Home Forums Welcome Hello! Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

This topic contains 20 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by Avatar of lahope lahope 3 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #158506
    Avatar of jsights
    jsights
    Member

    I have a Rubbermaid bin of my old motorcycle gear. I totalled my bike 8 years ago, but kept the gear (leather gloves, chaps, vest, raingear, armored coat, things like that.) Every tax season for the past 3 years I’ve told myself I’ll use my tax return to buy another bike. I have the itch bad, I REALLY want another one. But every year something comes up that I have to be a responsible adult and spend the money on something else. So now it’s “in 2011 I’ll get a new bike.” Should I just get rid of my gear, and replace it whenever I do get a new bike? I know if I get rid of it, then get a new bike next year, I’ll kick myself. But if I keep it, and don’t get a new one, I’ll kick myself. Especially since I’ll have much less storage space at the apartment I’m moving to this Friday.

    What do you all think I should do? This stuff isn’t cheap to replace, and for me, is an absolute necessity if I’m riding. I refuse to ride without all the protective gear. But it seems my dream of owning another bike keeps being thwarted by the cruel necessity of being a responsible adult (I really hate that sometimes!)

    Thanks for the thoughts!

    Jen

  • #164875
    Avatar of JuliaJayne
    JuliaJayne
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    Were you injured in the accident? I know this is very personal, but is it possible that you’re a little leery about riding a bike again? That happens after bike accidents, especially serious, life changing ones.

    Maybe you could sell your gear now and start a savings account/new bike fund with the money. Just a suggestion.

  • #164882
    Avatar of ArtGal
    ArtGal
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    I am not familiar with motorcycle gear, but do parts of it deteriorate over time? Also, is it updated periodically for better safety? I would say that if the answer to either of these questions is yes, sell it and get safer, updated equipment later (AFTER you get the new bike :)

  • #164885
    Avatar of chacha1
    chacha1
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    The gear is muy expensivo. I would do a drill down (The Five Whys) to determine why you *really* haven’t bought another bike. If ultimately the reason is fear, you have two choices: get back on the horse, or accept that your cycling days are over.

    Aside: Is there some other way you could get the same thrill that you used to get on your motorcycle? I understand it’s a pretty unique experience.

    But how about this: rent a motorcycle a few times. Get used to it again. Decide if that’s how you want to do your everyday running around, or not. There’s no good/bad answer, just what works for you – but renting is potentially a good way to have a bike only when you need/want/are really going to use one.

  • #164891
    Avatar of Mrs.Mack
    Mrs.Mack
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    If you have no subconscious qualms or fears of riding again, as the above posters seem to think you have, and you are determined to get a bike, keep it.

    BUT!

    You must also made a bike fund. Start setting aside whatever you can each week or month (depending on how you handle your finances/balance your checkbook). $100. $25. $5. Whatever your budget allows. If it means foregoing a cup of coffee each morning, isn’t that worth it? Getting back on the bike is more important than Starbucks, isn’t it?

    This way, even if something “adult” and important comes up after the next tax season, at least you can look at that bike fund that’s slowly growing and know that even if it doesn’t happen this year, it WILL happen. And if you can use the tax return for the bike in ’11, you’ll have a bit of money saved up for additional gear! ;)

    (PS, I agree with ArtGal that if any of it is deteriorating or is not up to safety standards, it should be tossed. Keep only the things that will last.)

  • #164894
    Avatar of jsights
    jsights
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    JuliaJayne, I don’t mind the question. I had some minor injuries, and yes, I was scared to get back on for a while. That’s why I didn’t immediately replace the bike. I also think, had the bike not been totaled, I’d still be riding. By the time I was ready to get back on, I had bought a house, and then things kept getting in the way.

    Mrs. Mack, no idea why I haven’t thought to start a bike fund! That’s a great idea. The past few years have been pretty tough financially, so it’s just been a matter of trying to pay the bills each month. I finally have everything in order, though, and things are looking up. So I will start a bike fund. Thanks for the suggestion!

    The gear hasn’t deteriorated. I would get a new helmet, as that is the most important thing, but I’ve made sure everything has stayed in good condition. I just tried the coat on the other day to check on it. I would definitely get rid of something not in good condition…safety gear doesn’t do any good if it’s not up to par! Leather is leather is leather, but helmet technology most likely has improved. And the helmet I had on during the crash went straight in the trash anyway.

