Creating a personal strategic plan

Setting goals, working on projects, and tackling action items are three things I do on a regular basis to keep my work and personal life afloat. They’re the backbone of what I refer to as the Daily Grind.

The Daily Grind doesn’t happen by accident, though. I’m not a person who sits around and lets things fall into her lap or wish for the perfect opportunity to open up to me. I try to have purpose to my actions and am proactive in my dealings. Because of my desire to live with purpose, guiding my Daily Grind is a personal Strategic Plan. Much like a Strategic Plan that guides a business, my plan guides who I want to be. It keeps me on track, helps me reach my goals, and keeps me from feeling like I’m in a rut or walking through life as a zombie.

Similar to how a business creates a Strategic Plan, I created a plan for myself. In the book How Organizations Work by Alan Brache, strategy is defined as “the framework of choices that determine the nature and direction of an organization.” If you replace the words “an organization” with “my life” you get a solid idea of a personal Strategic Plan.

Brache continues in his book to discuss how to create an effective Strategic Plan for a business. Building on his ideas, but with a bent toward the personal, I created the following process for how to create my plan and how you can create a plan, too.

Five steps to living with a personal Strategic Plan

  1. Collect data and analyze your current situation. What are your strengths? (The book Now, Discover Your Strenghts can help you answer this question.) How do you process information? What in your life do you love? What activities in your life do you look forward to or wish you had more time to complete? What are the activities you loathe and want to get out of your life completely or reduce dramatically? What competes for your attention? What are your core beliefs and how does your life reflect those ideals? Do you like the things you say you like, or is habit guiding your behavior?
  2. Make the tough choices. How far into the future are you willing to work with this Strategy? (I recommend no more than three years.) Review the data you collected and analyzed in the first stage, and put into words your core beliefs that under no circumstance are you willing to break. State what obligations in your life you must fulfill. State your strengths and which of these should continually be highlighted in your life. What stands out the most in your life as being the positive force for your actions? More than anything else, what makes you happy?
  3. Communicate (draft) your personal Strategic Plan. Put into words the plan that will guide your Daily Grind. Write it in words that you understand and trigger memories of why and how you chose your plan. Your Strategic Plan isn’t a mission statement, it can fill more than one sentence of text. It probably won’t be a 20+ page document like many businesses create, but it should be at least a page or two containing the gist of your vision. Be realistic and let the document wholly reflect who you are and who you want to be. This is just for you, not anyone else, so let it speak to and for you.
  4. Work with your Strategic Plan as your guide. Make decisions about how you spend your time and all aspects of your Daily Grind under the guidance of your plan. Try your best to keep from straying outside the bounds of your Strategic Plan. Live with purpose.
  5. Monitor and maintain your Strategic Plan. Sometimes life throws us a wrench when we were looking for puppies and rainbows. Or, something even better than you ever imagined can happen. Update and monitor these changes and see if your Strategic Plan needs to be altered as a result. If no major change has taken place, evaluate your performance within your plan and check to see if you’re getting lazy and letting things slide. Maybe you realize that your plan wasn’t broad enough, or maybe it was too specific. It’s your plan, so work to keep it healthy.

Ideas and Suggestions

What you choose to put into your plan is a deeply personal choice and how your plan looks is as unique as your finger print. If you’re looking for ideas or suggestions to get you started, consider the following:

  • Your relationship with your children, spouse, parents, siblings, friends.
  • Your spiritual and philosophical beliefs, how you practice those beliefs, and how you incorporate them into your daily life.
  • Your career goals and how much energy and focus you choose to commit to these achievements.
  • Your time and how you choose to spend it.
  • Your health and your objectives regarding your health.

Your strategic plan shouldn’t be a list of goals about these topics, but rather the guiding philosophies behind those goals. For instance, if in your Daily Grind you have action items about losing five pounds, those action items might reflect your Strategic Plan: “I enjoy the time and active relationship I have with my growing children. Staying healthy and in good physical condition allows me to have energy for this time with my children and allows me to work when I’m at work. Good health also is one way that I can work to have more years with those I love. It is important to me that I make healthy choices with regard to nutrition and exercise.”

Do you have a Strategic Plan? Does it help to keep clutter — especially time and mental clutter — from getting out of control? If you haven’t written a personal Strategic Plan before, do you think this is a tool that can help you?

8 Comments for “Creating a personal strategic plan”

  1. posted by Sarah on

    Couldn’t have been more timely for my life.

    Thank you. :)

  2. posted by Someone on

    “Your strategic plan shouldn’t be a list of goals about these topics, but rather the guiding philosophies behind those goals.”

    Ah, good point. I think this is key.

  3. posted by Chris on

    Very good post. The personal strategic plan—basically a nicely put name for, “What are your goals and how are you going to achieve them.”

    ANd I love that you are focusing on the whole picture. A person’s goals should reflect the areas you listed at the end—relationships, spiritual beliefs etc.

    Nicely done!

  4. posted by Bodhi on

    I am changing jobs at the moment, and fields. The further out question is definitely where do I want to end up? Crafting a strategic plan master document is a perfect idea for what I’m dealing with, and though it scares the hell out of me, it just may be worth doing.

    I especially like the focus on what drives the actions/goals, not the actions/goals themselves. How they fit into one’s life is far more important.

    Thanks for a great post!

  5. posted by Vintage Mommy on

    I’ve never created a personal Strategic Plan, but I have experienced the power of having specific goals and writing them down.

    One of my goals for 2009 is to attend the BlogHer conference!

  6. posted by Chris @ Lifestyle Project on

    Hi Erin,

    Nice posts. I track my goals or ‘Lifestyle Projects’ as I like to call them. I do always intend to do more strategic planning towards these goals, i.e. actions that I need to do to move it forward.

    I ask “What’s your Lifestyle Project?” at my site. I’ve got quite a few on there now and it is interesting to note that a lot of people are striving for similar goals.

    Cheers,

    Chris

  7. posted by the difference between resolutions and plans (and getting them done) on

    […] You may also consider useful creating a personal strategic plan before you start. This way you can be sure your collection of ‘resolutions’ and wish list actually make sense in the big picture as a set of goals. More info here. […]

  8. posted by the difference between resolutions and plans (and getting them done) | blog dot theo on

    […] You may also consider useful creating a personal strategic plan before you start. This way you can be sure your collection of ‘resolutions’ and wish list actually make sense in the big picture as a set of goals. More info here. […]

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