Open vs. hidden storage

I recently saw a video where Adam Savage from Mythbusters shared his homemade tool storage rack. Savage is someone who needs open storage. As he said:

I tend to find that … drawers are where things go to die. Drawers are evil.

Toolboxes, drawers — you put something in there, something else gets on top of them, and you never see it again. Or in the case of drawers, it goes back to the back of the thing, and it’s just gone.

He’s far from alone — many people work best with open storage. If you’re one of them, the following are examples of tools that may work better than drawers.

Pegboards

Of course pegboards work nicely in the garage for tools. If there’s no wall to put one on, you can use a pegboard cart.

Pegboards can work nicely in other rooms, too. Julia Child famously had one for her pots and pans. But they can also hold craft supplies, kitchen tools, and much more.

Magnetic options

Magnetic knife racks are one way to use magnets for open storage. But magnetic racks (or dots) can also be used to hold tools.

Joseph Joseph makes magnetic measuring spoons that can be kept out on a refrigerator or other metal surface.

Magnetic clips can also be helpful. The Endo clips can hold up to a pound, allowing all sorts of things to be stored on a metal surface.

Miscellaneous wall-mounted storage tools

Uten.silo and the smaller Uten.silo II are great (if expensive) examples of wall-mounted organizers. But you can find less expensive options, such as products from Urbio.

Another option is something like the Strap from Droog: an elastic belt that keeps things in place and very visible. Loopits is a similar product.

In the kitchen, rail systems can work nicely.

Shelves and cubbies

For some people, dresser drawers just don’t work. If hangers aren’t an option, shelves or cubbies can be used for clothes storage.

Office organizers

Instead of using a pencil drawer, you might choose one of the many neat desktop organizers available for holding pencils, pens, scissors, etc.

And a filing cart may work better than a filing cabinet.

Unitasker Wednesday: Electric Mac and Cheese Maker

All Unitasker Wednesday posts are jokes — we don’t want you to buy these items, we want you to laugh at their ridiculousness. Enjoy!

CVS is a great place to pick up a prescription and a new toothbrush. It’s also where my husband’s college buddy found this week’s unitasker selection: the Electric Mac and Cheese Maker:

He’s convinced manufacturers are trolling consumers. I might have to agree with him. An entire electric appliance dedicated to making macaroni and cheese is bonkers. There is simply no other word for it — bonkers.

On the positive side, the device appears to be made by a company called Cheese Nation. As far as company names go, that one’s amazing. “Where do you work?” “Cheese Nation.” Brilliant.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2010

2009

Offloading unwanted stuff

Receiving gifts at the holidays is fun, but it also means there’s now more stuff in your home. A few years ago, we outlined what to do with unwanted toys, including donation, repurposing, and selling. This time, we’ll look at options for moving your unwanted items of all kinds out of your home.

Yerdle

The premise is simple: “Post a pic of your unused stuff and swap it for what you want.” Take a nice photo of an item you no longer need (a tutorial on taking great product photos from the folks at Ebay will serve you well). Next, post your photos to Yerdle with a brief description. When someone likes what you have, they’ll request it. The folks at Yerdle will send you a shipping label (as long as your package is under 10 pounds). You then earn “Yerdle Bucks” that you can spend on items that you want.

Gone

Another option is Gone. The goal with Gone is to make the offloading process as easy as possible. In fact, once you’ve listed what you’ve got for sale, the folks at Gone find the best possible price for your item for you, as well as providing shipping labels and getting you paid via check, PayPal, or Amazon.com Gift Card.

OfferUp

OfferUp focuses on what’s available to you locally. It’s got more of a focus on buying than selling (the site looks like store), but you can definitely offload items to OfferUp.

Selling/donating older phones and tablets

Many people use the December holidays as the opportunity to upgrade their smartphones and tablets. While you can find a new role for your old tablet or phone, you’ve also got the option to sell or donate it.

Be sure to prepare a smartphone or table for resale or donation, including:

  1. Removing all data, and
  2. Finding the vendor you’ll use to sell or donate your phone

Companies like Apple, AT&T and Sprint (among others) have buy-back programs, while groups like Cell Phones for Soldiers and Goodwill will accept your donations.

As for choosing a vendor, you have several options if you wish to sell your device. Gazelle and GreenCitizen will both buy your devices if they meet their guidelines.

Old standbys

Of course, you can’t deny old favorites like Ebay and Craigslist. Additionally, a few years ago we looked at four ways to sell unwanted stuff, like yard sales and and consignment shops. Finally, we know it can be hard to part with sentimental items, and we addressed that issue in 2010.

The take-away here is to make room for the wonderful new things that will enter your home this holiday season.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2013

2009

  • An uncluttered liquor cabinet in time for New Year’s Eve
    Similar to traditional food pantries and linen closets, most liquor cabinets have a bad habit of things going into them faster than items coming out. Before you know it, you’ll find you have three open bottles of vermouth, two dripping bottles of Rose’s lime juice and another of the grenadine, and five bottles of the exact same type of gin. (Well, at least this is what I found lingering in my liquor cabinet.)

Happy Holidays!

We’re taking the rest of the week off for vacation, but we still wanted to wish you all a very happy holidays! We are so thankful for all of our readers. You are incredible!! See you back here next week.

A tidy method for wrapping gifts

“Will you wrap this gift for me? Just don’t look inside. It’s for you.”

I’m ashamed to admit I’ve spoken this sentence. More than once.

There are many things I can do in this world. For example, I can set up a wireless printer and play the ukulele. But until recently, I could not wrap a present well. And it is all thanks to Japan.

