A year ago on Unclutterer

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2009

Shredding: What to shred, and how to shred it

If you’ve been clearing out your file cabinet as part of your New Year’s resolutions, you’ve probably come across some papers that need shredding.

When it comes to shredding, people have two major questions:

Question 1: Which papers need to be shredded?

The Washington State Office of the Attorney General has a sensible list of shredding guidelines, noting the types of information you definitely want to shred if you decide to purge them from your filing cabinet. It also lists of other types of information you may want to shred — as well as a list of specific types of papers to consider shredding. The general guidelines are:

Destroy all sensitive information, including junk mail and paperwork, that includes:

  • Account numbers
  • Birth dates
  • Passwords and PINs
  • Signatures
  • Social Security numbers

To protect your privacy, you should also consider shredding items that include:

  • Names
  • Addresses
  • Phone numbers
  • E-mail addresses

Question 2: What kind of shredder should I get and what if I don’t want to buy a shredder?

When it comes to products and services for shredding, you’ve got a number of choices, so pick whichever approach works best for you.

Shredding scissors. Shredding scissors aren’t great, since they produce a strip cut rather than a cross cut, which means it would be easier for someone to reassemble your papers. If you do use these, you may want to put some of the shredded paper in one trash bag, and some in another. I’ve also been known to put shredded stuff in with the used kitty litter I’m taking to the trash, to reduce the chance anyone would go through the garbage to get it.

Shredders. You’ll find a lot of choices here, and numerous recommendations. I’ve had my Fellowes 79Ci for years now, and it has never once jammed or given me any other problem, I’m a fan. And Erin recommended this shredder, too. More recently, Erin also recommended the Staples 10-Sheet Cross-Cut Shredder with a lockout key. And the Swingline Stack-and-Shred products are interesting, since you don’t need to feed papers into them as you would with most shredders.

Shredding services. When it comes to services that will shred papers for you, you’ve also got a number of options. Some office supply stores are now providing shredding services in some or all of their locations: Office Depot, Staples, The UPS Store, etc. There are also dedicated shredding companies; you either drop off your papers or a shredding truck comes to you. A Google search should help you find one in your area.

Several years ago, organizer Margaret Lukens sent an email cautioning about some of these shredding services, and she has given me permission to share that caution with you:

Some companies tout their trucks that come around and do it on-site and let you watch. Sounds good, and I’ve used them myself on jobs in the past, but I’ve heard of whole checks making it through those shredders, and San Francisco hospital medical records showing up WHOLE in bales of paper purchased by California farmers as animal bedding. This typically happens because the teeth in the shredder get broken (someone accidentally puts their marble paper weight in the shred bin or whatever) and it costs the company too much to take that truck out of service. You see the paper go into the shredder, but you don’t see it come out — and that’s what counts!

Margaret goes on to recommend using an NAID-certified shredding company — NAID being the National Association for Information Destruction. Office Depot, Staples and the UPS Store all partner with Iron Mountain for pick-up, and Iron Mountain is indeed “NAID certified for document destruction at each Iron Mountain location in the United States.” However, Office Depot also offers in-store shredding for smaller jobs, which would not be under the control of Iron Mountain.

The non-shredding alternative: stampers. Stampers are designed to obliterate your confidential information so the papers don’t need to be shredded. If you’re considering this approach, I recommend organizer Julie Bestry’s comprehensive look at the pros and cons of using these products.

Related question: Which papers should I keep and which papers should I purge?

Erin’s infographic on What to shred, scan, or store? can help you answer this question. Also, check with a local accountant and lawyer to be sure you’re keeping the appropriate papers for where you live — some states have different requirements than the IRS when it comes to retaining original documents.

Unitasker Wednesday: USB Foot Warmer Slippers

All Unitasker Wednesday posts are jokes — we don’t want you to buy these items, we want you to laugh at their ridiculousness. Enjoy!

Today’s unitasker selection fits nicely into the “this is an incredibly bad idea” category. At first glance, it might not seem that awful. They’re just an innocent pair of fluffy looking USB Foot Warmer Slippers:

Kissing piggies!

Then, you realize having something on your feet that is attached to your computer is a horrid idea. It’s one thing to absentmindedly walk away from your computer and have earphones yanked out of your ears. It’s a completely different situation when you walk off wearing a pair of slippers attached to your computer. I give your machine about a week before you destroy it. Okay, two days.

