More kitchen tips

Here are a few kitchen tips from an article in The Telegraph in 2007:

  • Uncluttering tips: A time study revealed that most people use the same four pots and pans over and over again. Take an objective look at the other seldom used items. Consider eliminating them or storing them elsewhere.
  • Recipes: A three-ring binder with magnetic photo pages can be used to store recipes collected from family and friends, magazines, newspapers, and the internet. Avoid those that require ingredients you will never buy. If your family doesn’t find a recipe to be a hit, then toss it out. Discard unused recipes yearly. It takes only minutes to do this. Consider displaying special cookbooks on your bookshelf or coffee table as a conversation piece.
  • Paper and mail: It’s best to open mail right beside a recycling bin or trashcan. Don’t put it in a pile to “sort later.” This delay tactic only wastes time, as you’ll have to review the mail a second time. It takes seconds to pitch junk mail and unwanted advertisements now. If you can’t get your magazines read, do not renew your subscription, instead use the library, or pick up an occasional copy at the grocery store.

This post has been updated since its original publication in 2007.

What’s a kitchen for?

Today’s kitchens are used for more than just preparing food. They are often playrooms, offices, mail centers, and TV rooms. When you mix up so many purposes for the same space (or even the same countertop), you’re not going to get good results. Something as simple as making a ham and cheese sandwich is impossible when your countertops are covered with bills and other papers. Instead of succumbing to this fate, set up different spaces for different tasks.

Ideally, your kitchen should only be for cooking, but realistically that’s not going to be the case–especially since kitchens tend to be the center of family activity. Designate some countertop space that’s off-limits to anything but cooking or eating, and make it a point to keep it clear when it’s not being used. That way, when you’re ready to use it again, it’s ready for you.

If you must bring mail and bill-paying paraphernalia into the kitchen, set up a space for just that activity and don’t let it spread out of that area. (A desktop organizer or mini-shelf is a perfect solution.) Even if you can’t dedicate surfaces to specific activities like bill-paying, storage in the kitchen can help. For example, when you finish eating at the kitchen table, you take away the dishes to wash and store in the cupboard. Why not do the same with everything else? If you pay bills, do homework, or play games at the kitchen table, make sure to clean up when you’re done. Keeping a drawer or cupboard for each activity will make it as easy and second-nature to put away your stuff.

 

This post has been updated since its original publication in 2007.

How to organize holiday gift bags

Holiday gift bags are more popular now then when I was young, and unlike wrapping paper, they’re reusable. This year we received quite a few of them and I’ve been thinking about good ways to store them. Here are a few ways to store holiday gift bags to keep them in good condition for reuse.

Magazine holders are my favorite method of organizing gift bags. You can get about two dozen bags into a single magazine holder, and the write-on label makes it easy to categorize and retrieve the one you want.

You can also use a large, handled gift bag and put the smaller gift bags inside. Once folded, sort them by size or occasion. The larger bag becomes a sort of mobile filing cabinet that you can pull out at the next gift-giving occasion. It’s easy to store, simply hang it on a hook in a closet.

An expandable accordion-style file folder is another great method, provided that your bags are relatively small. Don’t expect larger bags to fit without protruding from the top of the folder.

A hanging organizer might be useful. However if hung on a door, it may prevent it from opening all the way or bang against the door whenever it’s opened or closed. It would be great if hung on a rod in a closet though.

If the bags are not suitable for re-use, you can cut them into gift tags, use them for arts-and-crafts projects, donate them to an elementary school teacher, after-school club, or toss them into the recycling bin. In any case, have fun organizing — or saying goodbye — your holiday gift bags.

What to do with holiday cards? Recycle!

Two of our readers provided creative suggestions for how to recycle holiday cards in the comments section of our Holiday gifts: Out with the old in with the new post. Not wanting to have them lost in the shuffle, I wanted to pull them out to everyone’s attention.

From Jan:

I recycle my Christmas cards. They arrive in the mail, I read them, I cut the writing off the back, I turn them into a Christmas post card with a friend’s address, stamp and short message and repost immediately.

