What to throw out around the house

One of the reasons clutter accumulates is our unwillingness to throw things away — or difficulty identifying what should stay and what should go. To get you started, here’s a quick list that you can use in almost any room of the house or even at work.

First, find things that no longer work. This would likely include pens, batteries, remote controls, paperclips that are bent out of shape, or that items that have been in the “someday repair” pile for weeks or months. Gather them up and toss/recycle as necessary.

You can also dispose of anything that has expired. In the kitchen you might find expired condiments, cereal, crackers, etc. Check out StillTasty.com to learn more about how long food items last. Plastic storage containers with no lids (I promise, you’ll never find the lids) should get recycled as well. Plastic cutlery can go too unless you eat on the go regularly.

There are plenty of toss-able items in the closet, too. Mismatched socks are prime examples. You might find the missing mates, so put a small container in the closet and use it to collect the stray socks. If their partners don’t show up within a month, say goodbye to those orphaned socks.

The accessories you never wear can be donated. Shoes that no longer fit can be donated here.

Elsewhere around the house, you can safely get rid of:

  1. Takeout menus if you have not ordered from that restaurant within the past month.
  2. Old prescriptions and medications. See our post on how to dispose of these items here.
  3. Old cosmetics including sunblock as its effectiveness decreases over time.
  4. Old magazines and newspapers. See our tips on how to effectively do that here.

Have fun getting rid of this unnecessary clutter.

How to properly store books

Last weekend I donated several books to the local collection box. Most were titles I had lost interest in, and a few were duplicates (don’t ask how I got multiple copies of one book). When I came home I researched how to properly store the books, as I want the keepers to stay in good shape. Here’s what I found.

When it comes to storing and preserving books, the two biggest enemies are humidity and pests. Moisture in the air encourages mold growth and that will damage books terribly. Additionally, don’t wrap books in plastic or store them in zipper seal plastic bags, as that also encourages mold growth.

Books do best in a controlled climate. Areas where temperate and humidity fluctuate — like an attic, basement, or garage — will lead to damaged books. Places that are too humid can encourage mold growth, while a location that is too dry can make books brittle. Direct sunlight can fade the colors on covers and dust jackets.

It is best to store books in the main living quarters of your house, where the temperate and humidity are relatively constant. Storing books upright on an open bookshelf makes them easily accessible but if books lean against each other or the sides of the bookshelf or are jam-packed on the shelves, the spines can become misaligned. Ensure you clean the books regularly. Attach a soft brush to your vacuum cleaner and set it to low suction to keep the books dust free.

If you don’t have shelf space available, acid-free, lignin-free storage boxes are a viable option. Try to use small to medium in size ones so they won’t be too heavy. Never use boxes that previously stored food, as food odors can attract pests. Pack books flat in the box with the biggest books at the bottom. If you pack books vertically, always have the spine facing downwards to avoid stress on the binding. Fill any empty spaces with acid-free, lignin-free paper to keep the books from bumping into each other and possibly causing damage. For detailed information on book storage and preservation, see the Library of Congress website.

I have this fantasy that, someday after I’m gone, my children will inherit my “library,” as humble as it is. When I was young, my grandfather converted one side of a hallway into a floor-to-ceiling bookshelf that I found fascinating. When he left us a few years ago, I took a few of the books I had always admired to be my own. I like to think that someday, my children (or grandchildren) will bring my old books into their homes. I mean to keep them in good condition until then.

Hidden benefits of uncluttering

Here at Unclutterer we espouse the clutter-free lifestyle. The reasons are mostly obvious: a clean, tidy home means less time is spent searching for things, knowing what you actually own, etc.

In this post, I want to look at the less obvious benefits of uncluttering. These less obvious advantages are just as powerful as those listed above. Let’s get started with time. Time, not money, is the only valuable commodity we have. Would you rather lose ten dollars or ten years? Without time, nothing else has value, so the wise person treats it as precious.

Finish small tasks right away. Schedule time to spend on big tasks and stick to it. Clean as you go. Adopt a calendar/planner that fits your lifestyle and use a productivity system you trust. You’ll spend less time on household chores, and more time with family and friends.

Next, and this is a rather specific example but bear with me. Being uncluttered means that unexpected visitors do not elicit a stressful frenzy of straightening up. It might not happen often, but when that unannounced guest is en route to your door, a few minutes of tidying is all that is needed to make the house presentable. Compare that to the frenzy of straightening a cluttered house.