Plus, let’s all agree the USB ports on your computer should be used for productive devices like monitors and scanners and back-up hard drives. Let’s leave warming up our feet to socks and non-USB-powered slippers or those heat-pack things.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2013

2010

  • Ask Unclutterer: Coat control
    I live in Brooklyn on the top floor of a Brownstone and have NO coat closet, which is killing me this winter because our coats just end up all over the kitchen table. Do you have any ideas/suggestions for coat/hat/gloves/boot storage for a small apartment?

2009

Getting started with a daily routine

A few years ago, I was fed up with the frenzy of realizing something important was due … two hours after I had missed a deadline. After much trial and error, and a little dragging of my feet, I’ve established a workable daily routine. For me, adherence to a routine is especially important. Since I work from home, I’ve only got six hours to myself while my wife and kids are at school, and enough work for much more than that. I keep it all manageable, in part, with a fixed routine. It’s all about knowing what’s coming, preparing ahead of time, and finding a “home” for key items and ideas.

The view from up here – knowing what’s coming

Before we get into the nitty-gritty of my routine, I must briefly address projects. I define a project as David Allen does: anything that takes more than one action step to complete. Therefore, “land the new client” is a project, but so is “give Jr. permission to go on the field trip.”

In Getting Things Done, Allen emphasizes the importance of dealing with your stuff “when it shows up, not when it blows up.” If you can get past the Doctor Phil-ness of that rhyme, you see the wisdom in it. Remembering Jr.’s permission slip is no good after he’s been at school for two hours.

With this in mind, I have a running list of what tasks need to be done. My list is a week long, and it lives on a bulletin board behind my desk (I’ve previously written about my search for the perfect bulletin board). Each Sunday, I review what must be done over the next week, write those actions on index cards, and pin them to the board.

Preparing ahead of time

It took me years to learn this lesson. Remember the kid who was always rushing last second to finish that paper in school?

Hello. Nice to see you again.

Today I’ve finally realized that I’m not an adrenaline junkie, and that last-second frenzy is not something I enjoy. As a result, my daily routine actually begins the night before. As evening draws near, I:

  1. Make sure the kids’ bags are packed for school and that all required papers, etc. are inside those bags.
  2. Ensure that clean, weather-appropriate clothing is available for school the next morning.
  3. Review the “home” calendar (I have a separate work calendar) for pressing to-dos (sign permission slips, special pick-up or drop-off arrangements, etc.) and act accordingly.
  4. Review what’s due at work tomorrow, make sure it’s written down, and any necessary materials are ready to go for the morning.

Your evening prep list might look different, but the idea is the same: review what’s due tomorrow — be it a PowerPoint presentation or snow boots and gloves — and get it as ready as you can the night before.

Finding a home

Being who I am (warning: one NSFW word in the title of the linked post) I tend to misplace things. Just like the sun tends to be hot. So, a part of my daily routine has been to ensure that everything is where it needs to be.

This isn’t the same as my evening prep. Instead, I’ve established a “home” for important items when they’re idle. For example, car keys are always in the Roscoe, New York, coffee mug on my night stand. Always. My coat and hat live on the second peg of the closet door. Even when I’m walking around, I know which pocket each doohicky should inhabit (phone is right front, every day).

Following these rules impacts my day significantly. I can’t afford to spend 10 minutes here and 15 minutes there looking for who knows what. I’ve done that and it’s not fun. An ongoing part of my daily routine is to put everything in its proper place as I go.

General guidelines

The website Personal Organizing has shared some good, general tips for establishing and, more importantly, adhering to a daily routine. Some highlights include:

  1. Make breakfast simple. Find something nutritious that you can routinely prepare without much fuss.
  2. Organize the kitchen and pantry cabinets. Meal prep is easier, and everyone living with you can answer, “where does this go?” all on their own.
  3. Have a good mail management system. In regards to paper mail, my wife and I have our own desks for processing this stuff, and that’s been a godsend.
  4. Get the pets on a schedule. It takes some doing, but it’s definitely worth it.

Book review: Joseph Ferrari’s Still Procrastinating

Still Procrastinating: The No Regrets Guide to Getting It Done is a book that explains, in an easy-to-read format, the results of the past 20 years of scientific studies on procrastination and procrastinators.

