Part 1: An uncluttered back-to-school transition

Based on where you live, your kids may have already headed back to the classroom or they’re preparing to go in September. If you’re a student, you might be in the same boat. This transition period doesn’t have to be a stressful time. Households that have established routines are extremely beneficial for children and parents. Being prepared will bring peace of mind and make everyone’s transition from summer days to school days easier.

Start the school routine a week early

Practicing the routine in advance is especially important for children who are just starting school or who will be starting a new school. By doing a few trial runs before the school year actually starts, you’ll be able to determine if there are any problems with the new routine before the first day.

Plot the route

If your children are starting a new school, walk or bike with them on their route. Point out areas where there is heavy traffic and where drivers may have difficulty seeing pedestrians. Indicate safe havens where children can find assistance or a telephone if needed (e.g. convenience stores, public offices, houses of worship). Map out an alternate route home in case of emergency. If your child takes public transit or a school bus, create a plan in case the buses are late or if your child misses his/her stop.

Unplug and preset

Turning off the TVs and computers at least an hour before bedtime will allow you and/or your kids to get organized for the next morning. Make lunches (if you didn’t make them when preparing dinner) and gather school supplies together. You can even set plates, cups, and silverware on the table for breakfast.

Create a drop zone

Hang backpacks on hooks near the door so kids will know exactly where to find their stuff and where to put it when they get home. Make an inbox where they can put all the paperwork for you to fill out and sign. You can create one inbox for all the children but one box per child may work better, especially if the children attend different schools.

Prepare for the paperwork

Every year the school requires information such as health card numbers, vaccination schedules, emergency contact numbers, etc. If you know where all this information is, you’ll be able to fill out all those forms quickly and easily. Once filled out, make a copy of the paperwork for yourself. It will be easier to find the information for next year.

Create an in-home supply closet and pharmacy

Stocking up on supplies will save you from running across town to the 24-hour (expensive) pharmacy. While the sales are still going on at retailers, gather pencils, markers, notebook paper, and other supplies you and/or your children will need this entire school year (that is, if you have the space to store these items in an uncluttered way) Also, don’t forget items such as bandages, cold medication, and even lice shampoo that may be needed during the first weeks back.

Create a homework zone

While older children may benefit from doing homework in their bedrooms at a desk or in the home office, younger children who need parental support to do their homework in the kitchen or dining room while their parents are preparing dinner. Wherever the homework zone is located, make it easy to use and easy to put away supplies.

Make a “fingertip file”

Use a binder with sheet protectors to contain important information such as the school phone numbers, a list of phone numbers of friends of your children, the list of parents who carpool, menus from the local take-out restaurants, etc. You’ll be able to find what you need this school year exactly when you need it.

Get your money and tickets ready

 
Purchase transit tickets and taxi vouchers in advance, if necessary. Fill a jar or bowl with coins and small bills so you won’t be scrounging for lunch money at the last minute.

Schedule everyone’s activities on a calendar

Enter all of the school holidays and pedagogical days on the calendar as soon as the information is received from the school so that you can arrange for daycare or other activities as soon as possible. In Part 2 of our back-to-school series we’ll go into more detail about creating a digital calendar and in Part 3 we’ll explore using a paper calendar with younger children.

4 Comments for “Part 1: An uncluttered back-to-school transition”

  1. posted by Deb on

    Buy a package of plain white posterboard. You’ll thank me for this suggestion one cold snowy Sunday night, when your child suddenly remembers they need to make a map or a collage and it’s due in the morning!

  2. posted by JC on

    DH and DS usually take a 1-2 week hunting trip in September. It’s after school starts here, but during that time I make freezer meals for the next couple of months. Healthy home-cooked meals that can be thawed overnight, tossed in the pot in the morning and require minimal or no other preparation in the evening make such a difference when we are all gone during the day and have afterschool activities before dinner. I can also program the oven, so we can put in the lasagna or shepherd’s pie, etc. before we leave for karate and it’s ready for the table when we get home.

    I have found that the repeat offender is finding clothes to wear. DS (a teen, no less) invariably cannot find his socks, or his pants, or his (insert item here). He must set them out the night before.

  3. posted by JC on

    Deb, in fifth grade I told my mother the day before the class play that I was the lead and needed a costume. Thank goodness she loves me and is an excellent seamstress.

  4. posted by Jennifer on

    Deb- that is a super great suggestion! JC- I would have killed you! LOL!

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