Calendly is fantastic for easy, organized scheduling

I recently wrote about a few tech options for busy summer scheduling. After that article was published, I ran across Calendly, and now I’m wishing I could to back in time and mention that app in that post.

Seeing as time travel is not yet possible, I’ve decided to mention the app independently. I’m loving Calendly because it’s a hands-off, passive solution for scheduling. It lets you share a single link with potential collaborators, and it automatically accounts for what you already have on your schedule.

When you first create an account, you can link Calendly to Google Calendar or Microsoft’s Office 365. Once the accounts are linked, the app’s features are pretty impressive.

Let’s say you’re trying to schedule a time to talk with someone on Skype. All you need to do is send a person your personal Calendly link, and the service looks at your calendar and sees when you’re free. The person you’re trying to get together with can click any day, and Calendly automatically offers your available time slots to that person, based on what’s on your calendar. They click the one that works for them, adding an event to your calendar and sending you a notification.

As you add more calendar events, your availability in Calendly changes in real time. I’ve been using it for a week now and am hooked.

Note that there is both a free and a paid plan. The latter offers features like team scheduling, automated reminders, and an option to remove the Calendly branding, should you be using the service for business.

Get the most out of an older iPad

It’s amazing to think that Apple’s iPad turns five years old this year. It’s so ubiquitous in 2015 that it seems like it has been around for a lot longer. Even old models are still in use, which brings me to my motivation for writing this article.

I own an iPad 2. It was released in March of 2011 and it’s still alive and kicking. Apple has even noted that the next update to its operating system, dubbed “iOS 9”, will run on the aging device. Still, it’s not as zippy as its younger siblings.

If you’ve got an older iPad around and have been wondering about its usefulness, let me point out these great ways to keep it useful and in service. The following are four ways to use an older iPad.

As a cable-free TV

I’ll admit it, I use my iPad 2 to watch TV shows and movies quite often. More often than my actual TV, in fact. There are a slew of apps out there that make this happen, including:

  • Netflix: TV, movies and great original content
  • Hulu: A stronger focus on TV than Netflix, but it has movies, too
  • Crackle: Sony’s streaming service has plenty of movies
  • HBO Go/HBO Now: The former is a free add-on for HBO subscribers, while the latter is a stand-alone subscription at $14.99 per month, and both allow you access to HBO programming
  • Amazon Instant Video: A video streaming service that’s included with the company’s Prime membership at $99 per year
  • Your cable provider: If you have cable television or internet, your service may have an app that lets you stream television to your iPad

As a remote control

Don’t want to cut the cable cord? Or maybe perhaps you prefer to enjoy TV and movies on your actual television? No problem. Most TV manufacturers offer universal remote apps. Additionally, if you use the Apple TV, there’s a free Remote app ready to go.

It might not fit into your “Remote Boat,” but the iPad does a good job of controlling your TV. And it reduces clutter by limiting you to one remote instead of a pile.

Weather Station

A friend of mine has this super-cool wireless weather station at his house that I really like. Realizing that an app is cheaper than a whole new piece of hardware, I went looking for a compatible app and found WunderStation. This great-looking app provides a wealth of weather information that you can browse in real time. You can also customize its presentation so that it’s displayed just how you want. Add a handy wall mount and you’ve got a very cool weather station.

Kitchen Helper

I’ve been using my iPad in the kitchen pretty much from day one. Of course it’s great for storing recipes and keeping them handy for when you want to cook. But you can increase its usefulness with a kitchen-friendly stand. I use a ‘fridge mount from Belkin to keep my iPad 2 away from messy spills while I’m cooking.

Alternatively, you can use a Chef Sleeve or go low-tech (but just as effective) with a zip-top kitchen bag.

It’s funny to think of something that’s only five years old as near the end of its usefulness, but such is the nature of tech. However, I think the iPad is an exception. The usefulness for this device has certainly exceeded its cost at this point, and I plan to use it for many more years to come.

Online tools for easy summer scheduling

Ah, summer. Those three balmy months when school is out and many people are spending their vacation time. It’s great to get away and relax, and potentially tricky to work with collaborators. Instead of playing phone tag — or worse, email tag — consider some of these fantastic online tools that let everyone you wish to participate in a meeting list their schedule availability.


