Home Forums Welcome Hello! E-reader price wars

This topic contains 44 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by Avatar of lucy1965 lucy1965 3 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #158603
    Avatar of JuliaJayne
    JuliaJayne
    Member

    I was looking at the Nook last week. Tempting as it was to get one, I didn’t feel it was worth the price. Looks like it won’t be long before it’s priced to really sell.

    http://money.cnn.com/2010/06/21/technology/nook_price_cut/index.htm?section=money_latest

  • #166561
    Avatar of mugwump
    mugwump
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Looks like the new prices are in effect now. Now how to let everyone know I have a birthday coming up… ;)

  • #166570
    Avatar of JuliaJayne
    JuliaJayne
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Start off by talking about how fast this year went, then casually mention the birthday ;)

  • #166634
    Avatar of Julia
    Julia
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Because I’m drowning in books (still), I am starting to think heavily about an e-reader, but I’m really nervous about having to commit to a single format. It’s especially troubling because I’m not sure how to judge the important stuff – the content.

    Before I commit, I want to know more about how quickly books are e-published, and how many books are e-published. I don’t want to buy a reader and find out that the books available contain all the latest horror and the “high heeled shoe on the cover” books, but no Colette, no anthologies, no nature writers? A huge Christian religion section but almost no Buddhism?

    Has anyone seen an evaluation/comparison of the readers on the basis of catalog available?

  • #166636
    Avatar of Zora
    Zora
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    All the readers will be able to read the thousands of free, public-domain ebooks available. Some will be available as human-reviewed files in various text formats (most of them the work of Project Gutenberg and Distributed Proofreaders) and many will be available only as scanned PDFs.

    Most of these books are pre-1923. After that date, availability is spotty. The copyrights of some books weren’t renewed, so they’re public domain and in some cases, processed by humans as text files in various formats. (DP has done quite a few old science fiction mags; proofers just LOVE to work on them.) There are some books available from Gutenberg sites in countries like Australia and Canada, where copyright laws are less absurd. (%$!@#$@ you, Walt Disney!) You can also find many books as pirated ebooks, often of abysmal quality.

    Commercially published, recent books are hit or miss as far as availability in e. I think Amazon might have the biggest selection, as Kindle ebooks, but they are far from offering everything in e. Some publisher seem to feel that if they close their eyes, all that ebook nonsense will just go away!

    The problem with the Kindle is that it locks you into the Amazon system. Ditto for the iPad; locks you into Apple. Some people feel that the Sony reader is the least restrictive of the currently available major brands. Some people predict a tablet (like the iPad) running Android (which is open source), which in my eyes would be the best thing yet: a fully open-source solution.

    Things are changing fast right now; I imagine that more and more will be available in e in the next few years. Don’t wait to get an e-reader. It’s like waiting to get a new computer; there will always be a new and better one in a few months. Don’t deny yourself NOW for an ever-tantalizing future.

  • #166637
    Avatar of Gypsie
    Gypsie
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    First, I have an eReader (Nook) and I love it. As far as getting locked into a format, there is freeware available to manage your ebook library as well as convert formats (http://calibre-ebook.com/) to work with whichever eReader you choose. i.e. Kindle to Nook formats. I have it and it works wonderfully. Also, a lot of the older books are available free on the public domain (back to those copyright laws that Zora mentioned). In fact, I got three books with my Nook (Jane Eyre, Dracula, and Pride and Prejudice). Also, I can buy eBooks the same day that the Hardcovers are released and for about half the cost. Plus, I don’t have to leave the comfort of my favorite reading chair to do it either. BUT, there are some authors who do not publish their works as eBooks (JK Rowling is the first that comes to mind).

    My Nook has allowed me to purge two bookshelves of books. I kept some of my favorites in Hardback and the current pile that my DH is reading. He doesn’t read enough to justify an eReader, whereas I have read 5 books in the last week. And I did check that some of my favorite paperbacks were available in eBook format before purging them.

    Final Thoughts: Dont wait! Dont deny yourself the pleasure of having thousands of books at your finger tips!