The book defines procrastination as “the purposive delay of the starting or completing a task to the point of subjective discomfort.” More simply, procrastinators voluntarily do not work on important tasks and feel bad or uncomfortable about their delays because they know that this course of action will have negative effects in the future.

Studies cited in the book indicate that although everyone procrastinates about a few things, approximately 20 per cent of adult men and women are chronic procrastinators — they procrastinate habitually in many different areas of their lives. The studies also show that procrastination is a learned behaviour. If people understand why they procrastinate, they can get the support they need and develop strategies to help them learn new behaviours.

There are several types of procrastinators identified in the book.

Thrill-Seekers: These procrastinators claim they do better under pressure, when they feel the deadline is looming. Scientific studies show that these types of people are easily bored and the adrenaline rush of completing the task just before the deadline is a thrill they enjoy. What the studies also show is that even those these types of procrastinators believe they produce better results at the last minute, in reality they make more errors and do not complete all of the task’s components thoroughly.

Indecisives: These types of procrastinators delay making a decision until a choice is made for them. For example, they may wish to purchase tickets for the symphony but they can’t decide which night to attend and they delay so long that there are no tickets available. Studies show that Indecisives may have grown up in situations that did not allow them to acquire good decision-making skills.

Self-Saboteurs: These procrastinators intentionally place obstacles in their paths to prevent successful performance of a task. In this way they can blame external factors, such as not having enough time, to mask their anxiety and self-doubt. However, if this type of procrastinator completes the task successfully despite the obstacle, he/she will protect his/her self-esteem. Many of these self-saboteurs have low self-control. They are unable to delay their need for instant gratification and focus on the task at hand. They do not often reward themselves for a job well done and instead enjoy the “fun stuff” before they get their work done.

Perfectionists: Perfectionist procrastinators maintain impossibly high standards. They delay starting or finishing a task because being perfect is not realistically achievable. These types of procrastinators have a strong desire to be liked by others and show how hard they are working. They often justify their procrastination by saying delays will result in a better quality of work but this is not usually the case.

Regardless of the type of procrastinator with which people identify, Dr. Ferrari is optimistic about procrastinators changing their habits and behaviours. He suggests starting with small changes and gradually progressing. He indicates that getting organized is “Your Secret Weapon in Task Completion.” Do any of these four types of procrastination ring true with you or are you someone who only occasionally puts off tasks?

Professional organizers can certainly help procrastinators in their efforts to become non-procrastinators by helping them declutter, minimize distractions, and improve their time and task management skills. Sometimes consulting a mental health professional such as a cognitive behavioural therapist, may be helpful. Seeking support from family and friends who are non-procrastinators is advisable. These are the people that care for you and will hold you accountable for your changes in behaviour. Checking in daily with an accountability partner or having someone hangout with you as you work on a project at home (like cleaning out your closet) can be beneficial.

Dr. Ferrari states that procrastination is more than just having poor time management skills. Procrastination is an ineffective strategy to cope with the challenges of everyday life. By focusing on the positive aspects of your life and taking action, you can become less stressed and more productive.

A year ago on Unclutterer

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2009

Buy, organize, and store household batteries wisely

Modern life is jam-packed with two things: cables and batteries. So many things must be plugged in or charged up regularly that it’s hard to keep up. Rechargeable batteries are especially burdensome because you’ve got to keep track of which are charged, which aren’t, where the charger is, and so on. Isn’t technology supposed to make life easier?

Last year I wrote about organizing, storing and buying cables wisely, and today I’m going to look at batteries. Let’s begin by looking at the different types and the best use for each, as outlined by Michael Bluejay.

Battery types and their best uses

Two are two main categories of household batteries: rechargeable and disposable. Each category has four main types. Let’s begin with rechargeable batteries, as they’re becoming more prevalent, both as a source of power and clutter.

Rechargeable Batteries

  1. Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH). These are good for most applications, but don’t have the longest shelf life.
  2. LSD (low self discharge) NiMH. Again, good for general use, with the added benefit of longer shelf life than non-LSD NiMH. Meaning that, once out of the charger and sitting on a shelf, they hold their charge longer.
  3. Nickel-Zinc (NiZn). Use these with devices that will benefit from extra voltage like a digital camera. Note that with devices that don’t need the extra juice (say a Bluetooth computer mouse or keyboard), you should stay away from NiZn. Also, this group of batteries has a short shelf life.
  4. Rechargeable Alkaline. Now we’re talking about the longest shelf life of any rechargeable battery, including LSD NiMH. Use with devices whose batteries aren’t replaced often, like radios or clocks.