Before I continue, an important note. A working home is not a museum. As I said in 2015:

“These are the years spent in the trenches. The years where my wife and I argue over who gets to be the one to grocery shop, because grocery shopping means you get 25 minutes to yourself. If guests arrive and there’s a stack of papers on a table somewhere or library books strewn about or if our dear visitors have to witness a round of my favorite 7:38 a.m. game, ‘Where Are Your Clean Socks And Why Must We Go Through This Every Blessed Day?’, Fine.

The people who are nice enough to travel and spend money just to be in our company understand where we are at this stage in our lives. They love us, and know that transferring the breakfast cereal into labeled Tupperware containers is just under ‘jewel-encrusted, heated driveway’ on our list of current priorities.”

It’s completely unreasonable, in my opinion, to live in a clutter-free home 24/7/365. That’s not what I’m proposing. Just make an effort to tidy as you go to save some stress.

Next, your family will catch the uncluttering bug. I know, that sounds crazy. I have two teenagers whose favorite activities include sleeping, eating and playing video games. (Perhaps you’re familiar with this scenario.) If the house is routinely tidy, they won’t like it when it isn’t. In fact, they’ll start to organize to keep things on an even, tidy keel. I’ve seen it happen and it’s glorious.

When the tidying starts to happen consistently, you’ll feel more creative. This one is backed by science. Researchers at the Princeton University Neuroscience Institute demonstrated that a cluttered environment restricts one’s ability to focus. Having trouble finishing that novel or getting some work done? A cluttered desk or office could be a contributing factor.

Lastly, you’ll likely get more sleep. A sleep study conducted in 2015 showed that people who routinely sleep in cluttered rooms are more likely to have sleep disturbances and get less restful sleep than counterparts in tidy rooms. Who doesn’t want better sleep? I sure do.

There you have a few less obvious benefits to pursuing the uncluttered lifestyle. If you’ve discovered any hidden benefits to being uncluttered, please share them with readers in the comments below.

When uncluttering seems overwhelming

While browsing the Unclutterer Forums this afternoon I saw a post left by reader Marta Bergen:

I find de-cluttering overwhelming – depressing, exhausting, paralyzing. So I tried a different method – I will give myself ONE week to do ONE thing. A few weeks ago it was cleaning and decluttering the bathroom. I would spend ten minutes clearing out a drawer full of unused makeup, and the next day half an hour scrubbing the shower, but it worked!! It was the only thing on my to-do list aside from the bare-bones basics, like cook dinner & feed the dogs.

I can relate to Marta here. Uncluttering can be “depressing, exhausting and paralyzing,” especially if you’ve got a lot of other things to do, maintenance seems endless or you simply don’t know where to begin. I’ve been there myself and I suspect may other readers have, too.

Marta’s solution is a good one: focus on one activity and do not let not doing the other activities elicit any guilt. It is a fine example of breaking a project down into smaller steps. You can’t “unclutter the house” on Sunday, but you probably can clean out a drawer or clear off a shelf. Reward the victories and build momentum for more.

But there is no simple solution to feeling overwhelmed when it comes to cleaning and tidying. It’s an issue we’ve addressed over the years. In 2012, Erin listed eight steps to help you regain control of your life, including:

  1. Start saying “no.” At least for the short term, you need to say “no” to as many new responsibilities as possible.
  2. Get it out of your head. The next thing you need to do is get everything out of your mind and onto a sheet of paper.
  3. Prioritize your list. Sort your list into four groups:
    1. Must get done for risk of losing job/life/significant income
    2. Would be nice to get done and I would enjoy doing the task
    3. Would be nice to get done but I don’t really want to do it
    4. Doesn’t need to get done right now/ever and I don’t really want to do it.

Occasionally it’s easy to pinpoint the source of the overwhelming feelings. You might inherit clutter, or be dealing with children’s toys, which seem to be in all places at all times. The one that gets to me — and apparently troubles Marta as well — is an overwhelming to do list.

I love making lists. It’s typically a calming exercise that helps me feel on top of what needs to be done. That is, until the list grows to a frightening size. That’s when it’s time to employ some strategy.

As Erin wrote previously:

  1. Maintain perspective
  2. Don’t lose sight of the details
  3. Embrace some of the stress.
  4. Take breaks.
  5. Manage expectations.
  6. Don’t extend the stress.
  7. Celebrate.