A long-time favorite of mine, Doodle lets you pick several potential dates for your meeting or event and invite others to check off what works for them. Once everyone has participated, it’s easy to see what’s going to work and what isn’t. Doodle is free to use, though a paid option is available, which includes a custom domain, custom design options and more. But for quick-and-dirty scheduling, the free version works perfectly.


ScheduleOnce is another option with a very nice feature: Google integration. Once connected to Google Calendar or Gmail, ScheduleOnce will populate those tools with the scheduling information added by your participants. That means one less step in the process of getting your meeting arranged. I like that.

Schedule Thing

I like the robotic name of this app: Schedule Thing! It’s not science fiction, it’s a scheduling application that makes use of what it calls “resources.” A resource can be just about anything, like a meeting space or a person. List when a given resource is available, and then participants click on the option that works for them. After the initial setup, Schedule Thing can save you a lot of time.

When is Good

I love When is Good because it’s super simple and completely free. When you create an event, you highlight or “paint over” the dates and times that work for you, as they appear on a grid. Save the unique URL to share with the rest of your group, as well as the unique results code. After everyone has participated, return to When is Good, enter your results code, and view compatible times in an easy-to-read grid. Like I said, it’s free and very easy to use.

Services like these aren’t unique to work situations, either. Perhaps you’re looking to schedule a fishing trip, a day in the city, or an afternoon at the lake with friends or family. Accommodate everyone’s busy summer schedule by letting them answer your request for info when they can. It’s convenient and easy.

Eliminating single points of failure

Many years ago, I worked as the IT director for a school here in Massachusetts. It was a multi-faceted job that included maintaining a file server, a backup server, well over 100 machines and, finally, a help desk for about 125 people. I have some amusing stories from those years, as well as an important lesson: never have a single point of failure.

Redundancy was the name of the game in my previous job. For example, our file server was connected to something called an “uninterruptible power source,” or UPS. A UPS provides electricity in the event of a power outage. That way, if a storm knocks power out, I still had time to get to our computers and shut them down properly.

I also ran a backup server that saved its daily and monthly backups to several locations. If one of those backups failed for whatever reason, I could rely on one of the alternates to provide what I needed. What does this have to do with daily life? Plenty.

As Leo Babauta once said on Zen Habits: “I’ve seen people pay $1,000 to hear speakers at a conference and only have one pen to take notes.” If that pen breaks or runs out of ink within the first five minutes, you’re out of luck. The simple act of bringing two or even three pens can eliminate a potential problem.

Consider where there might be a single point of failure in your life right now. I did some brainstorming of my own, and came up with this list:

  1. More than one flashlight. Here in semi-rural Cape Cod, we lose power at the drop of a hat. Keeping three inexpensive flashlights in the closet eliminates some stress.
  2. Car keys. Most new cars are sold with a pair of keys. But that’s not always the case with used cars. If you’ve only got one key, spend the money to get a second.
  3. Charger cables. These things aren’t really built to last longer than a couple of years it seems, yet we don’t replace them until they become a frayed fire hazard. Keep a fresh one in a drawer so you can swap it out with the original before plugging it into the wall becomes an act of pure optimism. Additionally, having multiple charging cables in different locations (such as one at your home, one at your office, one in your briefcase) means that you don’t ever have to worry about forgetting a cable when you need it most.
  4. Important documents, like birth certificates, marriage certificates, social security cards, etc. My practice is to put the originals in a safe deposit box and keep photo copies on hand. If I lose/damage the copy it’s no big deal, and I can always retrieve the original if I need it.

Finally, and you probably saw this coming, I’ll say please make multiple backups of your important digital files. A solution as simple as Dropbox makes it very easy to have files both on your computer and safely on their servers. Additionally, Carbonite and Crashplan will back up your computer in its entirety. (Erin wants you to know she’s a fan of Backblaze.)

Make a list of the single points of failure in your life right now, and see if you can fix them. Someday you might be very glad you did.

Organize your web bookmarks

As a person who writes online for a living, I’m constantly finding articles and other insights I want to read. I don’t, however, always have time to read what I find when I find it. So, I must save those articles and websites for later viewing.

Unfortunately, I’m really bad at it.

I’m a Mac user, and the Mac’s operating system will let you drag web addresses into the “Dock” at the bottom of the screen. The good news is that sites and pages saved this way are a click away once saved. The bad news is that if you’ve saved many (as I have), the result are a row of identical icons. The only way to determine where one is pointing is to mouse over it. It’s a cluttered mess. With this in mind, I went searching for alternatives and found the following.

