bottle, even for a short trip.

But the “getting rid of things” part applies, too. It’s easier to listen to new podcasts if I’ve deleted the ones I’ve already listened to. And my car will be better prepared for future trips if I’ve made sure to remove everything that doesn’t need to be there: purchases from prior trips, the wrapper from an energy bar eaten on the last long drive, etc. If I’m making an emergency run to the doctor with a neighbor, as I did recently, I need to ensure the passenger seat and floor space are clean, not loaded with stuff that shouldn’t be in the car.

Another example: Any home improvement or repair project (assembling furniture, fixing a leak, and so on) will go much easier with an appropriate mise en place. Having all the necessary tools right at hand and having a clean workspace for using them will avoid all sorts of problems.

Do you use a mise en place equivalent for tasks beyond cooking? If so, please share in the comments.

Five favourite organizing tools

In the past 20 years, I’ve lived in eight different homes. Over this time period, I’ve come to realize there are some essential tools I have used in every home to get organized. The following are five of my favourites.

Expandable half-shelves. Many homes in which we have lived did not have adjustable shelving in the kitchen cupboards. Expandable half-shelves have allowed us to store more dishes in the cupboards and be able to access them easily. We also have used expandable half-shelves in bathroom cupboards to organize toiletries and cleaning supplies. I’ve even used a half-shelf behind my computer to save space by storing the external hard drive above the power bar.

Drawer organizers. We have dozens of drawer organizers and we use them everywhere. Most of the houses in which we live have odd-sized kitchen drawers that do not fit a standard cutlery tray. We use drawer organizers to keep our cutlery in order. We also use drawer organizers in bathroom and nightstand drawers. Drawer organizers help keep our office supplies in order and we also use them in our large toolbox so we can find what we need easily.

Plastic shoeboxes. I use these boxes to organize my shoes in my closet. I really like these boxes. They are transparent so I can immediately see the contents. They have tight fitting lids and they stack easily. They are useful for storing and organizing so many things beyond shoes, too. I’ve grouped all my sewing and craft supplies into these boxes so I can easily find them. We use one for our first-aid kit, one for holding our medications, and another for dental care supplies. Our electronics and gaming gear are also stored in these shoeboxes.

Plastic drawer cart. We’ve lived in houses that have not had any storage space in the bathroom. These carts have been extremely useful to store hairbrushes, cosmetics, shaving supplies, and extra rolls of toilet paper. Because they are plastic, they are not susceptible to water damage like wood or metal storage units. We have used these carts in other areas of the house to organize toys, art supplies, and office supplies. They also function well in entryways to keep mittens, toques, and scarves in order.

Rubbermaid 14 gallon (55L) Roughneck Tote. There are several reasons I really like this particular bin. I find it easy to carry safely even when it is quite heavy. The handles are well designed allowing for a good solid grip, my arms are a comfortable distance apart, and I can keep the tote close to my waist. We store off-season clothing, sports equipment, toys, paperwork, and holiday decorations in these totes. Another reason I like these totes is they are made from plastic that doesn’t get brittle and crack or break in cold temperatures. This is essential for storing items in cold Canadian attics, garages, and non-climate controlled storage units.

Home maintenance

Buying a house is the biggest expense many people make. In order to keep the property’s value from depreciating, regular upkeep is important. Even if you do not own your own home, you may be required to perform specific maintenance tasks as part of your rental agreement.

If you have recently moved to a new area, you may find that some tasks that you may have done in your previous home may not be applicable in the new home or may need to be done at a different time of the year. There also may be tasks you’ve never done that you now have to complete.

The former owners of your home or your landlord may be able to provide you with a list of required maintenance. The staff at your local hardware store may also be able to provide you with beneficial information since they know the area and materials. Your municipality or town council will often provide details on outdoor maintenance such as maximum heights of trees and hedges and during what periods of the year these plants should be trimmed.

Neighbours who have homes of similar age and design can be a valuable resource, too. For example, in one town where we lived, our neighbour told us that we needed to clear leaves and debris to ensure water would flow freely through the culvert under our driveway because if the water started to accumulate, it would cause flooding in our basement. We were very grateful for this information.