If rechargeables aren’t your thing, good old disposables are still around.

Disposable Batteries

  1. Alkaline. These are the inexpensive batteries that you see everywhere. Reserve for low-drain devices like remote controls.
  2. High-Drain Alkaline. These are disposables meant for high-drain devices like a digital camera. Seriously though, it’s much more economical to use a rechargeable battery in this situation.
  3. Lithium. These are powerful little batteries but, of course, you can’t recharge them. However, they are good for smoke detectors as the small amount of drain the detectors put on them means they’ll last a long time (but change your smoke detectors batteries twice a year, okay?).
  4. Carbon Zinc, Zinc Chloride. Often the least expensive, these are good for low-drain devices. That tiny night light in Jr.’s bedroom? Here you go.

At this point, you’ve identified the type(s) of battery you need and now it’s time to store them. Perhaps you know how much fun it is to go on a hunting expedition for a working battery, or take batteries out of one device just so you can add them to another. My personal favorite is picking up a rechargeable and thinking, “Hm, is this charged? I don’t know.” Let’s eliminate all of that nonsense.

Super battery storage solutions

The Range Kleen organizer is pretty nice. I like this because it accommodates all sizes of household batteries and presents them so you can see instantly what is available. It also comes with a built-in tester, so you can know how “good” a battery is before installing it. It’s a little big, which is its only real downside.

Arts and crafts bins also work well and often have the benefit of a lid, are semi-opaque, and stackable. A few minutes with your label maker helps a lot, too.

If you’d rather save a few bucks and go DIY, consider those disposable deli containers. They don’t hold as many batteries as the larger cases, but cost a lot less. You can even get crafty and use vintage coin purses and labels, if you’d prefer not to see a big, ugly plastic bin of batteries. Chunky diner mugs work well, too.

Ninja level battery management

When you’re ready for world-class battery organization, read insights from Quentin Stafford-Fraser. Quentin recommends you do five things:

  1. Spend some money on an initial cache of batteries. You’ll eliminate that last-second hunt that keeps everybody waiting.
  2. Dedicate space for battery storage. Quentin uses a series of hardware bins with labels like “AAA Flat” and “AAA Charged” for easy reference. When the “flat” bins get full, he begins recharging.
  3. Invest in good batteries. Quentin recommends the Sanyo Eneloop. Incidentally, that’s the same brand of battery that Apple ships with its own charger. I can attest to the fact that they last a long time. Erin uses the Amazon Basics rechargeables, which many users believe to be rebranded second-generation Eneloops.
  4. Buy a decent charger. I’ve fiddled with chargers from brands you’d recognize that failed to perform to my expectations. Get yourself a good one. Again, Erin has a personal recommendation here, and suggests the La Crosse Technology recharger for AAs and AAAs.
  5. Get a good tester. The Range Kleen I mentioned above ships with a tester. A stand-alone model like the ZTS MBT–1 Pulse Load Multi Battery Tester will set you back a few bucks but last a good, long time.

Disposing of old batteries properly

Even the best batteries will eventually give up the ghost. Unfortunately, there’s no single solution for getting rid of them. The process depends on the type.

According to Duracell, common alkaline batteries can be tossed into your household trash. The company notes that it hasn’t used mercury in its batteries since 1993, which is a good thing. Check with your preferred manufacturer to see how the’ve addressed concerns over their products’ chemistry.

Rechargeable, lithium, and zinc batteries should be recycled. You can find a compatible recycling center in your area via the Battery Recycling Corporation’s Call2Recycle program. You can also check the website for your local county and/or municipality’s hazardous waste program. These governmental jurisdictions almost always have a program just for battery collection.

With some planning, proper storage, and knowledge of what you need, you can eliminate a lot of battery hassles and reduce the clutter they produce at the same time.

Unitasker Wednesday: Twinkie Maker

All Unitasker Wednesday posts are jokes — we don’t want you to buy these items, we want you to laugh at their ridiculousness. Enjoy!