  • #166640
    Avatar of Zora
    Zora
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Kindle format to Nook? What about the DRM? That’s the BIGGEST drawback to investing in current ebooks. Several years back, I bought the three volumes of Neal Stephenson’s Quicksilver trilogy as eReader files. They were keyed to my old Sony Clie, which died. Now I can’t read them. Money wasted.

    Blessings upon Baen, which sells ebooks with no DRM, at a reasonable price. Even though I could easily steal from them, I don’t; I buy.

  • #166641
    Avatar of chacha1
    chacha1
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Julia, I’ve been drowning in books too (see “the library that ate my apartment”) and just recently downloaded Kindle PC and one book, to see if I would like it. And I LIKE IT. On my laptop I got a brilliantly readable display. And anything I order to read can be read on any Kindle device or reader, so if I eventually get a dedicated device I’ll have access to anything I’ve downloaded.

    Just knowing all that content is available has enabled me to clear out over 40 novels already, with more to come. I’m checking the vast Kindle Store to see what’s available, and if a title (in a non-collectible, non-treasured edition) in my library is available, I am giving it away – because if I absolutely, positively, have to read that book again, I can get it in a minute.

    I’m confident that Amazon will be around, the content library will continue to expand, and the Kindle platform will continue to evolve, throughout my lifetime. It took quite a bit of internal debate, but this has been a major victory in my uncluttering campaign.

    Though anyone looking at my bookshelves would probably say, eh? :-)

  • #166642
    Avatar of suzymob
    suzymob
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I’ve seen other posts on Unclutterer about the value of Libraries. One thing those posts often miss is that libraries can be great sources for info on technology as well as books and magazines. Some libraries or library systems have e-book readers and other devices for in-house use and some even have them for check out Comparing features is great, but there’s nothing like being able to handle the devices & see how they look, work and feel in your hand. A few libraries/library systems I know of have ipads and netbooks as well as Kindles, Nooks & a variety of other equipment. Offering these technologies helps libraries and librarians to be familiar with the technologies customers are using and it’s great service to the public as well!

  • #166654
    Avatar of Zora
    Zora
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Richard Askenase, in a comment thread over at Teleread:

    “I believe that Sony will NOT be a long term player in ebooks. 1) They have been continuallty struggling with matching Amazon prices for the hardware. 2) Their bookstore is totally non-comptetive and won’t be so. 3) No One thinks of them in terms of books. So, I think they’ll be gone by 2012.

    “Kobo I don’t see as a long term player in the US market either. 1) Borders may be bye bye (or at least shrinking by 30-50%), thus the major retail outlet for the Kobo will diappear. And, Borders is not much of an ebook store anyway. Kobo does have a good product apparently, though, according to Joanna, it still needs major software upgrades, but I think their future is Canada, Australia, etc, NOT America.

    “B & N has done an excellent job fixing the Nook, and now competing on better price and wifi model. Also, I see that the B & N ebook sales may have bettered Amazon in March/April, according to reports. I think that is a big shot across the bow of Amazon, and has startled them MORE than lowering the nook price. So, B & N is in this for the long run (and their in-store marketing is pretty good).

    “Apple’s iBook store, in my opinion, will not be a very big player although they will continue to sell many iPads. 1) They are so far behind Amazon and B & N on number of books in the bookstore and the reviews, etc within the store, that they will not catch up. 2) In fact, I do not believe that they will try. Look Amazon has over 615,000 ebooks in the store, and still over 580,000 after deducting the free public domain books. Apple is at about 50,000- not competitive. I think the iBook store will stick with best sellers only and not go for depth of catalogue. 3) I still believe that it has been shown that not much book reading is being done on the iPad. The number of 2.5 books downloaded per ipad is a JOKE, and does NOT make the iPad a serious ebook reader for the serious reader. Newspapers and magazines will be its reading forte (which is fine).

    “Finally, I think the big elephant NOT yet in the room is Google. I don’t really understand where Google is going. Will they sell an ebook reader? How will they sell ebooks to other ereaders? We should see their strategy over the next 18 months.”