Instapaper: This solution seems to have been made with me in mind. With a single click, I can save an article, site or page to the Instapaper service, which is accessible via a browser, iPhone, iPad, Android, or Kindle. I can leave notes on the articles I’ve saved and even read them when offline.

Historious: This is a searchable history of web pages you’ve marked. To get started, create an account and then drag the Historious bookmark to your browser bar. Then, when you’re on a site or page you want to read later, simply click the bookmark. When you want to find a page again, go to the Historious website and search for a term that was on that site, and it’ll find it for you.

Pinboard: Pinboard isn’t free at $11/year, but there are no ads and no frills. Just bookmark your favorite addresses and refer to them later. Since it works in a browser, it’s compatible with nearly anything you can throw at it. It will even sync with Instapaper if that’s something you want to use.

Ember: This Mac-only software lets you collect URLs but goes way beyond that. You can take snapshots of a web page, too, and annotate it. Everything you save to Ember can be gathered into collections, making it easy to organize by project, work vs. home, interests, what have you. It’s quite useful.

There you have several options for getting you web bookmarks organized. Now if you’ll excuse me, I have my reading and organizing work cut out for me.

Organize a summer vacation with your smartphone

Last year I traveled to Orlando from Boston and managed every aspect of the trip, from packing to sending a thank-you card, with my iPhone. I rarely touched paper through the planning and traveling process and never felt unprepared or wanting. The following is how I managed a vacation with a smartphone (and you can, too).


There are two pieces of hardware I needed for my journey beyond my smartphone. The first was a backup battery case. My choice was the Mophie Juice Pack. It’s sturdy, indicates its available power via LEDs, and has an on/off switch, so you don’t turn it on until you need it. The Juice Pack leaves all the ports and buttons available on a phone and charges up with or without the smartphone inside. I typically switch it on when my iPhone’s battery hit 20 percent, and turned it off once the phone was back up to 80 percent.

Don’t have an iPhone? No worries, Mophie makes battery cases for many makes and models.

I also brought an AC charger for the car. Nothing devours a smartphone’s battery like running a GPS app, so a charger is essential. Save the Juice Pack for later.

Book a flight

Kayak is my favorite smartphone travel app, available for iPhone and Android devices, and it’s what I used to book my flight. I launched the app, tapped Flights, and entered flight details (like originating airport, terminal airport, date, number of passengers and price range). Then, I tapped Search Flights.

Once I selected my flight, I booked through the app (but you don’t have to). Finally, I had the program email the details to me and a travel partner.

If you book your flight outside of the app, you can create a free Kayak account and email any confirmation emails to your special Kayak address. The details will appear in the “My Trips” section and the app does a stellar job of parsing the information into something useable. Having all your flight information in one, well-organized location is very convenient.

Packing list

I also used Kayak to create a packing list. There are many apps that can do this, but I like having things in one place. Kayak offers four list templates by default: Family, Business, Romantic, and General. Each features items that one might take on a family trip, business trip, etc. You can edit these lists or create custom ones.

Book a bus ticket

I live in the boonies, so I must take a bus to the airport. My local bus line isn’t the most technically advanced, but that’s all right. The schedule is available as a PDF, which I put into Evernote tagged: Florida. Now, I’ve got the schedule ready to browse anytime, even if I lose my Internet connection.

At this point, I had to touch paper. My bus line sells tickets with no electronic option.

Finally, I put copies of email confirmation from the airline and a photo of the bus ticket into my Evernote “Florida” notebook. It’s overkill, but it helps me rest easier. Now it’s off to the airport.

En route

Kayak does a great job of monitoring flight information, but there are alternatives. My favorite is Flight Update Pro. This app lets you create a Trip, and each Trip can have several flights. Flight information is very legible, and includes terminal and gate information, weather report flight maps, and even a seating chart. You can store your confirmation number, seat number, and any relevant notes.

The sharing options are great, too. You can send an email or a SMS to a travel partner with a tap of a button. There’s little to type, as the messages are pre-populated with flight information and status. Kayak offers easy emails, but not SMS. It’s a simple way to say, “I’m here,” with almost no effort.