The first weekend of May each year is the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival in Howard County, Maryland. For those of you who have not attended (probably most of you), it is similar to a state or county fair but with no cows, no pigs, and nothing carved out of butter. Almost all of the vendors are selling yarn, raw wool, farm supplies for caring for your flock of sheep, or food made out of lamb (which, is a little disturbing at first, but you get over it because lamb sausage tastes amazing). There are also 4-H style competitions regarding sheep breeding and herding and it is a wonderfully good time, seriously.

I have been to the Sheep and Wool Festival numerous times over the years and, although I claim my favorite part of my day is looking at some of the most beautiful yarns made in the US, it really isn’t my favorite part. Here’s a secret: my favorite thing about the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival is eating a deep fat fried Twinkie.

I do not, as a general principle, eat Twinkies. They terrify me. I watched the time lapse video of a Twinkie never rotting and that sort of put an end to my desire to ever consume them or feed them to my kids. I like to eat food that eventually can go bad. Except, once a year, the siren call of the fried Twinkie beckons me — a Twinkie on a stick, dipped in sweet batter, deep fried, and then sprinkled with powdered sugar. I don’t know how, but it is truly delicious.

This week, an Unclutterer staff writer emailed me a picture of the Twinkie Maker and my temptation went into overdrive. I could MAKE MY OWN TWINKIES!

My homemade Twinkies wouldn’t have any preservatives and they could actually rot! I could make deep fried Twinkies at home whenever I wanted! I could …

And that is when the answer struck me.

The reason deep fried Twinkies taste so good is because of all the fat and preservatives and things that make it so horrible for me. A “healthy Twinkie” is not a Twinkie at all. It’s a thing wanting to be an actual Twinkie, a sub-par pathetic replica. It’s like tofu pretending to be meat or flax pretending to be an egg. The only way to enjoy a deep fried Twinkie is at the Festival, once a year, among beautiful yarn and barking border collies.

Alas, the Twinkie Maker is nothing but a unitasker in sheep’s clothing.

A year ago on Unclutterer

2013

2012

2011

2010

  • Increasing energy: Erin’s first set of 2010 resolutions
    I’ve written in the past about how getting adequate sleep is linked to an uncluttered life. If I’m exhausted, I’m less likely to eat well and exercise (also energy related), tackle items on my to-do list, think and work efficiently and clearly, keep up with chores, stay focused, and respond well under stress. One hour of missed sleep can tank my productivity the following day.
  • Unitasker Wednesday: Chair socks
    Look at these cute socks. Oh, wait. You’re saying they’re not socks I can wear? They’re socks for my chairs?
  • James Jamerson’s Uncluttered Bass Rig
    I’ve written before about my constant battle with an affliction called Gear Acquisition Syndrome (GAS). It’s an almost compulsive need to purchase new equipment in the firm belief that the new item, be it a guitar, amp, or effect pedal, will be the spark that ignites stale monotony into inspired genius. Sometimes it works, but I find that more often, buying new equipment is just a substitute for doing the hard work required to be creative.
  • Build your own recyclable furniture with Grid Beam
    Grid Beam allows you to use a few standard modular and reusable components to create whatever structure you need at the moment.

2009

  • Book review: The Power of Less
    If you are looking for sound advice on how to improve your productivity, The Power of Less will help you to be more efficient in all your dealings.

The final step in uncluttering

If you’re one of the many people who has resolved to get uncluttered this year, you may wind up with lots of stuff that you’ve decided can leave your home or office. Now what? Where can these things actually go?

Sell your stuff

If you can get enough money for your items, it may be worth your time to sell them.

Garage sales or yard sales have a social aspect that some people enjoy. Proper preparation will help you get the best results. Before you have one, though, be sure to check your local homeowner’s association bylaws and municipal laws and ordinances to learn if they are permitted and, if they are, if there are restrictions on dates, times, locations, and collection of taxes/fees.

Online sales through sites like Craigslist (if you want to stay local), eBay, and Amazon.com give you a wider audience. There are also specialty sites for selling items like wedding gowns. Again, you’ll want to be sure to follow the best practices for using each of these sites. For example, Man vs. Debt has some advice about using Craigslist.

There are also buyers for specific types of items. Books, CDs, vinyl records, china, designer clothes, sports equipment, and cell phones are just some of the things that specialty stores and/or websites will take. If you’re trying to reduce the quantity of things you own, you may want to look for places that will buy for cash, not just provide store credit.

And, if you have something you know (or suspect) may have some significant value, you may want to check with a certified appraiser.