  • #166665
    Avatar of lucy1965
    lucy1965
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    My husband’s boss today suggested that it would be a good idea to adapt some of the software the company produces to run on e-readers, so he might be getting a Nook to play with.

    I’ll eventually be making the switch, as I have visual limitations and need to be able to resize text and change contrast levels: some books I will always need to own in hardcopy, but for most it’s the information that’s important to me, not the format.

  • #166669
    Avatar of chacha1
    chacha1
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Lucy – the text size and contrast were major considerations. DH is legally blind; with his glasses, he can read fine and is fully functional, but being able to get your average piece of reading material in a large text size is going to make reading a lot more comfortable for him. And I’m sure as I age it will be nice for me, too!

  • #166700
    Avatar of bandicoot
    bandicoot
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    i bought my husband a kindle partly because that was our only option in australia and partly because i’d already started buying kindle books for the kindle app in my iphone.
    o, kindle isn’t perfect. but’s pretty darn good!
    a gf gave me some books in london and i chewed through two of them and was hooked and of course they are a series.
    kindle to the rescue!……i had downloaded two more in the series within three minutes of closing the book.
    if the nook ever becomes available here, i’ll get one of those too and really hedge my bets.
    anything to avoid paperback clutter….

  • #166709
    Avatar of habithacker
    habithacker
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I have the Kindle and like it quite a bit…I also read many books via ereader on my iphone. I think if you stick with the nook or kindle, you’ll be fine. Of course, the ipad does much more than read books so I’d love one of those.

    Finally, I’d only buy as many books as you plan to read before you’ll need to upgrade to the next version of your reading device. If you’ve read most of your previous books, then it won’t be such a big deal if they’re not compatible with your next ereader.

  • #166729
    Avatar of HappyDogs
    HappyDogs
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    For me it is less about the reader and the DRM than it is about the store. If I can’t find the book I want to buy at all (hi there iTunes store!), well then DRM is not an issue. Amazon is simply the best at selling books online. I don’t expect my Kindle to be in use 10 years from now, any more than I expect my fabulous-Droid-phone-that-I-adore to be.

    Like others above, I download books from my library to my Kindle, and some I buy. Classics, like all of Dumas, are $1, so even with the DRM, if you factor in how much it would cost me to physically have all his works, I am ahead financially.

    In the end, for me, it was a decision to not have so many books. Both in my house, and in my bag. My Kindle has about 200 books on it right now, and wherever I am, I can pick something to suit my mood. Love it!

  • #166731
    Avatar of Zora
    Zora
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    You don’t need to buy the classics. You can download them for free from manybooks.net, already prepared in Kindle format.

    Anyone who charges you for public domain ebooks is scamming you.

  • #166732
    Avatar of Gypsie
    Gypsie
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    One advantage of the Nook is that B&N keep a copy of your purchased library and you can re-download at anytime for free any titles purchased. Should something happen to your Nook, you already have an online backup. (Of course, I also keep a back up of all my purchased titles on my external hard drive as well).

  • #166733
    Avatar of HappyDogs
    HappyDogs
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    @zora, that’s true, but the public domain ones frequently don’t have nice TOCs and indexes, and I’m willing to pay some poor editor a dollar to do that for me. I don’t feel scammed, as it is easier for me to find a particular quote or section this way, and to me enhances the edition. YMMV obviously.

  • #166778
    Avatar of chacha1
    chacha1
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    HappyDogs, I agree. Public domain republishing often means very shoddy editing. I got a hard copy of John Stuart Mill that I didn’t realize was somebody’s amateur republication – what a mess!

  • #166783
    Avatar of Zora
    Zora
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Sigh. Project Gutenberg’s early history bites again.

    Until 2001, PG books were produced by people working alone. Some of them were conscientious, some weren’t. Michael Hart, who started PG and owns the trademark, doesn’t care much. He believes in letting people do what they want. He is also suspicious of academics.

    Distributed Proofreaders started in 2001 and was initially producing books to meet PG’s low standards. Over the years we’ve become much more serious about quality. Proofing is now done in five steps, not two. We make HTML versions with TOCs.

