Organizing for disasters

Are you prepared for a disaster: an earthquake, flood, hurricane, blizzard, fire? On Unclutterer, we’ve written about emergency supplies and about preparing your tech for a weather emergency. But having just attended a workshop led by organizer Margaret Lukens, I have the following additional tips.

Understand the scope of disaster preparedness

Depending on the situation, you may need to shelter in place or you may need to evacuate. Thinking through both of these scenarios will help you be more prepared.

Also, after a disaster, you’re likely to need all sorts of information in order to recover and rebuild your life. Be sure you’ll be able to provide the name of your insurance carrier (and preferably the policy number) as well as key financial and medical information when necessary.

Know your risks

A clear understanding of your risks will help you prepare wisely. For example, while many Californians fear their houses may collapse in an earthquake, most houses are unlikely to do so. The biggest risk is a large window breaking and shattering glass everywhere. That’s why you want to keep a pair of your shoes near the bed (stored in a bag or otherwise protected from getting glass inside them).

Know your tools

Margaret gave the example of buying a special tool designed to turn off the gas if necessary — only to find that the tool didn’t fit her gas valve. (She now has a dedicated wrench for this purpose.)

And having the tools only works if you know how to use them. Do you know how to turn off the gas (and when you should)? Do you know how to use the jumper cables you have in the car trunk? If you’re at all concerned that you might not remember in the stress of an emergency situation, you can print out the instructions and keep them where you’d use them.

If you’ve bought a pre-packaged emergency preparedness kit, be sure you know when and how each item in the kit is intended to be used.

Know where to store your supplies

Where’s the best place to store emergency supplies in your home or office? There’s no perfect answer. While places such as the front closet, the garage, the basement, or a well-secured outdoor storage container may be good under many circumstances, you can always devise a scenario under which that location won’t work.

One way to work around this is to store supplies in multiple locations. Or you can simply assume the most likely scenarios. For example, since most freestanding houses in California (with a few notable exceptions) aren’t likely to collapse, supplies stored in the house are likely to be accessible.

Know your neighbors

Having all the supplies and services you might possibly need for any type of emergency can sound daunting. But, if you pool together everything your neighborhood has, you may find that you’re more prepared than you realized. Someone may have the medical knowledge to deal with a broken arm temporarily, if getting hospital care is problematic. Someone else may have the tools needed to deal with after-disaster cleanup.

It’s also good to know which of your neighbors may need extra help in a disaster situation: people with medical issues, people who don’t speak English and therefore may not understand announcements, etc.

One Comment for “Organizing for disasters”

  1. posted by Margaret Lukens on

    I appreciate all the small steps you’ve given that we can take to “up our game” and be a little more prepared – in earthquake territory, putting spare shoes next to the bed; printing out instructions and keeping them near the tools they relate to; knowing who in your neighborhood has emergency skills such as a ham radio license or first aid training. If everyone took just a couple of the little steps available, then each of us in our communities would be much more resilient in the face of disasters. So glad you got so much from the workshop, Jeri – and many thanks for your kind words!

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