It can be hard to keep track of maintenance tasks because many of them are done only once per year. Checklists can help ensure these important jobs are completed. Both Microsoft and The Art of Manliness offer thorough home maintenance checklist templates. You will probably need to modify these checklists for your climate and to suit the type of home you have.

If you need to hire a professional trades person to perform specific services, such as furnace or chimney cleaning, you may find that during certain times of the year it can be almost impossible to get an appointment. Lifehacker provides a Google calendar to which you can subscribe and get reminders of what needs to be done and when. With the Google calendar, you can also add in reminders to book service personnel.

Home appliances, including lawn mowers, snow blowers, barbeques, and automatic garage door openers need maintenance, too. Most instruction/warranty books for your appliances will explain routine maintenance tasks that you can add to your spreadsheet. If you do not have the instruction/warranty book you can usually download it from the manufacturer’s website. It’s also very nice to keep these maintenance records in perpetuity for reference, remembering who serviced items if you used a company and if you were happy with that service, budget planning, and to eventually pass along to the next owner of your home.

Remember to include routine safety and security maintenance to your schedules. Check your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, fire extinguishers, emergency escape ladder, and your home alarm system.

Getting past uncluttering stumbling blocks

Some things are fairly easy to get rid of: broken items that will never get repaired, excess food storage containers that are missing their lids, etc. But other items are harder to deal with and might delay your uncluttering project, including the following:

Inherited stuff

You don’t need to keep something just because it belonged to a beloved relative. If it’s something you don’t like and don’t use, and it has been stored in the back of a closet for years, it’s not serving anyone. Personally, I think it honors the memory of that relative much more to get the item back in use, even if the person using it isn’t you. Remember that most relatives, given their love for us, would not want us to be burdened by their things.

Maybe another family member would appreciate having the inherited item. If not, it can be given away, thus taking on a new life as part of someone else’s home. Depending on the circumstances, the new owner might even appreciate hearing the story behind it.

And before you give the item away, you can always take a photo of it to serve as a smaller keepsake.

Potentially useful stuff

These are the “I might use it someday” things. Here you need to evaluate the trade-offs between keeping the item and passing it along. The following are some questions to consider:

  • Is it worth giving this item space in your home today because it might be useful at some future time?
  • How likely is it that you’re really going to use it?
  • If you give it away and wind up needing something like it later on, could you borrow one from someone else?
  • If you had to rebuy it, would that be difficult or expensive?
  • If you wind up needing something like this seven years from now, would the one you have now even be likely to meet your future needs? (Some things are timeless, but others aren’t.)
  • If someone else could make good use of the item right now, would giving it to that person make more sense than having it sit on a shelf in your home, so you have it “just in case”?

Other people’s stuff

This category is often filled with things that belong to adult children who no longer live at home. If those children are still fairly transient and living in a limited space, such as a college dorm room, you may want to keep storing these things for them, for the time being.

But if the stuff is taking up space you want for other purposes and you’ve had it for ages, you may decide it’s time for a change. If the owners live some distance away from you, consider sending them photos and letting them know you’ll be donating any items they don’t specifically tell you they want, and include a deadline for responding to you.

Be sure you also set a date in the not-too-distant future by which the owners will pick up the items they’ve asked you to keep. Alternatively, make arrangements to have the items mailed or shipped to them.

Ask Unclutterer: Creating categories

Reader Eza recently noted the following concern in the comment section of the post “How to get started organizing”:

I have huge problems figuring out how to categorise the items I want to keep and how to put them away. I have lots of empty drawers and shelves because I can’t figure out what to put where.

Eza, you’re not alone in this regard. And there’s no one right answer — different categories will work for different people in different situations.

Certainly there are some general principles about what to place where, such as storing frequently used items as close as possible to where they will be used, and using the most easily accessible space for the things used most often. The things you use only once a year can go in those top cabinets that are hard to reach — or in a storage room, storage closet, or garage — while the things you use every day are kept right at hand.

