Little changes that make a big difference

Helen Rosner recently asked on Twitter, “What are some tiny things you’ve done this year to make your life immeasurably better?” She got a lot of responses, and I noticed many of them had to do with organizing and uncluttering.

Lots of people wrote about improving their closets. One person bought 100 identical hangers from The Container Store to replace her old mismatched poor-quality ones. Someone else got “the black velvet ones,” which would be the Joy Mangano Huggable Hangers or an equivalent. “Closets fit so much more, it’s easier to see what’s in there, and clothes don’t get stretched in weird ways from hanging,” she wrote.

While I understand the visual appeal of identical hangers, I haven’t yet gone that route myself — although I’ve been tempted. But I did just buy some more Olka hangers, since they’re the best I’ve found for preventing shoulder bumps. Whatever hangers work best for you, so clothes stay put and maintain their shape, can be a worthwhile investment.

Other people wrote about the benefits of owning duplicate toiletry items: one for home and one for the travel bag. For those who travel a lot, this can be a time-saver and a stress-reliever. But while Kirk England wrote, “Best $40 ever,” Bryna Levin wrote, “Except for women it’s $100-$500.” I don’t think it’s just gender that defines how expensive it would be to duplicate the toiletries — I don’t use all that many products so my cost would be well under $100. An alternative approach, for those who don’t want to make the investment, would be to develop a good packing list.

Someone else’s travel organizing change was using packing cubes. As Beth Skwarecki explained, “They let you rummage through your stuff without getting everything mixed up! They take up very little space themselves but help you pack more efficiently. I roll my clothes inside one cube, put underwear and toiletries in another, etc.”

Other small purchases also helped people be organized and save time. Leon Overweel did the often-mentioned trick for avoiding mismatched socks: “I ordered 50 pairs of basic black socks off alibaba for $22 (including shipping) and removed all other socks from my drawer. Now every morning I blindly grab two and just put them on. No more orphan socks or matching socks in the laundry!” While 50 pairs of socks is more than many people would buy, the basic concept is sound — assuming you often wear basic solid-color socks rather than more flamboyant options. Someone else added a towel hook closer to the shower. And a number of people mentioned the benefits of buying long charging cords for their mobile phones, to work around inconvenient outlets. I got a long charging cord back in 2015, and I find it invaluable.

Uncluttering was another big theme. Haley ED Houseman did what she called a “product purchase cleanse” where she used up (or gave away) the consumable products she had before buying any more. (Things that were too old got tossed.) Cathy Lanski said she “donated a bazillion sample sized products to a women’s shelter. They were sitting in a basket stressing me out, but were probably a treat to them.” A lot of these were “not quite right products from subscription boxes.” If you’re one of the many people with a large collection of toiletries, this could be the type of change you’d like to make, too.

For those who get overwhelmed with letters or email asking for donations to worthy causes (and can afford to make some donations), this change might be a good idea: “I set up recurring donations to the charities I feel strongly about, so I don’t feel bad about ignoring most of the fundraising mail I get.”

And I was delighted to see one person write, “We use grandma’s good china.” If you’re going to own “good china” it’s wise to actually use it and enjoy it.

Not everyone agreed about all the suggestions. There are the fervent bed-makers and those who feel that making the bed is a waste of time. There was one person who was delighted with her new honeycomb shaped drawer organizers for her underwear and those who refuse to fold undergarments. That’s only to be expected — organizing solutions are very personal.

My own small change this past year was storing some things more conveniently for my cat sitter — which meant the things were also more convenient for me. I just needed that “cat sitter is coming” push to get me to do some rethinking.

4 Comments for “Little changes that make a big difference”

  1. posted by Lisa on

    The bullet journal at work, and a modified form at home beside my computer have made a huge difference. No more little bits of paper with scrawled notes hanging around my desk. It is easy to find past notes. At work, when I have a few minutes to spare, I can easily find a task that needs doing, and when I think of an idea for a big project, I write it in the ‘”uture” section. A couple of those big, future projects have actually been completed, and my desk looks way cleaner and more organized.

  2. posted by Lisa on

    Oops, “Future”

  3. posted by Sharon Guzik on

    I am in the “don’t bother making the bed” camp. I have read that leaving the sheets uncovered is one way to prevent bedbugs and surprisingly they are a growing problem in our civilized society. It seems like a good reason to just let the bed be after throwing off the covers in the morning.

  4. posted by Whitney Kerr on

    Women generally pay more for certain items than men, it’s a well studied phenomenon often referred to as “the pink tax”. Sure, women who don’t consume those items anyway, or who know that the blue razor is the exact same as the pink, won’t be *as* subject to “the pink tax”, but at one point or another, they will.

    I started using my wedding china this year, and I LOVE it. I had no problem using my crystal regularly, but getting over the idea of possibly breaking a dish has given me much peace of mind. Stuff is meant to be used and enjoyed and if it’s just sitting there for fear of breaking it, it’s taking up WAY too much space in my life.

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