From Kate:

Once the holidays are over, I “massacre” [cards] into gift tags for next year using a pair of pinking shears.

For even more great ideas, check out the comments below and our other post on uncluttering holiday greeting cards.

 

This post has been updated since its original publication in 2007.

Organizing gift wrapping supplies

Tubes of gift wrap are cumbersome and always find a way to cause a mess. If you don’t already have a designated storage system for your gift wrap, then you may want to consider putting one together or purchasing a pre-made system.

I use the Gift Wrap Organizer (pictured), which has served me well over the years. I hang it in my office closet and only pull it out when I use it. I purchased tape and scissors specifically to be stored with the gift wrap so that everything is in one spot when I need it.

I keep five tubes of wrapping paper in the storage sleeves: One roll of heavy, plain white (for wedding and anniversary gifts), two rolls of holiday paper (one with a snowman print and the other a solid gold), a conservative stripe (for father’s day and male birthdays), and a neutral with polka dots (for mother’s day, female birthdays, and baby showers). If I had children, I would probably have a sixth tube of printed, youthful paper. In the front pockets I have stored bows, ribbons, and clear scotch tape. The side pocket holds a pair of scissors. The top back pocket holds white, cream, pink, and blue tissue paper. Finally, the bottom back pocket holds 10 gift bags in varying sizes (most of these are recycled from gifts people gave to me).

I found other pre-made systems that would work well, too:

Keep gift wrap from causing a mess in your home with a self-made or purchased organization system specifically designed for this purpose.

 

This post has been updated since its original publication in October 2007.

The case for keeping (some) documents

A few weeks ago, we wrote about retention schedules, a list of the documents you have and how long to keep them.

Recently, I was required to complete a background check/security screening for an upcoming contract job. Not only did I have to provide a list of addresses covering the previous five years, I had to provide proof that I actually lived there. Examples of proof could be a lease/rental agreement stating that I was an occupant, or a utility bill or bank statement with my name and address on it for each year I claimed I lived at that address.

Fortunately, I have records dating back five previous years as the Canada Revenue Agency requires that income tax documents (which state my name and address) be kept for six years. However, many people, including young adults, may not have these documents available.

If you’re a young person just starting out on your own, make sure you have a rental contract/lease or at least one bill with your own name on it coming to the address at which you live (not your parents’ home which would be considered a mailing address while you were away at school). Your college/university should be able to give you a copy of a contract if you’re living in a residence/dorm that states your room assignment. If you are sharing off-campus accommodations with a roommate make sure both of your names are on the lease/rental agreement, or that your name is on one of the utility bills.

You could create a file (paper and/or electronic) containing these documents along with a spreadsheet listing your previous addresses. Keep a copy of these documents for at least five years, or at least 10 years if you are considering employment in an industry requiring “TOP SECRET” security clearance.

Having all of these documents handy will make the job application process much faster and easier and you’ll look like a prepared professional when you’re able to submit all the required documentation almost immediately.

RIM: Part seven, records maintenance

We’ve worked for a few weeks now on building a functional and practical records management system. However, it won’t stay that way for long if we neglect routine maintenance. For those comparing our records and information management system to the S.P.A.C.E. model of organizing, we’re now working on our equalization step.

Daily or weekly maintenance

I prefer to spend 5 minutes at the end of every day (usually right after supper) and do the following:

  • Clear receipts from my wallet and file them in the inbox for reconciliation with bank statement.
  • Check other locations in the house (e.g., mailbox, spouse’s purse/wallet) for receipts and documents and place them in the inbox.
  • Move receipts from my email inbox to the receipts folder on my hard drive and file the email.
  • Move any files from my downloads folder and desktop and place them in the appropriate electronic filing cabinet folders.

We have a busy household so it is more effective if I perform these tasks daily. Some people may find it easier to perform these tasks on a weekly basis. In my experience, leaving these tasks for longer than a week may result in lost receipts and generally makes maintenance tasks more time-consuming than necessary.