However, there will be plenty of individual variation in how people categorize. Let’s take the example of a kitchen. Some of the common categories people will have are silverware, cooking utensils, food storage containers, dishes, glasses, serving pieces, pots and pans, spices and herbs, food items in various subgroups (if not kept in a separate pantry), etc.

Sometimes people will create categories such as “morning coffee supplies” or “school/office lunch-making supplies” to make commonly performed activities easier. “Lunch-making supplies” may include food storage containers, napkins, and nonperishable food items — things that would normally be in three different categories.

Another example: If two people share a kitchen but tend to use different things, creating categories of “Person 1’s stuff” and “Person 2’s stuff” can make sense. If Person 1 likes certain teas or cooks with certain spices, it might work best to keep them separate from Person 2’s very different teas and spices.

Going beyond the kitchen, let’s turn to the clothes closet. Clothes can be categorized by type of garment (pants, jacket, shirt/blouse, etc.), use (work, casual, formal/party, etc.), season, or color — or by any combination of those. Generally, the fewer the items you have, the fewer categories you need. Someone who only owns seven pairs of pants will have different needs than someone with 50.

Whatever type of things you are organizing, remember that categories are intended to make you life easier. You may want to keep all spare light bulbs together in one category — but if certain bulbs are only used in one room, you may want to store them there rather than with all the rest. A pair of scissors may be part of your office supplies or your giftwrapping supplies — and if you use scissors often for both office work and wrapping, you may want two pairs so you can store them as part of both categories. While keeping like items together is a good general principle, there are times when it makes sense to separate them.

And the following are two suggestions about implementation of any categorization scheme:

  1. When you first set up your storage, you may want to label the outside of the drawers for a while, until you get used to what’s being stored where.
  2. As you begin your organizing, don’t worry about defining your categories and their locations perfectly. Whatever you choose doesn’t have to be final. You can always try something for a while, see what works well and what doesn’t, and adjust accordingly.

Thank you, Eza, for asking such as good question.

Do you have a question relating to organizing, cleaning, home and office projects, productivity, or any problems you think the Unclutterer team could help you solve? To submit your questions to Ask Unclutterer, go to our contact page and type your question in the content field or put your inquiry in the comments to a post. If you send an email, please list the subject of your email as “Ask Unclutterer.” If you feel comfortable sharing images of the spaces that trouble you, let us know about them. The more information we have about your specific issue, the better.

How to get started organizing

As we begin each new year, many people resolve that this is the year they’re going to get organized. It’s a great goal, but it can also be intimidating. How do you begin? The following are seven tips:

Set realistic expectations

No one’s home looks like those featured in glossy magazines. Instead of aiming for that look, set your “organized enough” goals. For example, your goals might include being able to find things when you need them, having room to park your car in your garage, getting rid of the clothes your children have outgrown and the toys they no longer use, etc.

Decide on a schedule that works for you

If you have a major uncluttering/organizing project to do, you could do it short bursts of 15 minutes per day. Or you could decide to at least jump-start the project with a dedicated day where you just focus on your project. There’s no one right answer, so figure out what works best for your personality and what fits with your other time demands.

Unclutter first, then organize

There’s no point in putting things nicely into bins if they are things you don’t really want or need to keep. Do the uncluttering first, and then organize what’s left. If you do things in the reverse order, you may find you’ve bought containers that you don’t need, which then become container clutter.

Don’t get held up by the tough stuff

If you’re sorting through things making keep-or-not decisions and come upon something you’re conflicted about, it’s okay to just keep that item for now and move on. People often unclutter in phases, doing the more obvious things first.

Ask yourself good questions

“Have I used this in the past year?” isn’t always the most helpful question. Some other ones to consider are:

  • Would I buy this again today?
  • For clothes: Would this ever be my first choice of something to wear?
  • For reference books and papers: If I needed to know something about this, would I pull out this book (or these papers) or would I just search online?

Use good tools

You don’t want to be fighting with your frequently used tools. If you’re going to be doing a decent amount of shredding, invest in a good quality shredder. (I wasted a lot of time dealing with paper jams before I got a better shredder.) If you like filing papers in binders and you need to hole-punch papers for that, a good quality hole punch will save you a lot of effort.

