Organize big and little tasks at work

I recently started a new job in a field that I left about 20 years ago. It’s been like getting back on a (rusty) bike. I know how to do what I need to do, but it’s been a while since I’ve done it. Today, I’m about five months in and finally enjoying some job satisfaction, much of which comes from managing the big projects and the little tasks.

The big projects are easy, because they become little tasks. That is, the right kind of little tasks. For example, let’s say I have to write a proposal. If I were to concentrate on “write a proposal,” I’d get stressed. There’s a lot to do. However, when the project is broken down into small, easy-to-manage chunks it becomes much easier. Day one becomes “Research one aspect of the proposal.” Sure, I can do that!

These little tasks that you define, control, and push towards a goal are gratifying. However, I want to talk today about the annoying tasks — the repetitive, inefficient, inescapable tasks. Those tasks can be annoying, yet when well-managed, they can significantly increase job satisfaction.

The first step is to get organized. List the little tasks and administrative duties that must be done. Perhaps it’s daily email triage or short summary reports that are due every Friday. I like to move important information out of email and into Todoist. Whatever those tasks are for you, keep listing until you’ve got all the tasks written down.

Next, set aside the right time to devote to them. I say the right time because that’s important. Some of my tasks don’t take a lot of time or energy so I reserve them for the end of the work day, when I’m running low on both. This way I reserve my creative energy earlier in the day for dealing with the big stuff.

But the biggest benefit is that I can complete many of these small tasks in a short period of time. It’s tremendously rewarding to mark something as complete. These tasks are quick and easy, so you get the joy of four, five, even ten in a row! It’s a great feeling and can help increase your overall job satisfaction.

Try to identify the minor hassles in your day-to-day work, and set aside a block of time that’s dedicated to addressing them. You’ll find it is a very rewarding practice.

2 Comments for “Organize big and little tasks at work”

  1. posted by Johnny Limpus on

    I enjoyed this article. As you say setting aside the right time is a skill. I think lots of people set aside time for something without having any real idea of how long it will take. This can lead to frustration when the task takes far longer than expected. Thanks again, J

  2. posted by Alina on

    Thanks for sharing your tips, David. These routine tasks can sometimes drive you crazy if not organized properly. Usually, I try to mix them with more important or longer tasks and schedule repetitive small tasks in between them. You’re right that marking the tasks as completed inspires to move ahead:) But I’d love to try your method and move all of them to the end of the day, will experiment with this.

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