Monthly maintenance

Your inbox should be completely cleared monthly. It doesn’t matter what day in the month you choose to do your maintenance. If all your bills are paid by the 13th of the month, then you could choose that day. You could also choose the last Sunday of the month — whatever works best for your schedule. Monthly maintenance should usually take no more than 30 minutes as you can rely on your retention schedule to indicate where records should be filed and how long they should be kept.

  • Reconcile your bank statement and dispose of any receipts (paper and electronic) no longer required.
  • Scan paper receipts for high-value items or items that you’re keeping long-term, especially those printed on thermal paper as they are subject to fading over time. Move scanned receipts and any similar electronic receipts to your Guarantees and Instructions folder for long-term storage.
  • Check your retention schedule and dispose of any records (paper and electronic) you no longer need or any that you can move to your inactive folders.
  • Check your electronic file names and ensure you’re adhering to the file naming system you set out (typos are possible!)

Annual maintenance

Annual maintenance can be done at any time during the year. January 1st is a popular time because it is the beginning of the new year but may not work for some people because of the holiday season. March/April might be a good time for annual maintenance as it is around the same time as you would file your income taxes and you are probably working through your files anyway.

Whatever time of year you choose, I suggest scheduling about four to six hours for annual maintenance. You could do it all at once or spread the work over several days. Here are some things that should be done during your annual maintenance.

  • Evaluate your system. Is there is anything you’d like to adjust? Would you prefer to have all your insurance documents in one file, or would you prefer to have them split so auto insurance is filed with your other automobile documents, and house insurance is filed with other house documents? The annual maintenance period is the best time to make those changes.
  • Review your retention schedule. Using your citations, ensure there have been no changes to retention times for your records. If there have been changes, update your retention schedule and save it with a new file name rather than over-writing the old file. This way, you’ll be able to look back and see the previous rules you had for document retention. (This could be important if you are ever audited.) Remember to update the location of documents if you’ve made changes.
  • Check each company or agency you deal with (bank, credit card, electric, phone, etc.) and ensure copies of all statements, bills, receipts and slips have been downloaded or received. Make arrangements to get copies if you don’t have them.
  • Review email folders and ensure all receipts are transferred to the appropriate folders on your hard drive.
  • Transfer all receipts you can claim on your income taxes (tuition receipts, charitable donations, etc.) to the current year’s Income Tax Note any items that you may be missing and follow up with the agency to make sure you get the documents you need to file your taxes.
  • Move receipts from important purchases (e.g., high value items and those still under warranty), from the current year’s receipts folder to the Guarantees and Instructions Scan receipts if you haven’t already done so during your monthly maintenance. Retain these receipts as this shows proof of ownership should you require repairs to the items or if they are lost due to fire or theft.
  • Review items in your Guarantees and Instructions folder and dispose of any receipts and instruction booklets for items you no longer own.

Once your annual maintenance is complete, move your inactive paper records to storage to clear a space for your new, incoming active records. On your computer, create a new “filing cabinet” folder with all of the same sub-folders for your new, incoming electronic records.

With your annual maintenance complete, you’ll be ready to start a new year of records management with ease.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our series on records and information management. Feel free to participate in our Information Management Forum and share your challenges and successes.

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RIM: Part six, building a filing system

We’ve spent the past few weeks determining which records we have and how long we need to keep them. We’ve eliminated records we don’t need and scanned those we want to convert to electronic format. Now we’re ready to file what is left.

Unclutterer Jeri wrote a great article about creating a personalized filing system. She asks some great questions about where you want to keep your files, as well as what types and colours of file folders you prefer.

Over the past few weeks, we’ve talked about active and inactive records. I suggest you keep your active files close to where you need to process your paperwork. For example, you might get charitable donation receipts you can claim on your income taxes throughout the year. Your “current year” income tax file should be handy so you can place the receipts in the folder easily. Once you’ve filed your income tax, you still need to keep the receipts but you no longer need to process them so you can place the entire folder in another location — perhaps in a filing box in your attic.

