Getting rid of the kitchen: social media dining

Unless you’ve been sitting on top of a mountain meditating the last five years, you’ll know the term food-porn: the exhibitionistic display on social media sites of everything we eat. I’m guilty of this, especially when it comes to the food we make at home. We love to cook and we love to share what we cook, and not just in our Instagram accounts. We also love to have people over for dinner and often when some service we use regularly does a great job, we take a cake or perhaps homemade donuts to them as a token of our gratitude.

In my search for examples of a non-ownership world, I’ve discovered a network of sites taking social media dining to the next level, like an Airbnb for meals. You join an online community, find home-based chefs in your area and look at what they are offering. You order your meal and arrange its pickup or delivery. You get a home-cooked meal without having to pay the price of a personal chef.

At first glance, this service doesn’t seem much different from the rest of the take-out options we have, but if you think about it, a home-based chef doesn’t have the high overhead a restaurant has. Nor does the home-based chef have to market; she just needs to be a member of an online community. Plus, in the majority of cases, a home-cooked meal is going to be a lot healthier than one you can get as take-out.

There is of course, one major problem with the service: in most places, it’s illegal to sell food that has been prepared in a home kitchen.

According to the digital news outlet Quartz.com, however, some U.S. states are looking to change that. California, for example, is looking at introducing a new category to its food and safety regulations, allowing home kitchens to prepare and sell food.

So, what does this mean for a non-ownership world? Back in the early 2000s, a friend of mine moved from Toronto to New York, where she said that her kitchen was so small and the local supermarkets so expensive that she found it more practical and economical to have a binder of local take-out options and only prepare breakfast at home. I’m pretty sure that if a social media dining community existed back then, she would have tossed out the take-out menus and would have enjoyed home-cooked meals on a daily basis.

Think about it… if you only had to prepare breakfast, you wouldn’t need a large kitchen. A kitchenette would be sufficient really, saving on space and energy costs. You wouldn’t need a large fridge, or even an oven. A combination microwave and grill would cover your needs. A coffee maker and a small stove top would round out all the appliances you’d need. One or two cupboards for dishes and glass. Someone dedicated to the social media dining lifestyle could pretty much do away with a kitchen altogether.

In many large cities, like New York, space comes at a premium. Put the kitchen in a walk-in closet and you have more space for living, perhaps an actual dining room, instead of having to perch on the edge of the sofa, hoping not to spill anything on the fabric.

Finally, many of those who are going to inherit a non-ownership world – the teens and twenty-somethings – have no idea how to cook and next to no interest in learning to do so. For them, social media dining has all the benefits of living at home without having to wash the pots and pans afterwards.

If you want to give social media dining a try, check out one of these communities – they might have someone in your area ready to cook for you: Josephine, MealSurfers and Umi Kitchen.

2 Comments for “Getting rid of the kitchen: social media dining”

  1. posted by Lisa on

    The hazard with home kitchens and home food prep is food safety, and lack of knowledge of safe food preparation, storage, and keeping food at safe temperatures(hot or cold) for transporting. While most home cooks are good at keeping food safe for home meals, they don’t have knowledge of proper cooling techniques for large quantities of food, and how to keep food warm at a safe temperature. Are they wearing hairnets? Hairnets, aside from the Ick factor of a hair in your food, also serve to protect the food from salmonella contamination. Salmonella can be present on hair.
    Commercial kitchens are inspected for compliance on food safety issues. Simple things, like don’t store the meat on the shelf above the produce, having adequate hand-washing facilities, proper sanitizing of tools and equipment (requires 3 sinks- one for washing, one for rinsing, and one for sanitizing) , and proper temperatures.

  2. posted by Michelle on

    People should be able to buy and sell food however they like. The free market will choose what they want. People can spend more money for something from a commercial kitchen and assume less risk, or they can save money for something home cooked and acknowledge more potential risk. Up to the person. It’s the same as Airbnb. Do you want to stay in a room in someone’s personal home which has no government inspections, or stay in a hotel with those inspections? Your choice what you prefer.

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