There are other flight apps, and I’ve tried many. Honorable mention goes to Flight Card by Sylion. It’s less capable than the others, but very good looking and certainly well-suited to those who fly less frequently or aren’t as demanding of their flight apps. Again, if you have an Android device, you can do all of this with Kayak.


After a night at my parents’, it was time to drive to the destination, Universal Studios Islands of Adventure. I’d need a turn-by-turn GPS app for the two-hour drive, and Google Maps is my choice, available for Android and iOS. It’s been my go-to GPS app for years.

Park Map

Many amusement parks have apps for customers and some third-party developers have created them, too. Universal’s Islands Of Adventure – GPS Map with HP is a nice example of the latter. It provides a map of the venue with GPS directions, as well as points of interest such as popular attractions, restaurants, and restrooms. It’s not all-inclusive (many Disney apps include ride wait times, for example), but it is better than those oversized paper maps that typically get torn or lost. If you’re heading to an amusement park this summer, be sure to research park-specific apps that might be beneficial for you.


Smartphones come with photo software that’s fantastic right out of the box, so you probably won’t need to look elsewhere. I do, however, like Camera+ by Tap Tap Tap for the iPhone. Its editing tools are quite nice.

Don’t forget to back up your photographs automatically so if your phone gets waterlogged or lost, you don’t lose your vacation memories.

Thank you notes

There’s a great app for making greeting cards from Android devices and another for iPhones. On your flight home, you can take care of the thank you cards and be finished with your trip except for your laundry when you get home.

Helpful smartphone apps for people with ADD

A few years ago, I was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). In short, I was thrilled; years of frustration were explained and I got a comprehensive plan for the future. Surprisingly, my smartphone is a part of that plan.

One of the reasons my iPhone is part of my comprehensive ADD plan is because it’s always with me and a lot better at remembering what needs to be done and when than I am on my own. Listed below are some of the apps and other practices that I absolutely depend on to help me focus and get things done. Perhaps they’ll help you or someone you know.

Before I begin, please note that any ADD treatment plan is multi-faceted and individualized, and typically involves input from a trained, experienced professional. This post is presented for your information only and not meant as medical advice. With that said, on to the apps.

Due: I have a terrible time remembering to do those little tasks that must be completed every day. I can write a note to myself, yes, but that’s an incomplete solution. How will I remember to read the list? Most of the time, I don’t. Or I lose the note. Fortunately, the answer is simple; have the list present itself to me at the appropriate time.

Due is that list. It’s a reminder app for iPhone and iPad that’s perfect for quick additions and relentless with the reminders. Due is not a calendar, a GTD solution, or a to-do list. It won’t sort items by context or project. What it does is answer the question, “Will you remind be about ____?” with a resounding “Yes.”

By default, Due pings and produces a dialog box at the designated time and every 60 seconds thereafter until I act upon it by either marking it done or putting it off. Due’s persistence won’t let me forget about the task, so I’m likely to either complete it or delay it if necessary. Also, delaying the deadline doesn’t affect the snooze function. Those pesky but immensely helpful reminders are also pushed ahead.

Evernote: Where Due is my short-term memory, Evernote is for long-term storage. Anything that I don’t need to act upon right away, but might need to refer to in the future, goes into Evernote. I get such a huge sense of relief knowing that I have all that information and, more importantly, that I know where to find it.

MindNode Pro: I’ve written about mind mapping before, as it’s my favorite way to brainstorm. When I get started, ideas just show up for me rapidly and without any organization. A mind map suits this tendency well, as I can just capture these thoughts easily and attach them to other relevant thoughts quickly.

These three apps go a long way to keeping me on top of what I need to do and capture the thoughts I have. Most importantly, they give me the peace of mind that I’m not missing something important, which is such an awful feeling (especially when it’s true). If you know of something else I should check out, let me know in the comments below.

Tech to organize each room of the house

As an unclutterer who loves technology, I’m always looking for ways to marry the two. I had this in mind as my wife and I did some light spring cleaning this weekend. Nothing too major, we just made some preparations for the school year’s end like bringing out the beach towels, organizing the shed a bit, and making sure the yard equipment is in good order.

As I moved from room to room, I asked myself, “If I could share one bit of tech from this room with the Unclutterer readers, what would it be?” Behold the answer: one example of useful tech for each room in the house.


