Barnes and Noble now selling audio books online

Barnes and Noble has announced that it is jumping into the online audio book market with its launch of Barnes and Noble Audiobooks.

Most of the books are between $10 and $20 per download, and they already have more than 10,000 titles for sale. The new service will compete with Audible, iTunes, and Kindle.

If you’re looking for ways to expand your book collection but without bringing more physical books into your home, be sure to give audio books a try.

(via Publishers Weekly)

14 Comments for “Barnes and Noble now selling audio books online”

  1. posted by Lily on

    Sadly, audio books render me unconscious! Every time I try to listen to one, the soothing sounds of the reader put me right to sleep. I have one on my iPod that has been there for years and I’ve never gotten through the first chapter on my frequent plane trips for work. 10 minutes in and I’m out. They’re great for insomnia, though.

  2. posted by Dimitar Nikolov on

    I’ve never liked listening to audio books. Just as Lily said in the first comment, they make me too sleepy to be able to concentrate.

    But one way I try to unclutter my home is to buy ebooks and only print out the pages I need.

    This has saved quite a lot of book space on my shelves.

  3. posted by Amanda on

    I love love love audible books — got a nano about 3 years ago and joined Audible.com, and I have thoroughly enjoyed the site and downloaded books. But I also love the audible storytelling tradition ~ I commute via ferry about 3 hrs total a day, and the audible books have been great for not having to carry extra stuff to keep me entertained. I also like to listen while doing yardwork (makes weeding almost enjoyable!) Moving while listening keeps me from dozing off to the soothing narration :)

  4. posted by knitwych on

    I love audio books – as long as the narrator is a good one. There are some lousy ones out there, but Barbara Rosenblatt and Frank Mueller are extremely good, IMO. I like them so much that I’ll listen to a book simply because they’re narrating it, even if I’m not familiar w/the author.

    I’ve listened to audio books while working, painting walls, driving, crafting, and cleaning/organizing. I can’t just sit and listen to an audio book without doing something else simultaneously, but I have found that they are great for making less-than-interesting tasks fly by.

    If you’re into audio books, check w/your local library to see if it has access to a digital library. If so, you can download audio files for free, and save money.

  5. posted by Liberty on

    I’m happy to see that these are in DRM-free MP3 format!

    Without the DRM, you actually *own* these audiobooks. Nobody can take them away from you, you don’t have to worry about the keyserver ever disappearing and rendering the books useless (a worry with DRM-infected works), and you can transfer them to any device in the future without getting anyone’s permission or paying another fee. This is a very good thing!

  6. posted by Jenny on

    To save on space AND cash, you could also just visit your local library…

  7. posted by Andrea Korogi on

    Audio books have made many a trip fly by. One of the most recent audio books I bought was by Allison Maslan, a life and career coach. If you’re looking for a great book on how to start a new career or business – or how to use the same step-by-step principles to find a partner, you can pick up the audio book at http://www.myblastoff.com. It helped me – good luck!

  8. posted by Nick on

    I like the idea of audio books / books on Kindle, etc. but at the end of the day, it could actually be more expensive than either 1) buying the used book on Amazon and then re-selling it after reading or donating it for a tax deduction, or 2) going to the library to read it or 3) borrowing it from a friend. All of these options reduce clutter AND help save money. And who couldn’t stand to save a few bucks THESE days? Right?

  9. posted by Jack on

    I listened to dozens of audiobooks and podcasts at my previous data entry job. Definitely a good way to keep your mind engaged during dull tasks. For free options, check out original podcast fiction by authors like Mur Lafferty and JC Hutchins too.

  10. posted by Another Deb on

    In the long commute years I worked right next to the main library and would go through several audio books a week. I enjoyed the vocal stylings that brought thes characters alive and found many authors and genera I would never have tried otherwise.

    That said, I cannot fathom spending twenty dollars on something I will only listen to once, and would find difficult to even give to a friend to read.

  11. posted by Availle on

    I have just recently started to listen to audiobooks because I have a lengthy commute twice a week. I’m an avid reader and could not imagine it, but it really helps clearing my reading list :-)

    For free audiobooks in the public domain (no DRM issues!) go to librivox.org

    It covers mainly the classics (Austen, Twain, Dickens,…) and is read by volunteers only, so beware, the quality may vary!

  12. posted by Christian on

    I would go insane without audiobooks for my commute. Like other people have said, though, you don’t need to spend $20 for something you’ll listen to once. For that matter, you don’t need to buy a book for one reading. My library has lots of audiobooks and the regular kind, so I’m there often.

  13. posted by Scott Kingery on

    Nice…except…They cost the same as CD’s!! At least the one book I looked for. That, friends, is ridiculous.
    I like the idea of buying from B&N because it doesn’t mean signing up like Audible but Audible is WAY cheaper if you read (listen) a lot.
    There are some audio book which I am really glad I have on audio. Things like David Allen’s GTD or others that are similar and are good to refresh with from time to time.

  14. posted by Open Your Own Audio Book Online Store | Order Book Online on

    [...] Barnes and Noble now selling audio books online Barnes and Noble has jumped into the online audio book market. Without the DRM, you actually own these audiobooks. Nobody can take them away from you, you don’t have to worry about the keyserver ever disappearing and rendering the books useless (a worry with DRM-infected works), and you can transfer them to any device in the future without getting anyone’s permission or paying another fee.  [...]

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