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when it comes to uncluttering. With a little preparation and planning, you can get back on track.

From the forums: best uncluttering ideas ever

I was recently browsing the Unclutterer forums when I found this gem of a thread: Your Best Decluttering Idea Ever. I went through and pulled a few great ideas submitted by Unclutterer readers. Take a look, and share your “best decluttering idea” in our Forum or in the comment section below.

Zora writes:

“Back when there were only cardboard jigsaw puzzles, I cut out the top of the box, to get the picture, and then put all the pieces in a sturdy plastic Ziploc bag. Matching labels on picture and bag. Instead of a stack of large, flimsy boxes, I had a jigsaw puzzle collection that fit into a drawer.”

Great idea! For more on storing puzzles and tabletop games, check out this post. If video games are more your thing, we’ve got you covered here.

Back on the forums, reader anitamojito writes:

“I set some limits with objects I have a weakness for, such as books…I am not buying another bookcase to accommodate my habit.”

It’s important to recognize that collections aren’t inherently bad. Once you’ve identified your gathering of like items a legitimate collection, you can get down to maintaining an enjoyable, vibrant and uncluttered collection.

Lastly, greymac writes:

“Well, for me my best ever (besides just getting started!) was to get rid of ALL of my unfinished projects. Some I trashed, some I gave away — like several of the needlework projects I was obviously NOT going to finish — and some I actually finished myself. I’m slowly getting better at limiting myself to only 3 or 4 projects at a time — and feel much more energy to attack my clutter than I felt when I had dozens of unfinished piles vying for my attention!”

Boy, this one hits home for me. For years, I lived with the clutter — physical and mental — of unfinished projects. Not only were the pieces lying around, the guilt I associated with each was constantly nagging at me.

The answer for me was to take a weekend, consider each one in turn and decide — honestly — if I was ever going to finish the project. If the answer was no, off it went.

Incidentally, a similar practice can help you with “app clutter” on your smartphone. Much like unfinished projects, long-neglected apps simply sit on your phone and do nothing. Here’s a good way to identify those you actually want and those you don’t.

  1. Move all of your apps off of the home screen. Yes, all of them.
  2. As you use an app over the course of a week, move it to back to the home screen. You can even devise an order to identify which you used most often.
  3. At the end of the week, give those that never made it back a good look. Do you really need it on your phone?

A big thanks to everyone who contributed to the forum discussions. If you’ve got a single, fantastic uncluttering idea, please share it below.

Quickly unclutter any room in your house

It’s January, but here at Chez Dave we’re already thinking about storing the winter clothes (hats, gloves, etc.), and tools (shovels, ice scrapers, etc.) and pulling out the spring items. It’s an unenviable task but one that can’t be avoided. It’s also a good time to take stock of what we own and identify what can stay and what should go. That process is made so much easier by asking one simple question: If I went shopping today, would I buy this?

Before putting something into storage or taking it out, just pause. Hold an item up and honestly ask the question. If you were standing in a store with that item right now, would you pay full price to bring it home? If the answer is yes, then you’ve found a keeper. If not, then you have a reason to consider your relationship with that item. Is it actually something you want or need?

You can apply this simple technique to any room of the house and nearly every item (not the pets, please):

Kitchen

  • Tools (any unitaskers there?)
  • Plates
  • Flatware
  • Serving bowls
  • Dish towels

Workshop

  • Tape measure
  • Stud finder
  • Hammer
  • Wrenches

You get the idea. If any items are non-functional, obsolete, rarely used, etc., put them aside and consider if they really have a place in your home. Good luck and happy purging.

Tech tools for keeping New Years’ resolutions

As January yields to February, many people find themselves sliding on their commitment to New Years resolutions. Five years ago, I wrote an article on technology to help you keep those goals active. Since technology evolves at such a rapid pace, I thought an update was in order. Back in 2013, I wrote, “When deciding on a resolution(s) for the new year, keep three things in mind: acknowledge your feelings, have a plan, and take your time.” Resolution needn’t be written in stone by January first, so don’t stress if you’re still working on it. (I know someone who makes Groundhog Day Resolutions.)

As for your feelings, do your best to stay positive. Identifying a good support team can help immensely. An action plan will work wonders and help decrease feelings of being overwhelmed. I recommend breaking things down into small steps.

Some of the most popular resolutions are:

  • Get healthy
  • Earn more money
  • Become an active citizen
  • Travel

Here are some current examples of hardware and software to help you achieve each of those goals.