    And chacha1, I am going to take a motorcycle safety course this year. I’ve moved from Missouri to Illinois and back, and the bike endorsement didn’t transfer across with my license, so I’ll need to take the test again, and having a refresher after 8 years is a good idea. I do plan to do that before I get a new bike…because how else would I get it home otherwise? :)

    Thanks for the input guys! This has been very helpful.

  • #164899
    Avatar of Amy
    Amy
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    If you have room to store it and you want to hang on to it, then that’s what you should do. You don’t always have to part with things just because they are “extra”. When a person gets rid of more than they truly want to get rid of, they sometimes feel deprived. Uncluttering is supposed to make you feel better, not anxious about a perceived loss.

  • #164901

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    I also own bike gear that has been in storage for a very long time I think the last time I used it was 19 years ago. I was considering selling it but I am concerned that even though the leather seems fine the cotton that is holding it together may not be in such good shape. There is no visible defects but some biker friends of mine who are very safety conscious suggested this could be an issue.

  • #164916
    Avatar of bandicoot
    bandicoot
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    ahhhhh motorbikes.

    i had a motorbike as my sole transport for 9 long years.
    one day, i bought a car, just as a stopgap measure you understand….and i didn’t get onto another motorbike for the next 13 years.
    at 41, on a complete early midlife crisis whim, i went out and bought a beautiful honda shadow 750.
    i rode it home and my husband fell madly in love with it instantly, and pretty much removed it from my hands right away.

    so, a few weeks later, i bought another one.
    before the new one arrived, my husband had an accident with two tourists driving a motorhome on the wrong side of the road.
    he was extremely lucky and only broke a collarbone.
    for six weeks i had to run our business on my own and his share of it involves a lot of heavy lifting.
    i couldn’t get any help and we had orders to fill and it was a nightmare that went on and on.
    there was no time for fun times on the motorbikes, trust me.

    so, eventually all was healed; but i found that i had actually lost my nerve when i saw my husband lying in the local hospital with his neck in a brace and his jacket cut off him.
    and so my bike sits and sits in the shed.
    my husband rides his bike daily and enjoys himself thoroughly.
    i haven’t been out at all in over a year.
    it is definitely something i have to make a decision about….i always vowed i would never be one of those people with a decorative motorbike.
    and look at me!

    365lessthings, i bet you could post that jacket to captain black in bali and they would sew it up like new, very reasonably, and post it back to you.
    i have been to his shop and had my leather jacket made there. very nice guy.

    http://www.baliblog.com/places-to-go/regional-guides/captain-black-leather-jackets-made-to-order-in-kuta-bali.html

  • #164917
    Avatar of jsights
    jsights
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    365lessthings, I hadn’t thought about the cotton deteriorating. I just went through my gear last night, and decided to get rid of my leather vest, but keep the chaps, which are all leather sewn together with leather, and zippers. My armored coat is canvas based. Thanks for pointing that out though…I’ll keep that in mind for sure!

    jen

  • #165147
    Avatar of trillie
    trillie
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    There is already some amazing advice here, so I’ll keep it short: jsights, it seems like you really do want a bike again soon, so I think you should keep a) everything that fits into a defined space (like one closet shelf or that rubbermaid bin you have), b) everything that will be still wearable in two years, and c) everything that really fits you well and is “yours” (such as your helmet, leather pants, or gloves). And that “bike fund” is a great idea — and it could become a “bike and equipment” fund, too, so you don’t have to have a bad conscience if you declutter something now.

    Oh, and bandicoot, if in the end, your decision is to sell the bike — why not sell it to jsights? ;o) Bam, two birds, one stone ;o)

  • #165179

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    Dude I am an avid motorcyclists love them and everything that goes with them. Stay strong be brave and get back on that ironhorse. I am a 43 year old female been married 25 years and have two children and nothing compares to the love I have for motorcycles the feel of them coming to life. Keep your stuff just in case. It will take you back. I have rode motorcycles since I was 9 and when I get on to ride and am always 9 again. The bike fund idea I would start that in the morning just throw your change in a wine jug everyday and before you know it you might find yourself a real deal on a little ironhead sportster somewhere

  • #165193
    Avatar of jsights
    jsights
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    I moved into the new apartment over the weekend, and there’s a little nook that works perfectly for this. It’s a townhome, and the washer/drier is in a closet under the stairs. At the base of the stairs is a tiny nook just big enough for 1 rubbermaid bin, that once you put the washer/drier in place, you can’t even get to it without moving them. So, the bike gear when in there, since I won’t need to access it until I get a new bike. Worked great!