Donate your stuff

Sometimes getting the tax deduction for donating your items seems better than going through the effort of selling them — plus you can help a good cause. Check carefully as to what each group accepts; you may be surprised both at what won’t be accepted and what will. Groups like Goodwill and Vietnam Veterans of America take a large number of items. Many local charities have thrift stores to help support their work, and they take a large number of items, too.

There also are places to donate specific types of goods, too. For example, many cities have organizations that collect clothes and accessories appropriate for the workplace. Your local humane society or pet rescue group may want things like old blankets, sheets, and towels. And some cities have charities that collect art and craft supplies for teachers and artists.

Give things away

If you have things you know a friend or relative would appreciate, you can pass them along. People have also had success offering things to the members of their parents’ group or other such communities.

You can give to strangers by putting things out on the curb with a “free” sign (if you live in a high volume location and it’s legal where you live) or leave them in a common area in your apartment building (if that’s allowed).

You also can use groups such as Freecycle, or you can use the Free section of Craigslist. And some people have used their Facebook pages or their blogs to offer things to others.

Recycle your things, or dispose of them safely

Some things just aren’t in any condition to be sold or even donated, but can still be recycled; common categories include paper, cans, and glass. And some things are toxic and need to be disposed of properly, like batteries, household hazardous waste, and prescription medicines. Check to see how such items are handled in your specific locale. Many hospitals and pharmacies will accept old medications to destroy, but call first to learn of their exact policies.

Earth911 has a database to help you find places to recycle a wide variety of materials through the United States. Your local city or county government, or your local trash collector, may also have useful information. And your local professional organizer probably knows good places to sell, donate, or recycle almost anything you have.

Move things out!

Sometimes people get held up by trying to find the absolute best home for everything they are purging. This can make sense if you have a small number of items, or some very special things. But, if you’re doing a major uncluttering project, you may want to cut yourself some slack. Instead of looking at each item of clothing and figuring out if you know anyone who’d like it, take those 9 bags to Goodwill or a local charity’s thrift shop.

50 ways to use a basket

“My stuff is all over the place”, she said to me.
The answer is easy, organizationally.
I’d like to help you in your desire to be neat,
There must be fifty ways to use a basket.

Organizing doesn’t have to be expensive or complicated. Small baskets can be purchased at discount stores and can be used in many ways. Put them in drawers to group similar items together. Put them on counters to stop clutter from spreading. The following is a list with 50 ways to use a small basket.

In the kitchen:

  • to group spice jars together
  • to hold packets of sauce mixes
  • to hold lids for reusable food plastic storage containers
  • to group small, sharp knives together in the drawer
  • to group measuring spoons in the drawer
  • to hold all the parts for the food processor
  • to hold re-usable wine corks
  • to hold twist ties
  • on the counter to hold the plugs for the kitchen sink and the pot scrubber

In the fridge:

  • to group together small round cheeses, cheese slices and cheese sticks
  • to hold mini yogurt containers
  • to contain single use soy sauce, mustard, and ketchup packets for lunches

In the office desk drawer for:

  • paper clips and staples
  • tape, hole punch
  • erasers and correction fluid
  • highlighters, markers
  • pens, pencils
  • batteries and small screwdrivers
  • postage stamps and envelopes

In the bathroom to contain:

  • eye glass cleaning accessories
  • contact lens accessories
  • hair elastics, barrettes, etc.
  • make up and accessories
  • nail polish and nail care accessories
  • razors, shaving accessories
  • bandages, antibiotic cream
  • dental supplies (toothpaste, floss, etc.)
  • feminine hygiene supplies

In the bedroom:

  • to group jewelry on the dresser
  • to hold coins found in pockets
  • beside the bed to hold lip balm, hand cream, etc.

At the front entry to hold:

  • spare change from pockets
  • wallet, keys
  • cell phone and Blackberry
  • shoe polish and rags

In the toolbox for:

  • small screwdrivers
  • drill bits
  • sockets for socket wrench
  • router bits
  • hooks, nails, screws
  • clips and clamps

To contain children’s:

  • paints, brushes
  • beads and thread
  • yarn and knitting needles
  • crayons
  • doll clothes and shoes
  • blocks
  • small parts for board games
  • playing cards

In the car’s glove box to contain:

  • mini measuring tape, pen, cell phone recharging cord, sunglasses