Get Healthy

Every January, millions of people vow to improve their health by either losing weight, adopting a healthier diet, or exercising regularly. For improving physical health I love Couch to 5K. Available for both iOS and Android, this effective, great-looking app can get you running five kilometers in just nine weeks. As a former couch potato, I can confirm that it works.

As for mental well-being, I’ve fallen in love with Headspace. It’s a great introduction to guided meditation in everyday life that is very beneficial. You needn’t be a cloistered monk to meditate effectively, and Headspace is proof of that. Just like Couch to 5K, Headspace is available for iOS and Android.

Earn More Money

Who doesn’t want a few extra dollars? I won’t dive into organizing your finances in this article, but I will recommend Betterment for helping with long and short-term investments. Betterment was founded in 2008 and it’s a quite nice product. They have low fees, a great app and, in my experience, great advice that’s always available.

Become an Active Citizen

This often gets overlooked, but it’s great for your community and sense of self-satisfaction. Countable keeps you up-to-date on what’s happening in U.S. politics, from bills to news from your local representatives. You can call your reps, share video messages with elected officials, read non-partisan news summaries, and prepare for upcoming votes.

Travel

Kayak is still my favorite travel app. It is as close to a portable travel agent as you can get. It handles everything from finding a flight to hotels, car rentals, attractions, things to do, and much more. Kayak polls several top travel sites and airlines for flights that match your criteria. The results can be filtered by airline, number of stops, airport, price, and duration. You can also sort by cost, duration, and departure time. The app is available for the iPhone, iPad, Android phones, Windows phone, and Kindle Fire.

There you have it. I hope there’s something here to inspire you to an exciting, fulfilling year. Good luck!

Organize your medicine chest

Last year we shared some advice on organizing a medicine chest. Now that cold and flu season is upon us, I want to revisit the topic with a few more best-practice tips and tricks.

As Erin previously stated, don’t store medicine in the bathroom. Humidity isn’t good for many medicines and unlocked cabinets can be an invitation to curious kids (or nosy house guests). Instead, invest in a lockable cabinet that can be mounted in a closet or somewhere similar. You’ll find the rest of Erin’s great tips here.

In this post, I’d like to offer some tips on how to organize the items within your medicine cabinet.

First, round up those little cylinders that love to fall over, roll around, and make a general nuisance of themselves. I’m talking about lip balm, sunscreen, and the like. Clear acrylic canisters will keep them tidy and easily identified.

Next, round up small metallic items like bobby pins and tweezers and stick them to a bit of adhesive magnetic strip. It will save you hours of hunting around trying to find them.

Move “leftovers” into smaller containers. You don’t need to store the last four bandages in that gigantic cardboard box that is already falling apart! Move them into something like a zipper lock bag or coupon organizer. The same goes for cotton balls, cotton swabs, etc.

If you keep cosmetics in the medicine chest, consider these stick-on mini-shelves for the inside of the door to keep them organized and separate from medication.

Lastly, give the cabinet a good cleaning. Remove everything, wipe down the entire interior with sanitizing wipes, and properly dispose of anything that is expired or no longer needed. When that is done, re-arrange the contents based on how you live. Put oft-used items front and center while moving the stuff you rarely use on a top shelf. You’ll spend less time digging around.

This is tangentially related, but I keep a dopp kit ready to go at all times, with the following inside:

  • Toothpaste
  • Toothbrush
  • Shampoo
  • Mouthwash
  • Deodorant
  • Disposable razor
  • Shaving cream

That way I don’t need to tear the medicine chest apart to find these things in an emergency or when I’m packing for a trip.

Organize a fun game night

The holidays are over and many of us are settling in for winter — hunkering down, closing the blinds and staying warm. It’s a classic time to play some board games.

Don’t think of board games as simply a way to pass the time until you can get outdoors for recreation. With proper preparation, a “game night” party can be a lot of fun for friends and family alike. For many, it’s a unique way to spend time together and socialize.

Gaming has many benefits. It is a chance to bond as a family or group of friends; an opportunity to teach young kids how to win and lose graciously (the lessons of sportsmanship aren’t unique to organized sports); to pull people away from digital screens and yes, a chance to indulge in some serious organization.

With all of this in mind, here’s how to organize a game night for your friends, family or a combination of both. I’ll describe some equipment to buy, steps to take before guests arrive to ensure a good time, and more.

