Vertabrae bathroom system for really small bathrooms

After our post on the hideaway sink ran two weeks ago, we received an email from one of our readers asking us if we had seen the Vertabrae® bathroom system. We hadn’t yet seen it, and we thought you might want to see it too. The Vertabrae system is an incredibly compact and vertical bathroom unit that houses just about everything you need in your bathroom. The design is by Paul Hernon of Design Odyssey Ltd.

More information on the Vertabrae:

This stylish aluminum sculpture of seven stacked modules that rotate from the center “spinal column,” has every basic item you need in a bathroom, plus it leaves you some room to bend down to touch your toes without hitting your head on the way up.

With a toilet, sink and two modules (one for children), the Vertibrae gives most of the space in your bathroom right back to you. And the Vertebrae even provides some space for shower, bath, shaving, and cosmetic products right along the column. Cleaning supplies and your favorite toilet paper… in the cupboards under the toilet seat.

Thanks to reader Richard for sharing this interesting concept with us.

22 Comments for “Vertabrae bathroom system for really small bathrooms”

  1. posted by Another Deb on

    What, no towel bar?

  2. posted by Miguel de Luis on

    I have a nightmare… where do I place my feet on?

    Please tell me it’s not in you know where.

  3. posted by Plaid Ninja on

    Wow… prison chic at its finest.

    Call me old fasioned, but I’m not really into the idea of the entire bathroom being my bathtub, nor showering with the toilet.

  4. posted by timgray on

    Not that efficient. Take a look at most RV bathrooms for efficient setups.

    I personally dont want to straddle the toilet when I shower.

  5. posted by Nicolas Roberge on

    Before getting all excited, thing about maintenance et cleaning. All the moving parts will get shower splash all over them and it seems to be designed to be installed in a corner of a small room, so what about the behind of this contraption (yuck).

  6. Avatar of Erin Doland

    posted by Erin Doland on

    @timgray — The toilet moves, so you wouldn’t straddle it in the shower.

  7. posted by momofthree on

    Yea-I agree, prison chic.
    And I don’t know about you people, but water sprays down on me and when it hits my shoulders, bounces off and hits the walls and the shower curtain too.
    just how is the water contained once it leaves the shower head?
    No place to put your towel so it doesn’t get wet before you attempt to dry off.
    Forget to close the cubby that holds the shampoo and everything in there will be swimming on it’s own…and, just how water proof is the “storage” under toilet.
    Wet TP anyone?
    Yea, it looks cool, but just how practical is it?

  8. posted by Shalin on

    Wow that is clever! …it’d be terrible to accidentally turn on the shower when your on the WC though! ;)

    –S

  9. posted by Richard on

    You should hear what plumbers are saying…

    “It would be nice if you wanted your bathroom to look like a prison cell.”

    “S, S, & S all at once!” (That would be S***, Shave, & Shower)

    “Can’t see it here in the U.S. – Americans are too puritan! We don’t like to S where we S.”

    “Can’t see it here in the U.S. – Americans are too puritan! We don’t like to S where we S.”

    “Talk about a space saver! I would be afraid I’d poop in the wrong spot!”

    Now my own thoughts. About the only people interested in this will be extremely high end clients with “micro-spaces” for living quarters.

    I see a lot of press releases for exotic, space saving plumbing fixtures. Much of would not even appeal to the common person. The appeal is not in the practicality, it’s in the bragging rights for your exotic plumbing fixtures. See, for some of these people, form is more important than function and they will sacrifice lots of function and pay mega bucks to have a “cool” form to show their friends.

    Richard

  10. posted by Tabitha (From Single to Married) on

    Wow – now I’ve seen it all!

  11. posted by emmy on

    I love space saving designs and think this is pretty cool! But it’s not $17,000 worth of cool. ;)

  12. posted by Ana on

    In Europe I often came across bathrooms that were just a small room, tiled all over. No separate shower enclosure or anything like that. I think this fixture is designed for that sort of aesthetic. With a little thought you should be able to place the towel bar in a position where it won’t get splashed much, if nothing else, hang a small rod on the back of the door with a shower curtain, and put the towels behind it. It’s not really my style, but I don’t think ‘prison’ I see it as ultra modern, and it would allow you to create a whole bathroom in a space the size of a small closet.

  13. posted by M.R. on

    @Ana! You said exactly what I was thinking about my former shower in Utrecht, Netherlands! I could sit on the toilet, brush my teeth and take a shower all at the same time. Not that I did (gross), but I could have.

    In all, I think this IS all about someone just trying buy all the cool toys. I would HATE to clean the joints of this thing. Disgusting.

  14. posted by michelle on

    I am sorry, but I don’t want my toothbrush that close to my toilet.

  15. posted by Jeanne B. on

    I’m thinking, this is pretty cool! I’ve toured a lot of horse trailers that come with “weekender package” living quarters, and they have what’s known as a “Cowboy shower”–basically the room where the toilet resides IS the shower stall. So this concept is not new to me, but this sure is a thousand times more stylish! I love how the key elements of the Vertabrae are moveable versus the Cowboy shower which is static. This would be far easier to keep clean, too. If they could put this in a horse trailer, I’d buy it.

    As for keeping my toothbrush within proximity of my toilet, well no offense, ma’am, but… what difference does it make if it’s on your counter three horizontal feet away at home, or three vertical feet away in the Vertabrae? Maybe because I’m usually knee-deep in horse hair, manure and hay, I’m not so fussy. ;-)

  16. posted by Beverly D on

    This is not unlike what’s known as a “wetbath” on a boat. They are very common. I personally like a separate shower but lots of people would rather have this than no shower at all, which is what some boats have. You do have to think out your moves so that cabinets are closed and your towel is away from the spray, but it’s more workable than you would think. You wipe it down when you’re done, so housekeeping is quick.

  17. posted by himbraim on

    This is depressing.

    If you’d shown this contraption to people two hundred years ago, they’d said:

    “I am a human being, in Gods name! you suggest I live like a dog- YOU must be the dog!”

  18. posted by A.M.B.A. on

    This system would’ve been a major improvement over what our family of four endured bathroom-wise while recently living in China for a year. But it’ll never win many fans in the U.S.

  19. posted by lynette on

    I’ve seen smaller get-ups in Italy/Europe. The entire bathroom, WC included, was actually smaller than my arm span. This whole contraption actually wouldn’t fit in some of the Italian B&B bathrooms. I’d love to see this setup in one of those portable glass houses. Personally, I’ll take my tub and separate sinks from my husband.

  20. posted by daniel on

    I’d sooner buy a japanese style bathroom from TOTO if it was marketed in the USA.

  21. posted by Seth on

    Not really my style, and certainly not in my budget!

    But I will echo what others have said – when I lived and traveled in Asia almost all of the bathrooms I saw were bare tile with a shower on the wall – no tub or stall – just a floor drain. A couple had a small lip to guide water, but most didn’t even have that.

    I saw a couple of brand new condos with American style tubs/shower stalls. But I don’t think the owners were used to the idea of staying in one place during a shower, because when they finished there was usually water splashed around the entire room. I suspect they hopped in and out of the shower to do other things, or maybe even pointed the shower head outside of the shower stall.

    Neither way is necessarily better, but it’s worth realizing there are big cultural differences in room design.

  22. posted by Alan on

    I see a lot of press releases for exotic, space saving plumbing fixtures. Much of would not even appeal to the common person. The appeal is not in the practicality, it’s in the bragging rights for your exotic plumbing fixtures. See, for some of these people, form is more important than function and they will sacrifice lots of function and pay mega bucks to have a “cool” form to show their friends.

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