Filing paper records

Your filing system should be easy to use. Jeri wrote some great advice for making filing easier. Unclutterer Dave has put together a list of criteria for buying a filing cabinet and Jeri provides even more advice and includes alternatives to the traditional filing cabinet.

For those of you that may not have space for a typical filing cabinet, Erin answered a reader’s question about filing cabinets that can double as end-tables or ottomans. A seagrass filing box is also an alternative for people who may be willing to sacrifice some sturdiness for appearance. For those of you who need something rugged and transportable, I suggest these plastic filing boxes. They are expensive but we’ve had ours for over 15 years. They’re water and insect resistant and they’ve endured six military moves (two of which have been overseas) and they still look and function as good as new.

Filing electronic records

I always suggest that people create a folder structure on their computer similar to their paper filing cabinet. Such as the one shown below.

The default listing of folders is alphabetical order. If this doesn’t work for you, adjust the names of the folders. For example, you could use the names Finance-Banking and Finance-Investment to list these two similar categories together. Some people might choose to create another folder called Finance and put both Banking and Investment as sub-folders. This is an adequate alternative however, too many sub-folders may make it difficult to find files or result in the same file being stored in multiple places. It’s best to keep the folder structure as simple as possible.

Vital Records

You may wish to store your vital records and other hard to replace documents in a fireproof and waterproof box in your home to protect them in case of disaster. Although heavy, this box would be easy enough to transport if you had to quickly evacuate your home. Some people prefer to keep their vital records in a safety deposit box at a bank or other financial institution. This is a good alternative as well.

Having an electronic copy of your hard to replace documents is a good idea. If your documents are ever lost, stolen, or damaged, you’ll have a copy of the original information (registration numbers, certificate numbers, etc.) and authorities can better assist you. From time to time you may be required to submit a copy of your passport or other ID to confirm your identity to authorities. Having an electronic copy will save you from digging out the original — especially important if you have to drive all the way to your bank.

NOTE: The electronic copies of vital records need to be kept secure as they are as valuable as the originals to identity thieves. Use encrypted cloud storage and password protect files and folders to keep these copies safe.

For those of you who are comparing our records management program to the S.P.A.C.E. model of organizing, we have just completed our “containerizing” step. Congratulations! You now have an organized and functional records management system. Next week is our final installment, how to maintain our system so it runs smoothly.

 

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RIM: Part five, scanning paper records

Now that we’ve eliminated all of the records we no longer need, it’s time to organize the records we are keeping. Many people have a desire to go paperless and convert their paper records to electronic records. This is commonly called “imaging.” Here are some things to consider.

Is it worth imaging?

If you’re going to be shredding the paper within the next year, it may not be worth your time to scan it. The tax returns you are required to keep (but never actually look at again) may be able to sit quietly in a box until they are ready to be shredded. Focus on getting year’s documents imaged first, then work backwards in time if required.

Many user manuals for appliances and electronics are probably already in digital format. Don’t waste your time scanning them. Search for them online and download them. You can scan the receipt of purchase and keep that with the digital copy of your user manual.

Is imaging permissible?

Some governments and agencies will not accept imaged paper documents as “official records.” Most vital records and some other important documents (e.g., birth certificates, marriage licences, will, and investment certificates) are issued on paper and must remain on paper. Confirm with the agency or your legal/financial advisors if imaged documents meet the requirements of official records. The Government of Canada and the U.S. Internal Revenue Service have published guidelines on document imaging.

NOTE: You are welcome to use these imaging guidelines to store electronic copies of vital records and important documents but please do not destroy the originals!

File format

Files scanned for document preservation are typically stored as Tagged Image File Format (.tif) or Portable Document File (.pdf), both of which are lossless. Lossless means that every single bit of data that was originally in the file remains after the file is compressed and uncompressed. This is generally the technique of choice for text or spreadsheet files, where losing words or financial data could pose a problem. Lossy file formats (e.g., jpg) throw away the smallest pixels every time the file is re-saved. If you re-save too many times, the image would eventually disappear.