Identify places to donate those things you don’t want

If you have items in good condition, there’s probably a place that would be glad to have them. Identify the organizations in your area that take donations, and then be sure you know the hours they accept donations and exactly which items they want. You may also want to consider using the free section of Craigslist or participating in your local freecycle group. (Search for your city name and the word freecycle in your favorite search engine to find one.)

Eliminate unwanted email subscriptions

One of the things I love to do in January is to unsubscribe from unwanted email lists, newsletters, digital sales fliers, and so on. After spending 11 months ignoring them whenever they show up, it’s time to get rid of them entirely. In this post I’ll explain a few ways to purge electronic mail lists from your email inbox, from one-at-a-time to bulk action.

It’s my fault for subscribing in the first place, of course. Often when I do, my intentions are good. I’ll find a new site or service that I’m interested in and think, “Yes, I do want to keep up to date with this company’s stuff.” Once I’ve done that a dozen times, I’m in trouble. Digital clutter is just as insidious as its real-world counterpart, so it’s time to make a change.

Identify likely candidates

I’m not opposed to email subscriptions. There are many that are quite useful (like the Unclutterer email subscriptions, obviously). Therefore, the first step in this process is to identify the ones you’ll get rid of in your purge versus the ones you wish to keep. I do this via a week of mindful email reading. Each day, I’ll make a mental note of the subscriptions I simply delete without reading. If you like, create a folder for these, mark them with a flag or otherwise tag them for future reference. When I did it, I just wrote a list on a piece of paper.

Let the culling begin!

There are a few ways to unsubscribe from unwanted email. If you’ve only got a few to jettison, you could go the manual route. If you look closely in the footer of the email you receive, you’ll see something along the lines of “click to unsubscribe” or simply “unsubscribe.” You might have to look closely, as it’s sometimes hard to find. The message’s sender wants to keep your attention, after all. Clicking this link will bring you to a webpage that likely has further instructions. Many will unsubscribe you then and there, while others will have you jump through additional hoops. It’s kind of a hassle, but worth it when the result is less junk mail. Of course, this method is too time-consuming if you’ve got a long list of unwanted subscriptions. In that case, consider one of the following:

Unroll.me. Not only does Unroll.me help you kill unwanted subscriptions, it makes the keepers more manageable by presenting them in a single, daily digest email. You can even roll things like messages from Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube into that single message. Tidy!

Mailstrom. This is another service that lets you cull hundreds or thousands of messages at once and send them all to the big, virtual trash bin in the sky, while keeping the messages you want to see intact. Plus, it works with the email solution you’re probably already using, as it’s compatible with Gmail, Google Apps Email, Outlook, Apple, Aol, and Exchange IMAP.

A tip for Gmail users. If you’re using Gmail, take a close look at the top of a message. You’ll likely see an “Unsubscribe” link. Google has made this a uniform location for this link, which is great, as it saves you from scouring a message’s footer for the hard-to-find default link.

Unlistr. Finally, this is a service that does the dirty work for you. Simply identify the email senders you don’t want to hear from anymore, and Unlistr does the rest, unsubscribing for you. Thanks, Jeeves!

Apps to track your fitness

Improving fitness and health is a popular New Year’s resolution. And scientists who study such things have found that keeping track of your workouts can help with reaching your goals. Tracking helps you monitor your progress and that is beneficial because increased strength and endurance are often hard to perceive. Also, it is much easier to remember your workouts when you see them rather than trying to remember what exercises you need to do or what weights you need to use.

Pen, paper, and notebooks are ideal for recording and monitoring your progress. You can record as date, time, workout description, weight levels, repetitions with as much or as little information as you wish. There is no special technology required and it is very cost effective. However, your notebook may be too bulky to carry with you back and forth to the gym and it may be time consuming to re-write the same information over and over again. It isn’t easy to see the information in a graphical format either, which is why I recommend apps you can access on your smartphone, tablet, or other digital devices.