A successful game night is an organized game night. A sure way to dampen the fun is to invite five or six people over to stare at each other and ask, “So, what are we going to play?” Here’s how to ensure a fun evening for everyone.

Consider who will be attending

I typically use the term “tabletop games” instead of “board games” because there’s such a wide range of gaming experiences available, from simple card games to board games many of us grew up with like Clue and Monopoly. You’ll also find mind-bending Euro-style games and role-playing games like Dungeons and Dragons. When picking games to play, know your audience.

You might be excited to get Settlers of Catan to the table, but that won’t work with a Monopoly crowd. If you group is mixed, have two separate play areas so that everyone gets a chance to enjoy the type of gaming they like.

In short, ask yourself:

  • How many people can comfortably fit in your space?
  • How many people can play the games you want to play?
  • What kind of group do you want to have?

Sometimes a game just doesn’t work so it’s great to have back up games.  Have something fun that is easily learned just in case.

Share information ahead of time

It’s a good idea to share instructions or rules before your get-together, as that can cut down on time spent teaching and learning. Board Game Geek has digital rule books for countless games that you can download for free. Share them with your guests via a cloud service like Dropbox or Box.net so they can familiarize themselves with potential games, or even decide on what they’d like to play.

Get set up

If a small group is coming, the kitchen table will probably suffice. If you have a large group on the way, (Good for you!) you’ll need tables and chairs to accommodate the extra company.

I’ve used these flexible folding chairs many times and they’re great. Lightweight and comfortable, they won’t leave you sore after a few hours of use and fold neatly away when not needed. As for a table, this folding camp table has also served me well for years.

Consider Snacks

People like refreshments at parties and game night is no exception. When planning snacks, consider what can be eaten utensil-free without being too messy.

I love these drink holders. They clip onto the edge of a table and go a long way towards preventing spills. You and your guests will be constantly reaching across the table to move game pieces, grab snacks or gesticulate wildly with each dramatic move. It’s easy to overlook a bevy of beverages, so get them out of the way.

Have a schedule

As a host, take control of game night. Guests won’t appreciate an evening that ends too early or drags on too long. Here’s a good formula to follow:

  1. Start time, about 30-45 minutes. Have drinks and snacks ready to get people warmed up and ready to spend time together.
  2. Break time. A built-in and obvious break time lets people use the bathroom, get something to eat or excuse themselves.
  3. Ending time. Let people know when the evening will end, to eliminate fears of an endless night.

Set a goal for the party

This one might seem silly but it’s essential. Have goal for the evening. “To play games” is not adequate. Maybe you’ll choose something like:

  • To laugh a lot
  • To try out a new game we’ve been itching to play
  • To welcome new neighbors
  • To get to know people better and bond a little
  • To try something new and expand horizons

When you’ve selected a goal, express it in your invitation:

Saturday at my place, let’s get together to play hilarious party games! We’ll have snacks starting at 7:00 and then break open two super fun party games: Telestrations and Wits and Wagers. We’ll wrap up by 10:30. See you then!

The day of your party

It’s game night! Now that you’ve selected appropriate games, distributed rules or other pertinent information to your guests, and set up a gaming space(s), it’s finally time to play.

Have the chosen games on display for guests to view. Let people mingle, get a snack and/or a drink and settle in. Again, take control as host and announce when it’s time to start playing, as well as the chosen games and a brief description of each. Lastly, as host, play! You might be tempted to tend to the drinks, snacks, and other guest needs. That’s noble, but your guests will appreciate it more if you play with them.

Have fun and enjoy an organized game night. You might even pick up a new hobby.

How to organize holiday gift bags

Holiday gift bags are more popular now then when I was young, and unlike wrapping paper, they’re reusable. This year we received quite a few of them and I’ve been thinking about good ways to store them. Here are a few ways to store holiday gift bags to keep them in good condition for reuse.

Magazine holders are my favorite method of organizing gift bags. You can get about two dozen bags into a single magazine holder, and the write-on label makes it easy to categorize and retrieve the one you want.

You can also use a large, handled gift bag and put the smaller gift bags inside. Once folded, sort them by size or occasion. The larger bag becomes a sort of mobile filing cabinet that you can pull out at the next gift-giving occasion. It’s easy to store, simply hang it on a hook in a closet.

An expandable accordion-style file folder is another great method, provided that your bags are relatively small. Don’t expect larger bags to fit without protruding from the top of the folder.