Scanning resolution

It is important to scan your documents at the proper resolution so that they are legible when viewed on the screen and when printed. The acronyms PPI and DPI are often used interchangeably however they are different. PPI means pixels per inch and measures resolution on the screen whereas DPI means dots per inch and measures resolution on print. The higher the DPI when an image is scanned, the higher quality it will be both on screen and in print.

Generally, office documents are usually scanned at 200-300 DPI. A higher resolution may be required if there is fine, small text or unclear penmanship (e.g., faint handwritten signature). Scanning in black & white produces smaller files and may be adequate for most plain text documents or line diagrams. Colour or greyscale scanning captures more detail but creates larger files.

You should scan a few sample documents and then print them out (what you see on the screen is not necessarily what you get when you print) to ensure that the re-produced image is identical to the original. Remember, your electronic records should be able to support you in the event of an audit or during any legal proceedings. This may mean scanning blank pages. For example, if your document has four pages, but there is only important data on three of those four pages, you must scan all four pages or your imaged document will be incomplete.

Your sample documents will also give you an idea of the size of files being produced and how much storage space you’ll need on your computer and in your backup locations.

Searchable scanned documents

If you need to be able to search for text within your imaged documents, you’ll need to perform OCR (optical character recognition) during the scanning process. OCR software is often included with scanner software and converts tiff/pdf files to machine-readable text. The success of the OCR process is dependent upon the quality of the scanned image. It works best with type-written text documents. It probably won’t work well with handwritten documents. Performing OCR during the scanning process may slow down the scanning speed but being able to search with your documents may be more important.

Naming your files

Decide on a naming convention — a system used to name your scanned files. As some computer systems have problems with the use of spaces in file names, use an underscore or dash instead (file_name.pdf). It is helpful to use dates in the YYYY-MM-DD format as files will be listed chronologically in the folder. An example would be 2017-04_electric_bill.pdf. You only need to use the DAY if you have more than one document per month (e.g., 1944-12-04_Grandpa_war_letter.pdf and 1944-12-21_Grandpa_war_letter.pdf). Whatever you decide, keep your system consistent.

Backing up your documents

Paperless expert Brooks Duncan, recommends the 3,2,1 rule. You’ll need to have at least three copies of your data, your original PDFs (most likely stored on your home computer) and two backups. You’ll need to keep these backups on two different media (for example, CDs and an external hard drive) and store one backup off-site in a safe location such as a safety deposit box. Take the time to plan your digital storage options before you start imaging.

Scanners

There are many different types of scanners that can do the job. Which type and brand you buy should be based on the type and amount of scanning you need to do, whether or not you need searchable documents and of course, your budget. Here are the basic types of scanners, the advantages and disadvantages of each one, and an example of each type.

Mobile scanner

  • Advantages: These are ideal for people on the go needing to scan receipts, papers, and business cards. Most models will create searchable PDFs. Some models have duplex scanning that allow both sides of a page to be scanned at once. They are USB powered so there is no need to use an electrical outlet.
  • Disadvantage: They scan rather slowly compared to desktop scanners and only scan one page at a time. They may not be suitable for delicate papers and won’t scan things like books. Some models won’t scan photos.
  • Example: Epson WorkForce DS-30 Portable Document & Image Scanner

Document scanner

  • Advantage: These allow for fast, double sided scanning and you can feed many documents different sizes at once. They can create searchable pdfs. They are rather small and can be easily moved and do not take up much desk space.
  • Disadvantage: They may not be suitable for delicate papers and won’t scan things like books.
  • Example: Fujitsu iX500 ScanSnap Document Scanner

Flatbed scanner with document feeder

  • Advantage: The document feeder allows lots of documents of different sizes to be scanned quickly. Some models may do double-sided scanning. They can create searchable pdfs. Having a flatbed allows for scanning of books, oversized and delicate papers.
  • Disadvantage: Because they are rather large, they are not easy to move around and take up quite a bit of desk space. The scanning speeds are usually slower than plain document scanners.
  • Example: HP OfficeJet Pro 8720 Wireless All-in-One Scanner Printer