There are so many options here I struggled to pick just one, but I landed on the Belkin refrigerator mount for iPad. This device is so easy to install and extremely effective: ours has been in place for years. When affixed at eye level, you get a companion that can help with recipes, run a timer, provide music, stream TV shows, and display a calendar — all without taking up a lick of counter space.

If you have a tablet that isn’t a supported iPad model, consider the Aduro U-Grip Adjustable Universal Fridge/Wall Mount, as it accommodates a variety of tablet makes and models.


You could make an argument that the bedroom should be a sanctuary from the devices that demand our attention all day, like smartphones and laptop computers. I can’t argue with that, because for the most part, I agree.

However, I’ve used my iPhone as an alarm clock for years, and this retro radio-style dock from Areaware has held it beautifully on my nightstand for a long time. It’s more form than function, sure, but it keeps the phone at a readable angle so I needn’t lift up my phone to read the time in the morning. The device also channels my phone’s charging cable toward the wall so I don’t have to see the cable dangling off the edge of my night stand.


The Withings Smart Body Analyzer (SBA) is a very cool tool indeed. When I was a kid, stepping on a scale meant standing stock still as the numbers beneath the needle settled into place. Today, the SBA can track your history and display it via beautiful apps for iOS and Andriod. It also takes your pulse and designs fitness goals for you, based on the data it records.

If that’s not enough, it can store data for multiple users and even share weather information before you leave the house. In short, it replaces a lot of other tools that would otherwise take up room.

Living Room

I feel like “living room” is an outdated concept, but when I was young the term referred to a house’s central gathering place. The room used for socializing and leisure. Since this room is often a house’s entrainment hub there are many uncluttered tech options to consider. My current favorite, though, are media streaming devices.

There are so many to choose from, including the Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Google Chromecast, Roku and more. Each has similarities and differences, but I’m mentioning it here for one reason: they can replace many of the DVDs and VHS tapes you might have hanging around.

Also, since they depend on your home’s WiFi network instead of IR for communication, like your TV’s remote does, you can place them completely out of sight. They’re useful, fun, and huge clutter reducers.


Not technically a room in the house, the closet still deserves attention, as they love to accumulate clutter. For those looking to add a bit of tech to a closet, I suggest an app called Closet+. It’s a database of all your clothes that keeps a record of what you have, but also lets you preview outfits with just a few swipes.

You can enter an item’s cost, the number of times you’ve worn it (which breaks down the “cost per wear” statistic. Love it.), date last worn, and more. You can even create packing lists for when you’re going away on vacation.


Finally, if you’ve got a basement, shed, or other storage area, I’ve previous shared a few ideas for those zones, too.

Google Photos offers convenient storage and search option

Google has offered a new photo management service and set of apps simply named Google Photos. It looks like it could be a good solution for the confounding issue of digital photo management.

I’ve written about my struggles with digital photos several times here on Unclutterer. The ease with which we can take hundreds of photos creates a modern issue: managing mountains of photos. There are several solutions available and now Google is pushing its latest, Google Photos.

Google Photos was once a part of its Google+ service, which has failed to catch on as the company hoped it would. Now free to exist as an independent product, Google Photos is ready for mainstream use if you’re willing to accept a trade-off.

First, it stores all images in the cloud (read: a remote server). Many people are comfortable with cloud-based services in 2015, but people are also protective of their family photos. If it’s any consolation, I store my photos this way. Also, images uploaded to Goole Photos are private by default.

Using a cloud-based storage solution frees up oodles of space on your device (Google Photos supports iPhone, Android, and the Web). Also, you can enjoy unlimited storage … as long as you’re okay with a photo resolution of 16 megapixels and video at 1080p (I am). Otherwise, you have options. You can get 15 GB of Google Drive storage for free, and you can purchase 100 GB for $1.99 per month, or 1 TB a month for $9.99, which isn’t awful.

But it’s not the storage that I find amazing, it’s the search functionality that makes this so cool.

Google is synonymous with searching, so having a strong search function should be no surprise. If you’re looking for a photo of you dog, for instance, you can simply type “dog” into the search field. There’s no need to remember dates or locations. Just “dog” will bring up every image you have of a dog. You can even search for color, like “green,” and Google Photos will bring up your images of grass, leaves, green t-shirts and so on. I’ve been playing with it and it’s impressive. No tagging was involved.

Another cool trick is it will find images that were taken on the same day or at the same location, and group them into “stories” or collages for you. You can opt to browse these once or save them to your camera roll if you want to alter the “stories” it creates.

