Choosing organizing products

I’m always interested in new organizing-related products, so I read a number of blogs often feature this kind of thing.

As I browse through these listings, I’ll frequently see something like the Alessi Blow Up wall clock. Whether or not you like the look, I’m concerned about how well it serves its purpose. When I’m looking for a clock I want a time management tool that readily tells me the current time, and this clock would make it hard for me to do that. I like an interesting organizing product as much as anyone, but my first priority is functionality.

Sometimes what’s functional for one person wouldn’t work for someone else. For example, the Kikkerland wood cube alarm clock has an interesting interface — it stays dark, looking like a simple wood cube, until you clap. But that interface wouldn’t work at all for those who need to wake up before their light-sleeping partners. And it has no snooze function, which many people would find essential. But neither of those drawbacks would be a concern for me, if I were in the market for an alarm clock.

Other products fall down in legibility, especially for those with aging eyes. There’s a lot to like about the Life.doc organizer, but I found some forms were somewhat hard to read. My eyes just didn’t do well with the forms that have dark orange type on a lighter orange background. Another product I just came across is a wall clock with hour indicators (dots, not numbers) that are hard to see because of the lack of contrast.

Sometimes a product seems great at first, but not as good with a bit more consideration. Products like the Readers Nest bookshelf seem practical, but I’d be afraid that leaving a book open on the top would not be good for the spine. But if you want to use that top space for magazines that you’ll be recycling after you read then, the concern evaporates.

If you take some time to consider your requirements when picking an organizing product you’re likely to wind up with a product that works well for you — not just one that impresses you because it looks cool. For example, if you were choosing an alarm clock you might care about the following:

  • Size of the numbers
  • Ease of setting the alarm
  • Length and loudness of the alarm
  • Number of alarms that can be set at once
  • The alarm sound (which you may want to be pleasant or annoying)
  • Battery life, if it runs on batteries
  • Noise during non-alarm run time: ticking, etc.
  • Amount of light it puts into the room, if you sleep best in total darkness

With a bit of searching, there’s a good chance you can find a product that’s functional and has a look you enjoy.

2 Comments for “Choosing organizing products”

  1. posted by Lionel on

    Thanks for the great read.

    Don’t forget to unclutter the software you don’t use too. Sometimes I just got to my computer and erase folders, software, and get rid of useless stuff. I do the same on my phone and life too. Recently, I’ve discovered an app to manage all my daily tasks, work etc. I’ve erased most of my apps because of it and now I’m finally relieved. I can recommend Hitask for you Jeri.

    P.S I’m not affiliated with Hitask at all.

  2. posted by SkiptheBS on

    Alarm clock=smartphone OE or app, although I’m delighted with my boss’s clock which projects the time on the ceiling above the bed.

    Bookcase=Kindle app and Adobe Reader

    Lauren at vortex.com has an interest in sites/apps with low-contrast fonts. They *are* ageist in function, if not in conscious intent, and they are proliferating like cockroaches in a Florida hovel.

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