In our household, we have two scanners. For business trips and when we move house (we’re a military family so we move frequently), the mobile scanner has been extremely useful. It takes up very little space in our baggage and allows us to scan receipts and documents in our hotel room. It’s great to have an instant electronic copy in case the original receipt is lost or damaged. We also have a flatbed scanner with document feeder we use at home. Being able to scan delicate photos and documents as well as the odd page of a book on the flatbed has been very helpful and using the document feeder allows piles of paper to be scanned quickly.

Eliminating the paper records

Once you are sure you have adequately imaged all your documents, return to your original retention schedule and note which paper records you have imaged and on which date. Indicate that the imaged documents are now your only record. Prepare to destroy the paper records.

Our next RIM post will be on how and where to store all of your papers and your digital documents. In the meantime, happy imaging!

 

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The power of the plastic inbox

I receive a lot of paper at work. You would think that by 2017 the fantasy of the “paperless office” would have become a reality. While many businesses have reduced their paper consumption, it hasn’t disappeared. I recently tackled the problem at work with a tried-and-true solution: plastic trays (similar to these).

After some rummaging around in the depths of the office supply closet, I found to dusty, unwanted, plastic trays. I cleaned them off and made two labels: “IN” and “OUT”. Triumphant, I put them on my desk. I’ll admit that I felt like an out-of-date 1950’s business man — or at least TV’s depiction of such a creature.

The following morning I told my staff, “Anything you have for me that requires some action — a signature, editing, filing, anything at all — put into my new inbox. You’ll find it on my desk.” Although they scoffed at Grandpa Dave’s request, it’s been a huge success. I’ve realized the following benefits of the good old-fashioned inbox:

  1. Everything that needs my attention is once place. There’s no more searching around for who’s got that paper I need.
  2. Stress levels work are greatly reduced because when you trust your system, your brain stops perseverating, and you can get on with work.
  3. Going through the inbox at the end of the day, when things are quiet and wrapping up, is actually pleasant.
  4. My staff and other colleagues appreciate having a clearly-defined drop point for items that need my attention.
  5. I have more space on my desk to do actual work! No more mini-stacks of paper here and there.
  6. Boy, it sure feels good when that box is empty.

The secret here is to put everything in the inbox. The receipt in your wallet? Inbox. The notes from that meeting? Inbox. The packing slip from this morning’s delivery? Inbox. You can process all of this stuff (decide that it is, what action needs to be taken, and then act accordingly) when time allows.

It’s such a simple, inexpensive thing. Give it a try at work, home, or where ever you collect and process “stuff.” Let your co-workers, family members, or housemates know, too. You’ll be very glad you did.

The minimalist teacher: improve learning while reducing paper

In a recent interview with teachers about organizing the school year, one of the key organizing challenges was that teachers hold onto too much. It’s a challenge for anyone who works with paper, not just teachers, However, teachers have a harder time, as they are provided with so many paper-based resources for the classroom.

Today’s article is perhaps a bit more academic (pardon the pun!) than is usual here on Unclutterer, but if anyone who imparts knowledge (from teachers to coaches, from health professionals to parents) really wants to help others learn and understand, we need to strip away all the books, papers, and government-mandated programs and focus on the learning itself.

In the English language teaching world, more than a decade ago, teachers took up the challenge of being minimalist, of removing the temptation of focusing on the materials, paring down the classroom to the basics, to developing understanding, and to letting the students guide the content.

This teaching movement, called DOGME (based on the stripped-down filmmaking movement from the 1990s) focuses on ten basic principles.