    However, the old, BAD books are still in the PG catalog. Many of the most famous of them were done before DP. DP is re-doing some of those, but not all.

    There’s been some talk of setting quality standards and finding a home for a library of free ebooks guaranteed to be of high quality, ones that scholars can trust. So far it’s just talk.

  • #166810
    Avatar of nws2002
    nws2002
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I broke down and replaced my older Sony PRS-500 with a Kindle 2. It was hard to pass up the $139 price for a refurbished one.

    I’ve been getting the New York Times and just called to cancel my local paper, but I did tell them they need to get a Kindle version.

    I didn’t have a ton of books on the Sony, but I am bummed that there is no way to convert them since they have DRM.

  • #166875
    Avatar of Julia
    Julia
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I bit the bullet and bought a Kindle two days ago. The neighborhood B & N didn’t have a Nook I could handle, but Target had a Kindle…so that’s what I bought.

    I have trouble trying to pace my reading (I’m used to doing that by my physical place in the book — never knowing I was doing it), but overall I’m finding it an enjoyable experience – less disconcerting than I had ever hoped.

    I’m curious – the Kindle fits very well in a central pocket of my bag; I am wondering if there’s a good reason to spend $25+ on a case that will only add bulk.

    As someone with a book-buying problem <grin> I’m also looking for hints on restricting the clutter on my credit card. I have an idea or two but maybe I should start another thread for that? (I’m talking about self-control ideas here, NOT interested in ripping off publishers and/or authors.)

  • #166878
    Avatar of chacha1
    chacha1
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Julia, the best self-control tool I’ve found yet is the wishlist system. At Amazon in particular – if there’s a book I’m interested in, I just add it to the wishlist. Then I’ve set myself a certain “allowance” per pay period, and that’s all I get to spend. The allowance really helps me decide between things I really REALLY want, and the things that I just kind of want. :-)

    Similar tactic with catalogs. I get a few that carry clothes that will work for me in either the office or dancing lives. I have a pretty strict clothing budget, so I dogear the “wish” pages and put the catalogs in a drawer. Once a month or so I go through to see if I still want something, and put ‘em back in the drawer if so – in the trash if not. About twice a year I actually order something. It’s just knowing I CAN that gives me the feeling of satisfaction.

  • #166880
    Avatar of Julia
    Julia
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I was thinking of buying myself a gift certificate every 6 weeks or so for my budgeted amount – no gift card, no purchase. Need to read a bit more about their gift card system first.

    Hadn’t thought about the wish list though – sounds useful, thanks.

  • #166881
    Avatar of lucy1965
    lucy1965
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Julia, if your Kindle is sufficiently protected in the bag, I wouldn’t spend extra on a case if you don’t want to (that being said, the Oberon Design covers are gorgeous and if I do wind up getting a Nook, I will probably save up for one: http://www.oberondesign.com/Kindle.php).

  • #166882
    Avatar of Julia
    Julia
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    It’s probably just a peeve kind of thing, but I fail to understand why a company would sell a product that is not sufficiently “protected” to begin with. I have the same annoyance with my iTouch; I bought a case for it because it was simply too slippery without one.

    One of the things I like about the Kindle is the ease of picking it up and starting to read; I don’t want to mess with a case, or with the sensory disconnect of holding a case that feels like a book but isn’t one.

    (By the way – the other reason I chose the Kindle over the Nook was preference for the Amazon website when I’m browsing a general topic. (Most of what I read says the actual readers are neck-and-neck in terms of quality.))

  • #166884
    Avatar of lucy1965
    lucy1965
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I freely admit that my liking for the cover is “oooh, pretty!”; my vision problems are such that I’m going to be transitioning the majority of my library to e-books, and I’m willing to pay a little extra to satisfy my personal sense of aesthetics. Your mileage may well vary. *grin*

    I picked the Nook because I can root it and tinker with the software, but I work with Open Source material and my needs aren’t other people’s. (No, I won’t badmouth Microsoft or Apple: I have friends employed by both companies, and I approve of them eating and paying their bills.)