A few days ago I was spread out on the floor with boxes, paper, tape and bows surrounding me. Despite my sustained concentration, I was turning out one lousy gift-wrap job after another. Frustrated, I turned to YouTube. A search for “gift wrapping easy” eventually led me to the “Japanese method” of wrapping a gift.

I’ve never been to Japan and don’t know if this is how most Japanese people wrap gifts, but in any case, this method is fascinating. By placing your package on a piece of paper cut just bigger that the box meant to be wrapped, slightly off center, sets you up for this unique method. The whole thing is a few, precise, neat folds to memorize and execute. With a bit of practice it shouldn’t be too hard.

This “diagonal” gift wrapping can be done quite quickly once you’ve got the hang of it and only requires three pieces of tape. I’ve even seen it done with a beautiful cloth instead of paper, which looked fantastic.

Have you tried this method? Is there another clever, atypical and ultimately effective gift-wrapping method I should know about? Please share, because I need all the help I can get.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2009

Gift giving to collectors

Many people have some sort of collection, and I’m one of them. The collection began after I moved into my house, many years ago, and found that the pond in my front yard attracted some very vocal frogs. Now I look forward to the time each year when their croaking fills my nights.

Along the way, I began to acquire some art and décor pieces with a frog theme — along with a couple sweatshirts. I now have about a dozen frog-related items in the house. But that doesn’t mean I want gifts of even more frogs. I’m not totally opposed to additional frogs, but I don’t want the house to be overwhelmed with them, either. And I’m fussy about my frogs.

My brother, sister-in-law, and I were recently in Florida for my dad’s birthday, and one morning we did some window-shopping in an area filled with interesting stores. My sister-in-law kept pointing out the frog-themed items — fortunately, she was just teasing me.

So take this as a reminder that not everyone with a collection will want gifts that add to that collection. Some will appreciate well-chosen additions, but others prefer to do the collecting themselves, and some are looking only for very particular items. Erin, for example, limits her collection of Mold-A-Rama animals by only buying them herself.

To avoid unwanted gifts, some people with collections just don’t tell anyone about that collection. (That works well for collections that are not on public display in the home.) I’ve been told that one organizer in the San Francisco Bay Area told people she collected warthogs because that discouraged collection-minded gift-givers. But that was before the time when you could find almost anything for sale on the Internet!

But for the right person, an addition to the collection can be a welcome gift. Someone who collects Christmas ornaments, for example, might be glad to get a special one you’ve made yourself, found on a trip or at a craft fair, etc. Joyce Walder wrote in The New York Times about Bonnie Mackay and her 3,000 ornaments. (Each year, she places as many as she can on her very large tree.)

That Raggedy Andy on the tree is the first ornament a friend gave her; she had lost tracks of the friend, but the ornament kept his memory alive, and a few years ago, using the Internet, she was able to find him in Hawaii. It’s interesting, she says: no friend has ever given her an ornament she has not loved.

I had a neighbor who collected stamps and I frequently bought him additions to his collection. Not all stamp collectors would appreciate my random choices, but he did!

If you are at all in doubt, just ask your friends or relatives with collections how they feel about gifts that add to those collections. That way you’ll be able to give a gift that will be welcome, rather than one that’s just clutter.

Last day for bonus chapter and a non-unitasker on Unitasker Wednesday

In lieu of our regular Unitasker Wednesday post, I have a couple other items on tap today. First, I have a reminder to share and second, I have an almost-unitasker that managed to save itself from unitaskerdom.

The reminder: Today is the last day to sign up for a FREE bonus chapter when you pre-order my next book Never Too Busy to Cure Clutter. You can find out more about the giveaway in our previous post “The ultimate uncluttered gift,” or you can simply go straight to the form to register your purchase. (I’m emailing the chapters manually, so expect it to take a few hours for me to send it to you after you register. I mangled my attempt at writing a script to automatically send the PDF.)

Thank you to everyone who has already pre-ordered my book and/or will purchase it in the future. Thank you, thank you!

The almost-unitasker: My friend Zac is a wee-bit obsessed with his fur child, a dog named Kaylee. (She’s cute, so I can’t really blame him for his adoration.) Zac regularly posts pictures of her to his Facebook feed, and over the years I’ve watched the puppy grow into a dog and go on many adventures (mostly to the vet and dog park).

Yesterday, Zac posted a picture of a greeting card he got the dog for her birthday. My first thought was, UNITASKER! The dog can’t read!! And I was all set to use the line of dog greeting cards as this week’s Unitasker Wednesday feature. But then I went to the link he posted and realized the cards are made of raw hide and the dog can eat the card — should eat the card — and I immediately changed my mind:

If only more manufacturers were this creative and utilitarian in their designs. It’d be nice if all holiday cards had alternate purposes — such as the ones you can plant because there are seeds in the biodegradable paper. Oh! Or they could be temporary tattoos so all your friends could wear your face on their biceps for a few days. (I totally need to do this next year.) Anyway, good on Crunchkins for thinking outside the envelope.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2014

  • Organizing a home gym
    If you’re someone who is looking to workout more in the new year, the following are tips on how to get your fitness equipment in order so you can begin your workouts in a comfortable, organized space.

2013

2010

  • Getting organized for the new year
    At the start of every year, I get a new notebook and copy all of my lists from the old notebook into the new. The lists help keep me organized, but the process is a terrific way to prepare for the next year.

2009

  • Uncluttering isn’t for everyone
    As much as your uncluttering strategies and techniques have made a positive change in your life, don’t think about your way of living as being better than how other people choose to live their lives. Think of an uncluttered life as being easier for you.