A hanging organizer might be useful. However if hung on a door, it may prevent it from opening all the way or bang against the door whenever it’s opened or closed. It would be great if hung on a rod in a closet though.

If the bags are not suitable for re-use, you can cut them into gift tags, use them for arts-and-crafts projects, donate them to an elementary school teacher, after-school club, or toss them into the recycling bin. In any case, have fun organizing — or saying goodbye — your holiday gift bags.

What to do with those old toys

Five years ago I wrote an article on what to do with old toys. Now that the holiday season is here, I’ve decided to revisit it. For many, the holidays means the acquisition of new stuff, and that can lead to clutter, especially if you have young children. Here’s another look at what to do with old toys, with a few updates for this year.

Donate

Donating is a fantastic option (for clothes, too).

  1. Charities are always looking for new and gently used toys. Many deliver toys directly to those who are in need while others may sell them in a thrift store. In either case, your donation can make a child’s day. Just make sure toys are undamaged and in good working order before going this route.
  2. Doctor’s offices. Many pediatricians have a “prize box” to reward their younger patients for getting through an unpleasant appointment. Books are often welcome as well, so give them a call to see if they accept donations.
  3. Daycare centers. Good luck finding a daycare that doesn’t want donations!
  4. Military families. Operation Homefront knows that military families are move frequently, and not every toy can necessarily make the trip. This great organization can help welcome the children of military families to a new city with toys just for them.
  5. Local fire department. Firefighters and EMTs often keep stuffed animals around to give to children they must transport to the hospital. Call the department in your area to see if they have such a program.

Repurpose Old Toys

As I said last time, “repurposing is where it gets fun.” Repurposing lets you get creative and even offers a way for kids to hang onto a toy (or part of it at least) they’ve grown attached to. Here are a few fun options.

  1. Animal head toy coat rack. I’ve pointed this out before and I still think it’s absolutely adorable. A very clever and useful project from Make: Craft uses the heads of discarded plastic animals to make a good-looking coat rack.
  2. Make something functional, like this Playmobil clock. It’s cute, useful and a great way to keep these adorable, vintage toys around without generating a mess.
  3. Unwanted LEGO bricks can be turned into just about anything, like this clever charging station. When they cease to be appealing toys, consider them building material.
  4. Brighten up the fridge with these great-looking puzzle piece magnets
  5. Create some art for the playroom or kids’ bedrooms.

Honor the Memory

We often fail to part with things not because of the item itself, but with the memory or emotion it represents. This is especially true as kids grow up.

My wife and I have two shadowboxes in our home: each with two or three items from when the kids were newborns. They are decorative, provide a nice memory for us and most importantly, do not waste space. Kids’ toys can be made into memory display boxes too.

Sell

You won’t be able to sell all of your old toys, of course. But some vintage toys and collectibles can attract buyers. Before you list your treasures online, you will need to take some photos. A good photo can make or break a sale. Here is a fantastic tutorial on how to photograph your items for auction sites like ebay.

There’s a lot that can be done with old toys. If you can, have your kids take part in the process you choose. They will feel a part of the decision and enjoy seeing the toy’s new role.

A simple trick for uncluttering email subscriptions

When I was young my parents often decried the junk mail that arrived at our house — catalogs, flyers, local take-out menus, etc. It was a constant influx of clutter that went from the postman’s hands, to the mailbox, to our kitchen, to the trash.

Today, digital junk mail is just as annoying. What is worse is that we invite a lot of it to our inboxes via subscriptions and newsletters. At one point, you clicked “subscribe” and began to receive periodical updates from a given provider. I’ve done it too and I’m often glad I did. But situations change, and those subscriptions become less appealing. They build up and soon the influx of email clutter is out of control.

A couple of years ago I shared suggestions for eliminating unwanted email subscriptions, and I encourage you to check it out. Today I want to share a trick that is so darn easy and effective, I just had to share it with you all. It goes like this.

  1. Open your email software.
  2. Search for the word “Unsubscribe.”

There is no step three. The result is all of the messages that include the word “unsubscribe,” the vast majority of which will let you do just that by clicking the term. Now you needn’t scroll to find them or what for a few weeks as they roll in one by one. Just search, click and they are gone. So easy.

Of course, you can get as involved with this process as you like, which I’ve described here. But this simple trick will save you a lot of time and help get the job done.