If you’re someone who finds himself searching for that one photo you have in mind that you took that one time, well Google Photos will likely be able to help you with that. Google Photos isn’t the perfect answer, but it’s a very good one.

Organize your smartphone for summer travel

For people who own smartphones, one of your phone’s benefits is that it can serve as your mobile computer when you’re traveling. To help facilitate this change in purpose, you may also wish to switch things up on your phone. You can make adjustments to the the apps on your home screen, the alerts your smartphone delivers, and more before departing for a trip. The following suggestions are what I recommend making to your smartphone while preparing to travel.

Re-organize applications

Depending on the model of smartphone you have, you likely have a limited number of apps you can store on your phone’s main screen. With this in mind, consider which apps you’ll want to access most often during a trip, and move them to the main screen. You can move all your other apps to subsequent screens, reducing visual clutter and saving yourself from playing “hide and seek” on your phone when your connectivity may not be as consistent as it is at home. I typically have these apps on my home screen during a trip (I have an iPhone):

  • Mail
  • Phone
  • Safari
  • Maps
  • Messages
  • Camera
  • Evernote
  • Kayak
  • Motion-X GPS Drive
  • Path
  • Rdio
  • Any destination-specific apps

Most of these apps have obvious functions: phone calling, web browsing, navigating, texting, listening to music, and shooting photos and video. The others have specific duties.

Evernote is my database for everything digital. It lets me create and browse a fast, lightweight, and searchable repository of all the specifics I’ll need for my trip: hotel reservations, airport details, parking locations, confirmation numbers, and so much more are all a tap away. In fact, my “everything database” has all but eliminated paper from my travel materials.

Motion-X GPS Drive (iOS only) is my preferred turn-by-turn navigation app for the iPhone. It’s reliable, inexpensive, and easy to use. Advanced features, like saved searches and synthetic voices that are genuinely easy to understand, make it a winner. (Erin would like to note that she’s addicted to Waze, which is available for Mac and Windows phones.)

Path is a social networking application with an interesting premise: unlike Facebook and Twitter, which invite users to broadcast their comings and goings to whoever will listen, Path asks you to invite a handful of family and friends to share your favorite moments. I often use it with my family, most of whom also do a fair amount of traveling.

Finally, I’ll add any destination-specific apps I find. For instance, there are several great apps available for navigating Walt Disney World. In 2011, Macy’s released an official Thanksgiving Day Parade app. Search your favorite App Store for apps related to your destination.

ID your equipment for instant recognition

Not every trip is a vacation. I often travel for work and when I do, my smartphone is in tow, as is a pile of other tech goodies, like wall chargers, cables, keyboards and so on. What’s more, I meet colleagues who also travel with gadgets, often identical to my own. To avoid confusion, I mark my own stuff for easy organizing.

The easiest and least permanent way to label cables and equipment is with a small sticker. I prefer the colorful circles people often use in retail to identify sale items, etc. You’ll find them at most big-box office supply stores. I’ll put a red circle, for instance, on all of my chargers, cables, iPhone and iPad case, keyboards, and so on. That way if there’s a question about who owns what, I can ask, “Is there a red sticker?”

Stickers are impermanent, too, and I like that. Someday I might want to sell or give away some of my gear and no one will want it if it’s got “Dave Caolo” written on it in black permanent marker. The stickers are easy to remove and don’t leave any residue.

While stickers work, they’re not always the most elegant solution. For something a little better-looking, consider Buoy Tags (or similar). These customizable plastic tags clip onto USB cables. You can add your own initials, name, phone number, etc. Tags like this are very handy.

Disable alerts

I’ll admit, I check email during trips with my family. However, I reduce the temptation to spend too much time on this app by making it less attractive. First, I disable the alert sound/vibration completely. Next, I disable the alert icon that appears whenever there is a new message. And finally, I move the app into a folder so it is more difficult to access and see. When I get on my phone to pull up a hotel reservation, I’m not lured into email–on, off, and back to my relaxing trip.

Reconciling paper and digital productivity and organizing tools

I’m a confirmed gadget nut, and therefore many of my preferred tools for productivity and organization are electronic, including hardware and software. Yet, I still keep and use a paper notebook almost every day because I love my paper calendar and notebooks. This can be hard to reconcile. I am continually asking myself questions, such as: Why am I writing things down twice? And, um, where did I do that recent brainstorming session, on my notebook or computer?

