Book review: Let It Go

It’s All Too Much by Peter Walsh is one of my favorite organizing books, so I was eager to read Walsh’s newest book. I found that Let It Go: Downsizing Your Way to a Richer, Happier Life started out slow, but by the time I finished it I was glad I read this one.

Walsh deals with two types of downsizing scenarios. The first is if you are downsizing for yourself, and the second is if you need to downsize for a parent. He deals with both the purely practical aspects and the emotional aspects, including the family drama that can arise when dealing with a parent’s stuff.

Walsh identified three categories of things a downsizer owns: Memory items, I-Might-Need-It items, and trash/recycling. I really appreciated how Walsh has you identify the treasures among the various types of Memory items, since these treasures (vs. trinkets and such) are the items worth taking to a new home. Walsh wrote that each treasure “should commemorate a specific memory, event, or person.” He suggested coming up with a list of “bests, greatests, and mosts” from your life and then looking for one treasure related to each item on that list.

While I don’t currently need to downsize, I found it interesting to compare the treasures I identified using Walsh’s process with the short list of items I had identified as things I’d try to save if I ever needed to evacuate from my home. Sure enough, the art pieces I had chosen all fit — they are tied to memories of my mom, a dear friend, a wonderful trip, etc. I have other art I certainly enjoy, but I could leave it behind if I needed to downsize.

And looking at Walsh’s “treasure map” of possible “bests, greatests, and mosts” I saw “my greatest career achievement.” This inspired me to add two things to my evacuation list: a teddy bear I was given from a fantastic project team from my corporate days, and a coffee mug given to me by one of my many amazing organizing clients.

While this was my single biggest insight from the book, I found scattered gems throughout. For example, I appreciated this warning:

Gender-based shortcuts can save time, and they may work for your family. But they also present a well-worn rut that can lead your family away from the best solutions. …

During your downsizing process, avoid assuming that women will wrap the china and men will load the truck. In your family’s case, maybe the best recipient for camouflage clothes is a sister, and the best caretaker of a decorative glass bowl will be a 12-year-old grandson.

I also appreciated how much emphasis Walsh placed on not feeling guilty if you don’t want a loved one’s possessions — and how he encouraged parents to not push things onto their children that the children don’t want. His advice to parents:

If your kids don’t want your treasures, don’t try to guilt them into taking them. These things are important to you. They mark your happy memories, your identity, and your accomplishments. These may not be a meaningful way that your children would choose to remember you. Furthermore, your kids don’t have to have a reason for not wanting your things. They get to choose which items they want in their homes, just like you do.

One Comment for “Book review: Let It Go”

  1. posted by Pat on

    I downsized my mother several times as she moved into increasingly smaller places. One thing that my sister and I found was that if Mom was having trouble letting go of something she could not possibly use, one of us said that we would take it. We let her believe that we could use it or we knew someone who could. The object might go to Goodwill or, if it were really useless, into the trash, but it helped her to let go. She never asked about any of these objects again.

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