    Thanks for the suggestions all!

    Jen

  • #165242
    Avatar of trillie
    trillie
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    Sounds good! I hope you keep us updated when you get the bike in 2011 :o)

  • #165244
    Avatar of rdshapiro
    rdshapiro
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    Just one thing … I know you said that you are going to change helmets if you get started again, but just so you don’t change your mind, helmets DO age. They expire in 2-5 years. The foam loses its resiliency and the helmet loses some of its effectiveness.

    Rich

  • #165249
    Avatar of PianoLady
    PianoLady
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    I think your gear will be fine. You already said you threw out the helmet which is good, because as already said, helmet technology changes and the foam can break down from sweat. Also remember that helmets are designed for one impact only, so if you should accidentally drop it from knee height or higher, it can crack even if you don’t see it, thus rendering it useless in a crash.

    I LOVE my bike. I have a Honda Shadow 600 and I love getting 70 miles to the gallon. I would strongly encourage you to look into getting another bike, or as someone else suggested, renting one to see if you’d really like to do it again. And if you don’t mind, I’ll be the little devil on your shoulder saying “Being a responsible adult can include a bike which is better on gas mileage and releases less emissions than a car.”

    I like that you kept the gear though. Safety comes first because nomatter how long you’ve been riding, it’s the other drivers on the road that you cannot trust. If you go for your motorcycle dreams, stay safe!

  • #165256
    Avatar of G.
    G.
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    Jen -
    I noticed that you wrote “Every tax season for the past 3 years I’ve told myself I’ll use my tax return to buy another bike.” and “But every year something comes up that I have to be a responsible adult and spend the money on something else.” My thinking is – if you are getting a refund every year big enough to get another bike, you could look at how much you are having withheld from your paycheck. I understand wanting to have a refund instead of having to pay, but perhaps you could adjust it so you get a smaller refund. If you adjust your deductions, you may be able to save up for a bike in a couple of years with no change to your current budget if you put the difference in savings. And if you are really serious, you could add to it so you have a cushion for those “responsible adult” items that have derailed your past bike purchases.

    I’ve been having the “save for the next car & retirement” vs “want a coverstitch machine NOW” argument with myself lately, so I know it’s not always easy. For me, it takes some serious self control some weeks.

  • #165260
    Avatar of jsights
    jsights
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    PianoLady, I agree on “it’s the other drivers.” That’s what caused my accident 8 years ago…a stupid driver. Another addage I always say about bikes, that I learned from the guy who taught me to ride, “the second you are no longer afraid of the bike, you should get rid of it.” You should always have a healthy dose of fear for the machine, because that little bit of fear will help to keep you cautious and aware.

    Jen

  • #165332
    Avatar of root
    root
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    My wife and I got rid of our bikes (K1100RS and R65) seven years ago when we had kids. Nobody told us it costs more to maintain two kids than two bikes!

    We downsized all our riding gear (we used to ride practically year round as long as there wasn’t snow or ice on the road) to just a couple good jackets, pants, gloves and helmets. That way we’re ready when we get the opportunity to borrow friends’ bikes….which is nice.

    And, as a friend told me when we were riding through Greece many years ago…

    I don’t want to be the fastest motorcyclist… just the oldest.

    –M

  • #165362
    Avatar of Gypsie
    Gypsie
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    I’d be afraid that the gear would deteriorate with time. My husband bought some really nice, inexpensive gear from http://www.leatherup.com. That is the same place that my godfather, who owns a Harley shop buys his gear.

  • #165364
    Avatar of lahope
    lahope
    Member

    Justin Case – Need Fellow Unclutterers' Opinions

    You had an accident. You survived. The universe is trying to tell you something. Get rid of the gear and move on!

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