Unitasker Wednesday: The egg cracker

I used to have a difficult time cracking an egg and not including at least a couple of pieces of shell in the egg as it dropped into the bowl … and then I turned 10.

Seriously, cracking an egg is not difficult. Unless you don’t have hands or have severe arthritis, there is no need for a gadget like this to take up drawer space in your kitchen. The makers of the Egg Cracker wouldn’t agree with me. So, I guess, thank goodness it is dishwasher safe.

If I had one of these, I’d find that it fit nicely in a drawer next to a butter cutter, mango splitter, and the pickle picker.

**Unitasker Wednesday posts humorously poke fun at the single-use items that manage to find their way into our homes.

21 Comments for “Unitasker Wednesday: The egg cracker”

  1. posted by verily on

    It seems like you would have to have a lot of manual dexterity just to use that thing.

  2. posted by Emma on

    To be honest I do generally get a piece or two of shell in. I’m not a good egg cracker, but there’s no way I’d consider buying that – just fish it out with a fork!!

  3. posted by saga on

    Add to that the Ronco Inside-The-Shell Electric Egg Scrambler (http://tinyurl.com/rq2c8) and absolutely no work has to be done to make scrambled eggs!

  4. posted by Ginger on

    I have moderate arthritis, including hand strength problems, and I’m not sure I see the point of this object. A person with severe arthritis would almost certainly have to use it with both hands, and would have trouble anyway if it required much strength.

    (No offense taken at the comment about arthritic folks, btw–just pointing out that I’m not sure it wouldn’t be clutter for most of us too!)

  5. posted by Michele on

    I don’t think I even understand how this gadget works.

    Anyway, the best way to get a piece of eggshell out of the bowl or the pan is to use another piece of eggshell to “attract” the wayward piece. I believe I saw Jacques Pepin demonstrate that trick one time. Reach in with the larger piece of eggshell, touch it to the little bits that dropped in the the bowl, and it’s like magic to get them out.

  6. posted by Julia on

    You still have to tap the whole thing on the counter, according to the description. It might be a slightly better gadget if it also separated the yolk from the white, but still, no.

  7. posted by Recovering Food Waster on

    Good grief. It looks like that process is much more complicated than my method of clunking the egg on the side of the bowl!

    Michele, I will have to try that trick. The organic eggs I get seem to have shells that are more prone to dropping into the bowl, and fishing them out is sort of annoying.

  8. posted by Celeste on

    I’d switch to a carton of EggBeaters and pour my eggs before I would spring for one of these.

  9. posted by greer on

    another egg-related unitasker from the same people: http://www.amazon.com/STACK-SN.....utterer-20

  10. posted by Cyrano on

    As another tip, crack eggs on a flat surface, like a counter, rather than on a sharp edge, like the edge of the bowl. Cracking it on an edge drives broken shell fragments deeper into the egg, while cracking it on a flat surface lowers the risk of that happening.

    What I like to do is put a paper towel on the counter, crack all my eggs on it, then use that paper towel to wipe any egg white off my hands.

  11. posted by DJ on

    And the perfect accessory for the Egg Cracker?

    The Runny Nose Egg Seperator

    http://funideas.com/eggseperator.html

  12. Avatar of Erin Doland

    posted by Erin Doland on

    @DJ — That is so. very. wrong.

    Ewwwwwwwwwwwww!

  13. posted by drew on

    “Anyway, the best way to get a piece of eggshell out of the bowl or the pan is to use another piece of eggshell to “attract” the wayward piece.”

    Sorry, this is no longer the recommended way to go about removing an egg shell from raw eggs because of the potential to cross-contaminate with the LOADS of bacteria found on egg shells.

    Instead, use the handle end of a wooden spoon — works just as well, and you can toss the spoon in the dishwasher when you’re done.

  14. posted by Kristin on

    hahah heh hahahh heeheh ….

    this thing is so ridiculous …. heh hehe

    BHAAHAHAHAHAHHAAHHAAHA

    I’ll have to come back and comment once I stop LAUGHING

  15. posted by Becky on

    I love the melon slicer lined at the bottom.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obi.....tterer-20/

    That thing is huge!!

  16. Avatar of Erin Doland

    posted by Erin Doland on

    Anyone else notice the irony of the company name selling the egg cracker?! Too funny …

  17. posted by Michele on

    @drew — If you’re thoroughly cooking the eggs after you’ve fished out the pieces of eggshell, why does it matter if you’re risking cross-contamination? I’m afraid I don’t understand how this risk compares to, say, chopping raw salad vegetables on the same, unwashed cutting board that you just used for dressing a raw chicken.

  18. posted by tazistanjen on

    If this thing really, really didn’t get any bits of shell in the bowl, I would be tempted. But for now I will try cracking on the counter instead of the edge of the bowl.

  19. posted by NEECIE on

    seems like a good idea for people with only one working hand like myself

  20. posted by Unclutterer’s Unitasker Wednesday posts | RyanYard.net on

    [...] so don’t be offended if you have some of these products.  Some of my favorites so far are The Egg Cracker, The Condiment Gun, Cat Wigs, and the Small Apple [...]

  21. posted by JC on

    Drew – if you are removing eggshell bit from your eggs wih an egg shell from the same egg it is likely already contaminated…no need to contaminate the wooden spoon.

    ” “Anyway, the best way to get a piece of eggshell out of the bowl or the pan is to use another piece of eggshell to “attract” the wayward piece.”

    Sorry, this is no longer the recommended way to go about removing an egg shell from raw eggs because of the potential to cross-contaminate with the LOADS of bacteria found on egg shells.

    Instead, use the handle end of a wooden spoon — works just as well, and you can toss the spoon in the dishwasher when you’re done”"

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