Fitbit is a bracelet that tracks your steps, calories burned, and distance travelled. It syncs with your smartphone and provides a daily report of how active you are. There are several models of bracelets. The most basic models track steps, calories burned, and distance. The more advanced models track heart rate, sleep quality, and have a built in GPS tracking system. With the Fitbit website you can set goals, earn badges for reaching your goals, and connect with other Fitbit users to create a support network.

Abvio is a software company that makes three easy-to-use apps for your smartphone that can be used to track your workouts: Cyclemeter, Runmeter, and Walkmeter. All three apps allow you to record splits, intervals, and laps. They also have maps, graphs, announcements, and built-in training plans. These apps will sync with different types of sport watches that monitor heart rates. Cyclemeter can connect to some types of bicycle computers to record cadence as well. Abvio does not have its own website, but the data from the apps can be exported and uploaded into various other social fitness sites.

Those who participate in different types of sports such as yoga, martial arts, or horseback riding, may wish to consider The Athlete’s Diary. It is a multisport computer log, available for both computers and smartphones. It has a special-purpose database program designed for athletes and keeps track of the date, sport, category (training, interval, or race), distance, time, pace, route/workout, and has an area for comments. The Athlete’s Diary syncs with your computer and smartphone through Dropbox so you can use either device to enter your fitness data.

Virtual Trainer Pro is a really unique app for your smartphone. It is a database of hundreds of exercises, each demonstrated in a video by a fitness expert. You can create your own routines easily by dragging and dropping the exercises into the order you wish to follow or you can use one of thousands of ready-to-use workouts. Tracking your score and earning points and medals will help to keep you motivated.

There are many other apps available for monitoring fitness progress. Some are sport specific, others also allow you to track caloric intake and nutritional information. It doesn’t matter if you’re just starting out or you’re a serious fitness pro, being organized and tracking your fitness information will help you to reach your fitness goals.

A different kind of uncluttering

As we approach the end of the year, I know many people who are uncluttering their homes and offices to start the new year fresh. But there’s another kind of uncluttering you may want to consider: old relationships.

Friendships

There’s someone I knew 30 years ago who I used to keep in touch with through periodic phone calls, at least on her birthday. A few years ago I stopped making the calls, because I realized this was mostly just a habit, and maintaining the relationship (even in this minor way) simply wasn’t important to me any more.

How do you know when it might be time to let a friendship fade away? As organizer Monica Ricci wrote:

Ask yourself, “If I met this person TODAY would they be someone I would choose to engage in a friendship or other relationship with?”

We change over time, so it’s not surprising that our friendships might change, too. Some old friendships endure, while others may not.

Our social time is limited, and choosing who we want to spend our time with may be one of the most important choices we make. I’m willing to have some relationships end so I have more time to spend with those people whose presence in my life I truly treasure.

Social media relationships

I often see people complaining about the things their Facebook friends write, which makes me wonder why they keep these people as Facebook friends. You’re under no obligation to stay connected on Facebook (or any other social media) with people whose words only make you angry on a regular basis. So go ahead and unfriend on Facebook or unfollow on Twitter when that makes sense.

For close family members who you feel an obligation to befriend on social media, things are more complicated. You could unfollow them (Facebook) or mute them (Twitter) so you don’t see their posts — they won’t be notified that you’ve done that, and you’ll no longer see their aggravating comments. But this type of action does bring the risk of missing some important news which they are assuming you’d see.

Business relationships

Have you been using the same service providers (doctor, lawyer, accountant, auto mechanic, veterinarian, barber or hair stylist, etc.) for a long time? Sometimes it’s because the service you receive continues to be outstanding, as with the contractor I’ve used since I bought my house 25 years ago. But other times things change in ways that degrade that service. Businesses change hands, lose key employees, move to new locations that aren’t convenient, and so on. If there’s a key service provider you’re using who you’re not enthusiastic about, consider asking for recommendations for someone new.

Groups of people

As with individuals, the groups of people you fill your life with might need to change over time. Such groups would include spiritual communities, book clubs, professional groups, charitable groups where you volunteer, and more. Such communities always change members over time. If you’re a member of one that is no longer feeling right for you, it may be time to part ways and make space for a new community. You may also feel you’re overcommitted as a member of too many groups, and it’s time to pull back.