  • #166925
    Avatar of nws2002
    nws2002
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    @Julia – I had my Kindle covered by one of those Ghost Armor places at the mall. They just put a clear film over the whole thing to stop scratches, it’s the same stuff they use on the leading edge of helicopter rotors. I think you can buy the kits online and do it yourself. I did the same thing with my iPhone about a year ago and it looks great.

  • #166929
    Avatar of awurrlu
    awurrlu
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    You don’t need a dedicated eReader to read Kindle eBooks. For example, there’s Kindle software for the PC, iPhone, iPad, Android phone, and so on. Plus, your purchases are synced across devices. I can read a few chapters on my phone, then pick up where I left off on my netbook. I’ll never be without reading again!

  • #166959
    Avatar of Julia
    Julia
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I do have electronic readers on my iTouch but the physical reading experience is not nearly as comfortable as a dedicated reader is — and pleasure in the act of reading as as important (sometimes more!) as the content I’m reading.

    I might read a manual on a phone because I really need the knowledge – but for pleasure reading, it’s just not going to happen for me.

  • #167011
    Avatar of Gypsie
    Gypsie
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I have a cover for my Nook and I really like it. I prefer to hold/read my Nook with the cover. It just feels better and I can use a normal book light (Mighty Brite) by clipping it on the cover.

  • #167167
    Avatar of JohnGalt
    JohnGalt
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Why would anyone buy anything other than Amazon’s Kindle as their e-Book Reader is a puzzle for me.

  • #167172
    Avatar of lucy1965
    lucy1965
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Possibly because as yet Kindle does not support the .ePUB format and their .PDF reading capability is sluggish, or someone’s fond of Open Source software and would prefer to root a Nook and use Calibre, or they’d rather do their reading on a laptop. A Kindle works for you? Great! But one size/one choice doesn’t fit everyone.

  • #167173
    Avatar of HappyDogs
    HappyDogs
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    @lucy1965 the Kindle 2.5 OS upgrade seems to have fixed the pdf problem, I’m reading some huge pdfs (PayPal’s developer “notes”, 15 pdfs all about 80 pages) and it is just as fast as the books. I also love that I can put my books into categories now, it was getting a bit, well, cluttered!

  • #167177
    Avatar of lucy1965
    lucy1965
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    @HappyDogs Really? Cool!

  • #167197
    Avatar of Zoidbert
    Zoidbert
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I’ve had my Kindle 1 for about, what, 2 years now. Has completely changed how I read — in a good way; I read a lot more. Beyond that, though, is the uncluttered aspect, I know. However, there’s also a survival aspect.

    I was born in 1966; my mom bought me my first real non-kid novel around 1974 or so, it was “Attack from Atlantis” (okay, maybe it was a bit of a kiddie book). Point is, I still have it. Or had.

    I kept just about every paperback I got, had storage boxes full of them in addition to the nicer hardcovers I’d get either new (rarely) or from the bargain aisle (often) or library sale. I had my first-edition STAR WARS paperback I read the summer my mom was in physical therapy from a car accident. The first copy of THE ENTROPY EFFECT, a Star Trek novel, I got (and subsequently decided I wanted to write too). Every book had a memory, strong or slight.

    And in one might swoop, I lost them all — every one of them — to Hurricane Katrina.

    You all know the story of the storm, I won’t rehash it here. I didn’t “lose” any of my music library, because it was all on my iPod and my Mac. So the loss of the physical CDs was tough but not unrecoverable. The movies were a different story — the part of the house the DVDs were in was not bad, so they were recoverable, but the heat and humidity destroyed all the VHS tapes we had — luckily, my family movies were at my office and virtually unaffected.

    The same thought applies now to my reading library. If I drop my Kindle in the ocean, I get another one, and can re-download my purchase history. I don’t lose anything again. Sure, there’s the score of public domain and other-site purchased .mobi books, but those are also on my Mac and part of my daily backup ritual so there’s just the matter of moving them back onto the Kindle.