Keeping on top of my projects is important, so I’ve begun to formally address the incongruence between my paper and digital tools.

The system I’ve discovered to solve my dilemma was inspired by a recent episode of The Fizzle Show. The Fizzle Show is the podcast of the website, which offers insight and advice for those working on building a business. Episode 99 featured insights from Mike Vardy and Shawn Blanc, two self-starters whom I admire. It was in listening to their conversation that I came upon a system.

Shawn and Mike discussed the practice of keeping a “productivity journal.” They use it to formally write down progress the’ve made on goals, both little and small. It’s a nice bit of motivation, reinforcement, and history. At the end of a week, month, or year, they can look back at what they accomplished and what was left incomplete. Right away, I wanted to adopt the practice. But how?

I love writing in a notebook. It’s just fun, and I do it every day. Yet, as I mentioned earlier, it’s much easier to find entries via electronic search. I’m a big fan of Evernote, which acts as my digital “cold storage.” Fortunately, there’s an easy way to marry the two that doesn’t take a lot of time or require me to write and type the same information.

Enter the Evernote Moleskine. It’s a Moleskine notebook that comes with some Evernote branding and, more importantly, an Evernote Premium subscription. Finally, the Evernote Mobile apps are tuned to recognize a page from the notebook and snap a crystal-clear, searchable image. Now, when I complete my entry in the notebook, I snap a photo of it with the Evernote app, give it an appropriate name and tags, and I’m good. The program recognizes my handwriting and makes it searchable. I had the pleasure of writing in a notebook and I’ve got a searchable, indexed copy in a digital app that I trust and is nearly ubiquitous.

I’ve tried to abandon my notebooks, but I just love them and feel motivated to work when I sit down with a nice, fresh page and a pen. This system of reconciling paper and electronic isn’t perfect — it would be easier to pick just one — but, honestly, it’s working fine and the time it takes to photograph and name an entry digitally is minimal. If you’re like me, straddling the analog and digital worlds, this solution might also work for you.

Storing the CPAP machine (and other ugly but frequently used stuff)

We recently asked our readers to share their biggest uncluttering and organizing hurdles and they responded. Now, we’re going through the comments to see what we can do to help.

Unclutterer reader Mary asked:

C-Pap Machines for sleep apnea … used every nite … sitting on a small table by my husband’s side of the bed and most visible from adjoining living room … long hose and face piece at end of hose … so ugly but so necessary … storage ideas but still convenient?

Mary, there are a number of approaches you might use to address this challenge. While I’m going to list some specific solutions for CPAP machines, the strategies I’ve included could apply to any ugly-but-useful items we need to keep close at hand.

Make the equipment less ugly

Your options here will depend on what CPAP machine you use and how crafty you are. There are some commercial products, but you could also try a do-it-yourself approach. On the commercial side:

The ResMed S9 Autoset comes in pink, which some people think looks less clinical (and therefore more attractive) than the basic machine.

If you use a ResMed S9 device you can also get a skin (a vinyl decal) for it. Skinit has a program where you provide the image and the company turns it into a custom skin.

You can also find a few Skinit ready-made skins (products the company has discontinued) on eBay and other sites.

Cover it up

Building off the idea of the teapot cover called a cozy, some people have created CPAP machine and mask cozies. I’m not finding anyone who sells a CPAP cozy commercially, but you could either make one yourself or have one made for you.

You can buy hose covers, which serve a functional purpose. But a cover also “makes the CPAP look less clinical,” as one Amazon buyer noted.

Place it somewhere handy but less conspicuous

The CPAP machine doesn’t have to live on top of the nightstand in order to be handy. The Bedside CPAP Table keeps the CPAP close by the bed but off the nightstand, freeing up that nightstand space for other things. (This table is also useful for travel to places where there might not be a nightstand next to the bed.)

You can also take the CPAP machine (and the hoses and mask) off the nightstand by putting everything into the nightstand. Perdue Woodworks makes a nightstand specifically for this purpose, but if you’ve got another nightstand where you’re willing to cut holes in the sides, you might be able to create your own.

Denny Allen Cabinets has a different design, with a side-opening drawer, which could also work well.

When you’re dealing with anything that’s unsightly yet useful, you may find a similar creative way to disguise or hide the item.