  1. Interactivity: learning happens from conversation, not one-directional speeches
  2. Engagement: people learn better when they are interested in the topics
  3. Dialogic processes: as Plato told us centuries ago, dialogue helps create understanding
  4. Scaffolded conversations: to go from ignorance to knowledge, building blocks are needed to give people confidence
  5. Emergence: understanding develops from within; it’s not transferred
  6. Components: teachers help learners discover meaning on their own through guiding them through the components of a concept
  7. Voice: students need to feel comfortable and safe communicating
  8. Empowerment: knowledge arises from the ability to express oneself, not necessarily from the ability to read or view materials
  9. Relevance: print or audiovisual materials are only offered as support, not as the centerpiece of learning
  10. Critical use: knowledge is cultural and true learning requires an awareness of our biases (personal, cultural, etc…)

As a minimalist, I love these concepts, not just for teaching, but for all areas of life. In short, learning and understanding come from conversation with others, from an awareness of self and of context, and most importantly from extrapolating personal experiences to new understanding.

I would like to issue a challenge to anyone involved in teaching, not just teachers, but anyone who transfers knowledge:

  • How can you adapt your teaching so that the focus is on the learners and on helping those learners discover for themselves a deeper understanding of the topic you’re teaching?

RIM: Part four, disposition of paper and electronic records

We’ve done a lot of work so far looking at recordkeeping principles, preparing an inventory of our files, and building a retention schedule. Now comes the fun part — eliminating all of the records no longer needed. Here are the steps you can follow to prepare for disposition.

  1. On your retention schedule, take a yellow highlighter and highlight everything that can be shredded (paper) or deleted (electronic).
  2. Designate an area in your home to put paper files to be deleted. For electronic documents, create a folder on your hard drive or use an external hard drive to store documents to be deleted. Do not use your computer trash/recycle bin just yet. It’s easier to compile everything to be deleted in one place and then decide how best to get rid of it.
  3. This step is tedious but necessary. We need to go through each folder, page by page and we need to look “inside” each electronic document. For those of you who are comparing records management to the S.P.A.C.E. model of organizing, this step is akin to looking through your pockets before donating clothing.
    • For paper files, you know that you’re eliminating all paper electric bills from 2007-2009 so you do not have to read each page, merely confirm that the piece of paper is an electric bill from 2007-2009. However, you never know if an important document such as a birth certificate is accidentally stuck between some of the papers. Using a rubber fingertip cover, will speed along the process of going through pages. Place the pages to be shredded in designated disposal area.
    • For electronic records, you do not necessarily need to open each file. You can look through most of them using the preview pane on your PC or Quick Look on your Mac. Once you’ve confirmed that the file should be deleted, move it to the designated “to be deleted” folder.

Destroying Paper Records

Examine the amount of paper you need to dispose of. Home-use shredders are a great option if you are able to do a bit at a time or you don’t have much to shred. However, most home shredders take only 5-10 pages at a time and only run continuously for about five minutes before they overheat so if you have boxes and boxes of paper to be destroyed, consider using a document destruction company such as Iron Mountain or Shred-It. These companies have drop-off points in many cities and you may be able to schedule a pick-up at your location. Whatever document destruction company you choose, ensure they meet NAID (National Association for Information Destruction) standards.

Destroying Electronic Records

If the electronic records you wish to dispose of are on your main hard drive, simply deleting them is fine. Eventually, that portion of your hard drive will be over-written with other data. If you chose to place those electronic records in a partition or on a separate hard drive, you need to securely delete the files so they cannot be retrieved again. To do this, here are some tips for Windows users and here are some tips for Mac users. If you’re not comfortable managing this yourself, some document destruction companies offer a secure hard drive destruction service.

One last step

Take the highlighted retention schedule you prepared in Step 1. For each record series highlighted, write the either “DELETED” or “SHREDDED” and the date beside the name. This serves as a reminder of what documents you destroyed and when you destroyed them. If you’re using a paper retention schedule, keep this document with the other records you wish to keep. If you’re using an electronic version, add a column to your spreadsheet with the destruction date. Save it in a non-editable format (e.g., pdf) with the other records you wish to keep.

Congratulations! You’ve successfully purged all of the records you no longer need! Next week, we’ll take a look at organizing the records that you need to keep.

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