    The Kindle isn’t a perfect system — I’m still eyeballing the iPad as an alternative in the future — but it’s pretty damn good for the nightly reading I do. (Esp now that they’ve finally added the ability for folders (collections, I believe it’s called) to sort the 12 or so “pages” of books I have in there.)

  • #167210
    Avatar of chacha1
    chacha1
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Zoidbert, that had to hurt. The Entropy Effect – Great book! And I too am very happy to hear about the “collections” tool. I knew if I held out long enough they would make that thing perfect for me. :-)

  • #167214
    Avatar of lucy1965
    lucy1965
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Zoidbert, I’m so sorry. You make an excellent point: being able to replace the library immediately is a great comfort.

    (On a sidenote, may I say how happy I am to see so many Trek fans around? Half my glee over the Nook is sheer geeky “OMG it’s a PADD! Lookit! Eeeeeeeee!”)

  • #167268
    Avatar of Julia
    Julia
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    One quick note on my purchase control attempt: I bought an Amazon gift certificate for myself before reading the details (I know, I know). Kindle purchases are “one-click” purchases, not eligible for gift certificate payment.

    Grrr. I try to minimize my use of a credit card (a lesson I learned the hard way). I’ll have to think about this some more.

  • #167278
    Avatar of Kamakazi
    Kamakazi
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    Just bought my Kindle for $110 as a refurb. Woot! Should have it by Thursday.

  • #167460
    Avatar of TheBroad
    TheBroad
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I have a Kindle, and I don’t feel “tied into the Amazon system”. I get my e-books from a number of places, and many of them are in .mobi format. The lack of ePub support doesn’t bother me since I have yet to find a book that’s ONLY available in ePub, and I think Calibre can convert ePub to mobi anyway. With the international wireless, I’ve found my Kindle to be a real lifesaver since I live abroad. When I go on a visa run, I can leave my computer at home and still be connected to news and email. It really saves on how much I pack. In addition, internet over cellular signals isn’t blocked in China :) They removed the $2 per book download fee for Americans abroad a couple of months ago, and it only applied to Whispernet purchases anyhow.

    Julia – gift cards ARE a good way to curb your Kindle purchases! Lots of people do this. To get the gift card to work for your one-click purchases, you need to apply it to your account. Go to your account page on the website and you should see a link somewhere for it. I’m currently working through a $100 gift card that I got with credit card points.

  • #168456
    Avatar of foilhead1
    foilhead1
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    I downloaded Kindle for my Laptop and my iPod Touch, two things I already own. Try doing that first. My iPod Touch has many ereaders to choose from. Just enjoy yourself. eReaders, computers, they are all like Toasters; you don’t care how they work, you just want crispy bread!

  • #168944
    Avatar of lucy1965
    lucy1965
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

    My husband bought me a Nook.

    EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

    After we both finish with work for the day, we’re going to Costco to pick up a couple of micro SD cards: a little software tweaking and we can load the Kindle software for Android devices on it, and then somebody better hide my credit card because I am gonna buy some books.

    EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

    He called it an early birthday present. My birthday is in December.

    Ask me how excited I am. Go on, ask me. :-)

    (Yes, I have put ST: TNG screensavers and wallpaper on it. Because I am just that much of a geek. And yes, my collection of “Trek” ebooks are loaded on it. I am not going to have any problems meeting my “Thing A Day” requirements next week!!)

  • #168968
    Avatar of klutzgrrl
    klutzgrrl
    Participant

    E-reader price wars

    “Yes, I have put ST: TNG screensavers and wallpaper on it. Because I am just that much of a geek. And yes, my collection of “Trek” ebooks are loaded on it. “

    oh now I want one.

    you don’t sound excited… at all.. much!! lol! Enjoy!

  • #168976
    Avatar of lucy1965
    lucy1965
    Member

    E-reader price wars

    *blushes madly* OMG, I did write that.

    This is the wallpaper; this is the screensaver. I’m thinking of this skin (but I will stop short of finding a ‘Fleet insignia to put on it). :-)

    In uncluttering news, between us we’ve cleared a bookshelf of public domain books! We’re going to start on the cookbooks today — most of them we only use three or four recipes.

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